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Full text of "Hatfield Annual Town Report"



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V\K^ VA 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/hatfieldannua19061914hatf 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE- 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 




FOR THE- 



YEAR ENDING MARCH I, 1906 



lOOu 
HERALD JOB PIITNT 

NORTHAMPTON 
MASS. 



Articles in the Warrant for Town Meeting, 
March 19, 1906. 



Article I. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 



meeting. 



Article 2. To choose all necessary Town Officers for 
the ensuing year, including one member of the School Com- 
mittee for three years, one member of the board of Waiter 
Commissioners for three years, one member of the Sinking 
-Fund Commissioners for three years, one member of the 
Library Trustees for three years, one Elector, under the wiii 
of the late Oliver Smith, Esq. To vote on the question "Yes 
or No" shall license be granted for the sale of intoxicating 
liquors in this town for the ensuing year. 

Article 3. To revise and accept the list of Jurors report- 
ed by ithe Selectmen. 

Article 4. To hear the reports of the various Town 
Officers and act thereon. 

Article 5. To receive and pass on town accounts. 
Article 6. To take action in relation to maintenance 
and repairs of highways and bridges for the ensuing year. 

Article 7. To take action in relation to raising money to 
defray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 8. To see what action the town will take in re- 
lation to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Article 9. To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for Memorial Day. 



Article 10. To take action in relation to the support of 
the poor for the ensuing year. 

Article II. To see if the town will employ a teacher of 
music in the public schools for the ensuing year, and make 
an appropriation for the same. 

Article 12. To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for the care of cemeteries) for the ensuing year. 

Article 13. To see if the town will appropriate money 
for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children in Smith 
Academy, who are of suitable age and attainments to attend 
High School. 

Article 14. To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for repairs on school houses. 

Article 15. To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 

Article 16. To see if the town will make an apprepria- 
tion for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 17. To see if the town will employ a teacher of 
drawing in the Public Schools the ensuing year, and make 
an appropriation for the same. 

Article 18. To see if the town will authorize the borrow- 
ing of any money in anticipation of taxes the ensuing pear. 

Article 19. To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for Lighting the Public Streets. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vole to extend the 
drain in North Main Street southerly, and make an appro- 
priation for the same. 

Article 21. To see if the town will fit up a place for an- 
other School Room, or build a new School Building and raise 
or appropriate money for the same. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to build a Gravel 
or Concrete Walk on the northerly side of Elm street, 



5 

from Kingsley's Bridge westerly to the residence of M. "La- 
iMountain' and make an appropriation for the same. The 
abutters to pay one-'half the cost. 

Article 213. To see if the town will vote to build a Gravel 
Walk from a point in front of the School House at Bred- 
street, to a point opposite the residence of E. W. Field, and 
make an oppropriation for the same, the abutters to pay half 
the cost. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to extend the 
Water Main to the residence of John Kearns, and make an 
appropriation for the same. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to enlarge the 
Main Street Cemetery, and make an appropriation for the 
same. 

Article 26. To see if t'he town will accept as a Public Way 
Raymond Avenue, as laid out from School Street to Chest- 
nut Street, across the property of King and Matthews, as 
per plan filed in the Town Clerk's Office. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to establish Nigbt 
Schools, and make an appropriation for the same. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to buy a Steam 
Roller, and raise or appropriate money for the same. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to build any 
Permanent Roads, of stone or other material, and raise or 
appropriate money for the same. 

Article 30. To see if the town will rescind the vo es pass- 
ed in the years 1846 and 1847, m regard to the price of burial 
lots in the Main Street Cemetery, and establish another price. 

x\rticle 31. To see if the town will vote to build any 
Sidewalk on any part of any street, and make an appropria- 
tion for the same, the abutters to pay one-balf the cost. 

Article 32. To see if the Town will construct an outlet 
adequate for storm water and sewerage from the common at 
the lower end of Main street, to the Connecticut or Mill river 
and make an appropriation for the same. 



Selectmen's Report. 



To the Citizeyis of Hatfield Mass. 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the requirements of th: 
Public Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for 
the year ending March i, 1906, is respectfully submitted. 

We have at present but one person receiving full sup- 
port, and one person receiving partial support. 

POOR EXPENDITURES. 



Mrs. P. T. Vining, board of Mary Jane Manchester, $147.00 

Dickinson Hospital, treatment P. J. Godin, 79.00 

City of Northampton-, board of Sidonie Vollinger, 89.40 

City of Northampton, board of P. J. Godin, 60.60 

P. Ahearn & Co., Burial of John Caykaski, - 15-00 
Dickinson Hospital, board and treatment John 

Caykaski 19.00 

M. J. Ryan car fare John McDermott to Tewksbury, 3.00 
Chas. A. Byrne medical attendance L. H. Gould's 

family, 12.50 

Chas. A. Byrne," medical attendance H. P. Tisdale, 10.50 
City of Northampton, aid rendered A. Gendreus 

family 50.18 

C. N. Clark, house rent, A. Geiidreivs family, 40.00 

J. S. Bardwell, wood Margaret O'Neil, 3.00 

P. Ahearn & Co., burial o'f Sidonie Vollinger, 3'8-GO 



City of Northampton, aid rendered Joseph Prew and 

family, 90.61 
City of Northampton, aid rendered Wm. Prew and 

family, 7.00 

David Landry, board of F. J. iGodin, 15.00 

Geo. D. Thayer, medical attendance F. J. Godin, 21.50 

M. J. Ryan, cash for medicines for F. J. Godin, 4.30 

IM. J. Ryan, groceries Margaret O'Neil, 52.78 
H. LaMontain, house rent L. H. Gould and family, 

1903. 4-5. 43- 2 5 
M. J. Ryan, groceries L. H. Gould and family, 

1903,4-5, 1 14. 12 



$915.74 



STATE AID. 

Charles R. Crafts, $36.50 

MEMORIAL BUIiLjDIiNG. 

Howard & Smith, Coal, $ 49.88 

Hatfield Gas. Co., Lights, 31.19 

L. H. Kiingsley, Janitor, 75-00 



$156.07 



PUiBILEC LIBRARY. 

Louisa Billings, Librarian, $ 8.00 

Katherine Lovett, Assistant Librarian, 10.57 

Thomas J. Flynn, Books, 8.94 

S. E. Bridgeman & Co., Books, 163.83 

H. R. Huntling & Co., Books, 5.00 

Mrs. €. K. 'Morton, iBooks, 1.50 

C. E. Plumb, Books, 6.95 



s 

Ealch Bros., Books, 4.00 

R. B. Eisold, Binding Books, 10.5O 

W. D. Billings, Cataloguing Books, 10.00 

C. M. Barton, Librarian, 31-47 

'Margaret A. Mullany, Librarian, 18.25 

Ruby Bard well, Asst. Librarian, 6.72 

$285.73 
• HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 
(Ordinary Repairs.) 

A. L. Strong, Plank, $218.99 

A. L. Strong, Railing, 5.10 

A. L. Strong, Stone, 2.00 

W. H. Riley & Co., Akron Tile. 30.2c? 

Howard A. Smith, Cement, 8-25 

L. H. Kings-ley, Posts, 2.50 

E. W. W'ilcott, use of derrick, 1904, 3.00 

E. N. Dickinson, Stone, 6.00 

W. N. Flynt Granite Co., Stone, 34-35 

H-. Shumway, Team and Labor, 203.92 

T. J. Ryan, Tea mand Labor, 152.00 

James Ryan, Team and Labor, !3 2 -95 

A. Breor, Team and Labor, 7.00 

B. M. Warner, Team and Labor, 7.00 
A. H. Craves, Team and Labor, 7.00 
E. W. & S. H. Field, Team and Labor, 3.50 
O. S. & A. P. Graves, Team and Labor, - 6.50 
W. H. Belden, Team and Labor, 9.15 
J. S. Bardwell, Team and Labor, 7.50 
J. C. Ryan, Team and Labor, 8.75 
J. S. Newman, Team and Labor, 24.00 
J. J. Batzold, Team and Labor, 10.50 



J. Mullins, Team and Labor, 18.00 

F. Carl, Team and Labor, 4.85 
W. Langdon, Team and Labor, 3.50 
P. J. Boyle, Team and (Labor, 3.50 
L. L. Pease, Team and Labor, 3.5c 
Wha-len Bros., Team and Labor, 3.50 
C. H. & A. Crafts, Team and Labor, 19.50 
O. »Belden & Sons, Team and Labor, 3.50 
W. E. Boyle, Team and Labor, 3.50 
W. Fox, 'Labor, 6.00 
M. Sperber, Labor, 4.50 
W. F. Boyle, Labor, 1.50 

G. M. Franklin, iLabor, 29.25 
T. Fitzgerald, Labor, 3.00 
J. Wheeler, Labor, 3.00 

F. L. Bet sold, Labor, 17-50 

G. Sulick, Labor, 1.50 
J. J. Ryan, Laber, 3.75 
A. Wkkles, Labor, 7.50 
J. L. S'heehan, Labor, 58.12 
J. S. Denlein, Labor, 4.50 
Peter Denlein, Labor, 18.65 
F. C Dngal, Labor, 12.00 
J. J. Breor, Labor, 5.00 
F. L. Betsold, Stone, 13.00 
M. J. Ryan, Hardware, etc., 41.16 
J. F. Leary, Sand, 5.00 
F. P. Jones, Loam, 3.75 



$1,192.27 

DRAINS AND FILL-IN NO. MEADOW. 

W. H. Riiley & Co., Tile, $29.15 

F. W. Prince, Brick, 4.8c 

F. W. Prince, Labor, 1.75 



w 

M. J. Proulx, Labor, 1.75 

W. F. Boyle, Labor, 3.75 

Geo. Franklin, 'Labor, 3.75 

J. Mullins, Labor, 5.00 



FILLING WiASHOUT ON PLAIN. 



$49-9: 



J. C. Ryan, Team and Labor, $37-50 

T. J. Ryan, Team and Labor, 4.55 

J. S. Bardwell, Team and Labor, l 7>50 

J. L. Boyle, Team and Labor, 1 $-7b 

E. Godin, Team and Labor, 10.50 

P. T. Boyle, Team and Labor, m 10.50 

M. W. Boyle, Team and Labor, 14.00 

Whalen -Bros., Team and Labor, 14.00 

G. A. Billings, Team and Labor, . 3.50 

J. L. Sheehan, Labor, 6.75 

John Kairn, 'Labor, 5.12 

G. M. Franklin, Labor, 7.50 

M. Sperber, Labor, 7.50 

J. Wheeler, Labor, 7.50 

T. Fitzgerald, Labor, 7.50 

D. E. Cahill, Labor, 7.50 

M. Wilks, Labor, 4.50 

T.-Sabulo, Labor, 4.50 

Adam Adinski, Labor, 4.50 

W. Jurisick, Labor, 8.00 

Stan Dollar, Labor, 4.50 

John Merrick, Labor, 5.25 

W. Fox, Labor, 4.50 

J. Winzel, Sand, 37-50 

W. F. Boyle, Sand, 8.00 

. $258.42 



u 



GRAVELING ROADS, WESTBROOK. 

W. Holden, Team and Labor, 

E. N. Dickinson, Teams and Labor, 

C. H. & F. A. Crafts, Team and Labor, 
T. Garvey, Team and Labor, 
J. L. Sheehan, Labor, 
G. iM. Franklin, Labor, 

F. C. 'Dugal, Labor, 
P. Denlein, Labor, 
A. Wickles, Labor, 



GAVELING DEPOT ROAD. 



$17.50 


17-50 


28.56 


15-75 


5-25 


7-50 


7-50 


6. 7S 


7-5o 



$113.81 



F. Vollinger, Team and Labor, $ 7.00 
J. Mullins, Team and Labor, 7.00 
D. P. (McGrath, Team and Labor, 7.00 
W. E. Boyle, Team and Labor, 3.50 
C. W. Wade, Team and Labor, 5.25 
J. L. Sheehan, Labor, 3.00 

G. M. Franklin, Labor, 3.00 
F. C. Dugal, Labor, 3.00 
P. Denlein, !L a'bor, • 3.00 
A. Wickles, Labor, 3.00 



.$44.75 

GRAVELING NO. MAIN STREET. 

W. Langdon, Team and Labor, $17-5° 

J. C. Ryan, Team and Labor, 21.00 

J. Breor, Team and Labor, 21.00 

J. Ryan, Team and Labor, 17-50 



n 



L. L. Pease, Team and Labor, 3 l -S° 

J. L. Proulx, Team and Labor, 14.00 

J. S. Bardweli, Team and Labor, 7.00 

Mrs. A. Webber, Team and Labor, 3.50 

M. J. Proulx, Team and Labor, 14.00 

F. Canl, Labor, 4.50 
A. Wickles, Labor, 3.00 
P. Denlein, Labor, 3.00 
M. Sperber, Labor, 9.00 

G. Franklin, Labor, 9.00 
Peter Bovac, Labor, 4.50 



MACADAMIZING DEPOT iROAD. 



$180.00 



H. Shumway, Team and .Labor, $228.32 

T. J. Ryan, Team and Labor, 99- 2 5 

J. S. Bardweli, Team nad Labor, 162.14 

Whalen Bros., 124.95 

M. J. Proulx, Team and Labor, 116.90 

J. C. Ryan, Team and (Labor, 126.00 

J. Codin, Team and Labor, 59-85 

J. H. Ryan, Team and 'Labor, 81.55 

M. W. Boyle, Team and Labor, 109.54 

J. Mullins, Team and Labor, 93-^9 

P. T. Boyle, Team and Labor, 67.90 

D. P. McGrath, Team and Labor, 74-54 

F. Vollinger, Team and Labor, 62.30 

J. F. Batzold, Team and (Labor, 46.90 

W. E. fBoyle, Team and Labor, 8645 

A. Breor, Team and Labor, 58.S0 

J. L. Boyle, Team and Labor, 21.00 

H. E. Bardweli, Team and Lafoor , 49.00 

D. P. Sheehan, Team and Labor, 65.80 

E. Godin, Team and Labor, 64.40 



J3 

J. S. Newman, Team and Labor, 51.10 

B. M. Warner, Team and Labor, 33.60 

David Billings, Team and Labor, 29.40 

G. A. -Billings, Team and Labor, 25.20 

D. W. Wells /Team and Labor, 23.10 
A. H. Graves, Team and Labor. 14.00 
James Ryan, Team and Labor, 7.50 
J. E. Stodard, Labor, 2.2^ 
J. L. Sheehan, Labor, &4-75 

F. C. Dugal, Labor, 50.99 

G. M. Franklin, Labor, 57.74 
J. J. Ryan, Labor, 59.24 
W. Fox, Labor, 43. 12 
P. Denlein, Labor, 50.99 
F. Yaooovill, Labor, 47-24 
L. J. Caston Labor, 126.85 
J. Wheeler, Labor, 9.00 
A. Wickler, Labor, 39-74 
P. Brennan, Labor, 47-99 
J. S. Denlein, Labor, 25.50 
T. Satbolo, Labor, 33 -oo 
T. Pencaski, Labor, 6.00 
John Priski, Labor, 8.25 
R. Fitzgerald, Labor, 21.00 
M. Gagle, Labor, 14.25 

E. C. & E. Davis, Survey and Profile, 29.10 
W. H. Riley & Co., Tile, 72.04 
Freight on Roller, 57-5° 
A. L. Strong, Railing and Posts, 3.42 

A. L. Strong, Gravel, 20.00 
Howard & Smith, Cement, 9.00 
Mass. Broken Stone Co., Stone, 1,217.20 

B. & M. R. R. Co., Freight on Stone, 700.1c 
(Chase & Cooilidge, Oil, 3.40 
P. McCarthy, Coal, 54.01 
Kimball & Cary Co., Coal, 16.88 



u 

Town of Hadley Sprinkling Cart, 2 3-5o 

T. A. Xolan, Loam, 7.50 

S. W. Kings-ley, repairing Sprinkling- Cart, 3.50 

S. W. Kingslev, Sand, 33-76 

M. J. Ryan, Shovels, Lanterns, Oil, etc., I2 -75 



$4,974.14 



Received From Buffalo, Pitts Steam Roller 
Co., Rebate of Freight Paid on Steam 
Roller, . $55.50 

Received From B. & M. R. R. Co., Demurage, 

Paid, 5.00 — 60.50 



$4,913.64 

GRAVELI'NG DEPOT ROAD BRAD-STREET. 

C. H. & F. A. Crafts, Team and Labor, $125.89 

H. Shumway, Team and Labor, 31.5G 

J. Ryan, Team and Labor, 28.50 

W. Connelly, Team and Labor, . 40.25 

W. Holden, Team and Labor, 70.59 

O. S. ■&. A. P. Graves, Team and Labor, .. 5.25 

J. S. Bagwell, Team and Labor, 78.75 

T. Girvey, Team and Labor, 67.67 

E. X. Dickinson, Team and 'Labor, 109.96 

G. M. Donoldson, Team and Labor, 7.00 

J. S. Newman, Team and )Labor 59-5° 

J. C. Ryan, Team and Labor, 3.50 

J. Vollinger, Team and Labor, 10.50 

J. Mullins, Team and Labor 15.25 

G. Vollinger, Team and Labor, 8.75 

W. E. Boyle, Team and Labor, 10.50 

O. Belden & Sons, Team and Labor, 3.50 



J5 



W. H. Beklen, Team and Labor, 
C. W. !M.ars.h, Team and Labor, 

F. P. Jones, Team and Labor, 
'C. Waite, Team and Labor, 
J. L. Sheehan, Labor, 

G. M. Franklin, Laibor, 
F. C. Dugal, Labor, 
P. Denlein, Labor, . 

J. Kairn, 'Labor, 

A. Wickler, Labor, 
J. Brennan, Sand, 

B. L. Strong, Gravel, 

W. N. Flynt -Granite Co., Stone, 
B.-& M. R. R. Co., Freight Stone, 



24.50 


3-50 


3-50 


5.60 


43-5° 


47-^5 


4&75 


38.25 


11.25 


37-50 


1.50 


10.00 


48-45 


20.25 



$1,020. 



GRAVEL WALK ON! SCHOOL AND PROSPECT 

STREETS. 

E. C. & E. E. Davis, Survey and Grade Stakes, $23.90 
H. Shumway, Team and Labor, 53-37 
J. L. Boyle, Team and Labor, 36.75 
J. Godin, Team and Labor, 5.25 
J. S. Bardwell, Team and Labor, 40.25 
T. J. Ryan, Team and Labor, 28. oq 
Whalen Bros., Team and Labor, 38.50 
J. C. Ryan, Team and Labor, 38.50 
M. W. Boyle, Team and Labor, 32.17 
A. Breor, Team and Labor, 7.00 
Mrs. A. Webber, Team and Labor, 7.0c 

F. C. Dugal, Labor, 22.50 
J. J. Ryan, Labor, 24.0c 
J. L. Sheehan, Labor, 18.75 

G. M. Franklin, I abor, 21. oc 



16 

W. 'Fox, Labor, 8.25 

A. Wickler, Labor, 18.00 

T. Saboilo, Labor, 2.25 

F. Yacoovill, Labor, 18.75 

J. Wickles, Labor, 12.00 

Adam Adinski, Labor, 6.00 

T. Fitzgerald, Labor, 16.50 

M. Wilks, Labor, 15.75 

J. Wheeler, Labor, 12.75 

Geo. Sulick, Labor, 7.50 

F. Jubinville, Labor, 9.00 

P. Brennan, Labor, 6.00 

D. E. Ca'hill, Labor, 9.00 

J. Mullins, Labor 7/50 

F. L. [Bets-old, (Labor, 5.00 

F. L. Betsold, Stone, 4.00 

J. L Boyle, Sand, 55-00 



$610.19 



GRAVEL WALK ON CHESTNUT STREET. 

E. C & E. E. Davis, Survey and Grade Stakes, $11.30 
H. S. Shumway, Team and Labor, 7.0c. 1 
W'halen Bros., Team and Labor, 29.40 
J. L. Boyle, Team and Labor, 29.40 
J. Godin, Team and Labor, 27.65 
T. J. Ryan, Team and Labor, 8.75 

F. Vollinger, Team and Labor, 31.15 
W. E. Boyle, Team and Labor, 3.50 



J. L, Sheehan, Labor, 
A. Wickler, Labor, 
T. Fitzgerald, Labor, 
J. Wheeler, Labor, 
M. Witlke, Labor, 
J. MulKns, Labor, 
T. Sabolo, 'Labor, 

F. Yacoovill, Labor, 
D. Landry, Labor, 

G. M. Franklin, Labor, 
P. Denlein, Labor, 
Stan Short, Labor, 

J. J. Ryan, Labor, 
W. Fox, Labor, 
F. L. Betsold, Labor, 
F. L. Betsold, Stone, 
J. L. Boyle, Sand, 
J. Mullins, Sand, 
F. W. Schepp, Sand, 



M 



14-25 
12.15 
12.60 



1 1 


•*s 




•75 


7 


•50 


14 


• 2 5 


14 


•25 


1 


•50 


11 


.2^ 


9 


.00 


9 


.60 


7- 


35 


4 


.10 


4- 


88 


6. 


00 


12. 


50 


6. 


00 


7- 


5c 



$3i4-Sj 



MIAKIMG SfNOW PATHS. 



A. Breor, 
■D. W. Wells, 
H. Shumwav, 



$3.ou 

I. CO 

1.50 



FIRE DEPARTMENT EXPENSES. 



^5-50 



J. J. Batzold, Storing Hose Wagon, 
A. H. Graves, Storing Hose Wagon, 
T. H. O'Dea, Storing Hose Wagon, 



$5.00 
5.00 

5- 



i.oo 



J8 

C. H. & F. H. Crafts, Storing Hose Wagon, 5.00 

C. W. Marsh, 5.00 

J. J. Batzold, Care of Hose, 3.00 

$28.00 

TREE WARDEN EXPENSE. 

F. W. Prince, $ 4.36 

F. L. Betsold, 8.00 



BONDS FOR TOWN OFFICERS. 



INSURANCE. 



$12.36 



Wm. M. Cochran, Bond of Treasurer, $24.00 

Wm. M. Cochran, Bond of Tax Collector, 15.00 

Wm. M. Cochran, Bond of Sinking Fund Treasurer 9.00 



fcS.co 



C. H. Peirce, $138.75 

H. M. McCloud & Son, 15.00 



$153-75 

WATER RENTS. 
Hatfield Water W r orks, $490.00 

MEMORIAL DAY APPROPRIATION. 
C. D. Bardwell, treasurer, $50.00 



\9 

SINKING FOND APPROPRIATION. 

M. J. Ryan, treasurer, $861.67 

CBMETR'Y APPROPRIATION. 
F. H. BardweM, treasurer, $100.00 



STREET LIGHTS. 



Hatfield Gas Co. 



$621.25 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

D. W. Wells, Water Commissioner, $ 10.00 

C. L. Warner, Water Commissioner, 10.00 

M. J. Protvlx, Water Commissioner, , 10.00 

C. H. Crafts, Selectman and Overseer of Poor 75-00 

C. L. Graves, Selectman and Overseer of Poor 75-°° 

M. J. Ryan, Selectman and Overseer of Poor, 150.0 

J. L. Day, Assessor, 48-75 

John Voliinger, Assessor, 50.00 

L. H. Kingsley, Assessor, 72.50 

W. PI. Belden, Registrar of Voters, 8.00 

J. J. Slate ry, Registrar of Voters, 8.00 

F. W. Ryan, Registrar of Voters, 8.00 

Roswell Billings, Treasurer, 100.00 

L. H. Kingsley, Town Clerk, 300.00 

M. J. Ryan, Supt. of Streets, 200.00 

C. K. Morton, Elector, r t).oo 

$1,135-25 



20 

•CONTINGENT EXPENSES. 

Herald Job Print, Printing Town Reports $60.80 

Herald job Print, Printing School Reports 16.80 

Herald Jo'b Print, Printing Ballots, 14.00 

Herald Job Print, Printing Tally Sheets, 12.00 

J. T. Burke, Serving Selectmen's Warrants, 9.00 

Hatfield Gas Co., Lighting Town Hall, 9.84 

J. L. Fairbanks & Co., Pauper Register, 6.50 

Chas. A. Byrne, Returning Births, 1904, 9.00 

Chas. A. Byrne, Disinfecting, 24.00 

E. S. Warner, Inspecting Animals, 57-00 

E. S. Warner, Quartering Animals, 8.50 

E. S. Warner, Inspecting Beeves, etc., 52.80 

Herald Job Print, Printing Notices, 2.25 

E. B. Dickinson, Auditor, 1903 and 1904, 10.00 

Howard Smith, Grass Seed, 4.00 

M. H. 'Burke, Repainting Town Clock, 36.50 

C. D. Bard-well, Care of Town Clock, 20.00 

C. D. Bardwell, Janitor Town Hall, 30-5^ 

Cecil F. Boywall, Tax Bills, 6.15 

A. L. ,Strong, Wood, Town Hall, 5.00 

Chas. A. Byrne, Disinfecting, 4.00 

W. D. Billings, Cash Paid on Express, 1.00 

Geo. Eberlein, Repairing Road (Machine, 2.65 

Chas. A. Byrne, Returning Births, 12.00 

A. J. Bonneville, Returning Births, .50 

C. G. Trow, Returning Births, .50 

J. D. Seymour, Returning Births, .75 

W. J. Collins, Returning Births, 1.25 

Silas Porter, land damages, 5.00 

J. J. Batzold, grading school yard, 3.00 

Coburn & Graves, fumigaters, 1.00 

J. S. Wells, cash paid for advertising, 3.75 

S. W. Kingsley, tampers 2.50 

S. W. Kingsley, services as Constable, 4.00 



2 \ 

P. J. Donovan, right of way, 5.00 

Geo. S. Belden, ballot clerk, 2.00 

C. E. Warner, ballot clerk, 2.00 
F. H. Bardwell, ballot clerk, 4.00 
A. H. Breor, ballot clerk, 4.00 

D. P. McGrath, ballot clerk, 4.00 
L. H. Kingsley, cash paid for postage, 2.30 
L. H. Kingsley, cash paid for express, 2.20 
L. H. Kingsley, cash paid for tally sheets, 4.00 
L. H. Kingsley, cash paid for Assessors' Books, 1.95 
ly. H. Kingsley, cash paid for Tax .Collector's Book, 1.57 
M. J. Ryan services constructing sidewalks and 

special highways, 360. 00 

M. J. Ryan, cash paid on express, .60 

M. W. Mosley, Edge Road 'Machine, 12.00 
S L. H. Kingsley, recording and indexing Births, 

Marriages and Deaths, 44-30 

F. W. Winzel, services as Constable, 2.0c 

» 

$888.46 

APPROPRIATIONS, TOWN MEETING, MARCH 

20, 1905. 

Support of Poor, $ 800.00 

Memorial Building, 150.00 

Public Library, 300.00 

Highways and Bridges, ordinary repairs, 2,000.00 

Macadamizing Depot Road, 5,000.00 

Graveling Bradstreet, 1,000.00 

Bonds Town Officers, 50.00 

Water Rates, 500.00 

Memorial Day, 50.00 

Insurance, 150.00 

Sinking Fund, 861.67 



22 



Cemeteries.. 


100.00 


Street Lights, 


700.00 


Town Officers, 


1 ,400.00 


Firemen's Muster, 


75-oo 


Interest, 


250.00 


Town Debt, 


1,600.00 


Sidewalk. School and Prospect Street, 


500.00 


Sidewalk, Chestnut St. (JBal. in Treasury) 


300.00 


Contingent, 


2981. 26 




$18,767.93 


Schools, 


4,700.00 



RECAPITATIOX OF ORDERS DRAWN MAIKGH 

1, 1906. 

For Poor, $ 91574 

For State Aid, 36.50 

For Memorial Building, 156.07 

For Public Library, 2 &5-75 

For Highways and Bridges, ordinary repairs, 1,839.20 

For School and Prospect Street Sidewalk, 610.19 

For Chestnut Street Sidewalk,. 3I4-&5 

For Macadamizing Depot Road, 4,974.14 

For Graveling Brad Street, 1020.66 

For Free Warden Account, I2 -3^> 

For Bonds Town Officers, 48.0c 

For Water Rates, 490.00 

For Memorial Day, 50.00 

For Insurance, . I 53-75 

For Snow Paths, 5.5(3 

For Fire Department, 28.00 

For Sinking, 861.67 

For Cemeteries, 100.00 



23 

For Street Lights, 621.65 

For Town Officers, 1,135.25 

For Contingent Expenses, 888.46 

$14,547.70 



24 

LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECT 
MEN, MARCH i, 1906. 



O. Stanley Graves, 
Thomas Vv. Rysn, 
John Den 1 e in, 
Edgar H. Field, 
Charles D. Harris, 
John J. Stengline, 
John F. O'Dea, 
Nelson Allair, 
Henry H. Kingsley, 
George Saffer, 



Charles S. Shactuck, 
Alvin L. Strong, 
Harry E. Graves, 
George M. Donaldson, 
Frank L. Batzold, 
George A. Billings, 
Michael W. Boyle, 
Joseph S. Wells, 
iMichael Kiley, 
John F. Leary, 



Charles E. 'Pfierrer 



M. J. RYAN, 
C. L. GRAVES, 
C. H. CRAFTS, 



Selectmen of Hatfie!< 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
selectmen and find them correct. 

E. B. DLCKINSON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, March 2, 1906. 



Treasurer's Report. 



Roswell Billings, Treasurer, in Account with the Town 
of Hatfield. 



DR. 



To Balance on Hand, 

To Cash 'Received from J. S. Wells, Collector 

To Cash Received from D. W. Wells, Treasurer 

of W. C, 
To Cash Received from City of Northampton, 

(pauper acct.) 
To Cash Received from Error in Account with W. 

Com., 1904, 
To Cash Received from B. & M. Railroad, rebate 
To Cash Received from Buffalo Pitts Steam 

Roller Co., 55-50 

To Cash Received from Dist. Court, Fines and 

Forfeitures, 
To Cash Received from J. E. Clark, Jailer, 
To Cash Received from City of Northampton, 

Tuition, 
To Cash Received from City of Boston, Tuition, 
To Cash Received from Pool License, 
To Cash Received from State for Supt. of 

Schools, 400.00 



$ 


1,296.80 




17,645-13 




3,000.00 




8.00 




56.3^ 




5.00 



5.0 ) 


50.00 


28.91 


14-50 


2.00 



26 

To Cash Received from School Fund, 7 2 3-59 

To 'Cash Received from County Refunding of Dog 
Fund, 

To Cash Received from State Corporation Tax, 

To Cash Received From iBoard of Charity, 
Tuition, 

To Cash Received from Nat. Bank, Tuition, 

To Cash Received from State Aid, 

To Cash (Received from St. '.Railway Tax, 

To Cash Received from Jose Parker & iCo., (note) 

To Gasih Received from Jose Parker & Co., Pre- 
mium,' 

To Cash Received from C. R. Burt, Sidewalk 
Acct., 

To Cash Received from :Hugh McLeod, Sidewalk 
Acct., 

To Cash Received from «S. W. Kings le; Sidewalk 
Acct., 

To Cash Received from F. Melinoski, Sidewalk 
Acct., 

To Cash Received from L. H. Kingsley, Sidewalk 
Acct., 

To Cash Received from Conn. Valley St. Railway 
Co., for encroachment of 'Pole Line on High- 
way, 

To Cash from Rent ol Town Hall, 

To Cash from Sale of Chemical Ergine, 

TO CASH RECEIVED FROM TEMPORARY 'LOANS. 

First National Bank, 2 mo. Inst, 5 per cent, $1,000 
Jose Parker & Co., 8 mo. Inst., $3.67, 5,000 

M. J. Ryan, Treas. of S. F., . 1,020 

7,020.00 

$37*435-37 



159.9b 


373-89 


19.50 


1,037.31 


44.00 


196.92 


5 ,000.00 


14.60 


8.32 


33.9 s 


3376 


9-51 


31-75 


25.00 


31.00 


5.00 



27 

CR. 

By Cash Paid Selectmen's Orders, $14,547.70 

?By Cash Paid School Committee's Orders, 6,131.00 

By Cash Paid Inst, on Water Bonds, 1,920.00 
By Cash Paid Holyoke Savings Bank, Pine 

Bridge Acct., 1,000.00 
iBy Cash Paid Jose Parker & Co., Bradstreet Fill 

Acct., 600.00 

By Cash Paid Interest Temporary Loans, 148.53 

By Cash Paid Interest Outstanding Loans, 112.00 

By Cash Paid County Tax, . 2,401.11 

By Cash Paid Dist. Court, [Fees and Expenses, 2 5-30 

(By Cash Paid State Tax, 1,720.00 

By Cash Paid Repairs State Highway, 6.34 

Balance in Treasury, 1,803.08 

BY CASH PAID TEMPORARY LOANS. 

First National Bank, $1,000 

Jose Parker & Co., 5,000 

M. J. Ryan, Treas. of S. F., 1.020 

— ■ 7,020.00 



$37,435-27 

IN ACCOUNT WITH J. S. WELLS, COLLECTOR. 

1900. 

DR. 
To Uncollected Taxes, $ 73.40 

OR. 

By Uncollected Taxes, 734° 



23 

1903 ACCOUNT. 

To Cash Received, 138.64 

To Assessors' Order of Abatement, 140.88 



OR. 

By Uncollected Taxes, 265.58 

By Interest Collected, I 3-94 



1904 ACCOUNT. 

DR. 

To Cash Received, $1,670.61 

To Assessors' Order of Abatement, 102.57 

To Uncollected Taxes, 226.05 



CR. 



By Uncollected Taxes, 1,984.64 

By Interest Collected, 14.95 



1905 ACCOUNT. 

DR. 

To Cash Received, $1 5,835.88 

To Uncollected Taxes, 1,200.00 

To Discount on Taxes, 251.34 

By Assessors' Order of Abatement, 17-56 



279-5 



279.5; 



1,999.23 



1,999.2 



17,304.78 



29 



OR. 

By Assessors' Warrant, 17.044.75 

(By Addition to Warrant, 228.91 

By Interest 'Collected, 3 XI 7 



17,304-7^ 



37.00 


36-50 


93-52 


187.78 


1,630.73 


172.35 



3,583.9^ 



SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT. 
DiR. 
OR. 

By Uncollected Taxes, $1,426.05 

By Due from State /Pauper .Account, 

By Due from State Aid, 

By Sidewalks Assessments, 1904, 

By Sidewalks Assessments, 1905, 

By Balance in Treasury Town, 

By Balance in Treasury, School Acct.. 

OUTSTANDLNG NOTES. 

DR. 

Jose Parker & Co., Bradstreet Fill Acct. $1,200 
Jose Parker & Co., Depot Road Acct., 5,000 

6,200 

WATER FUND. 
DR. 

Thirty Years 4 Per Cent Water Bonds, $48,000 



30 

OR. 

Sinking Fund, $9,380.59 

I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer and find them correct. 

E. B. DICKINSON, Audito 
Hatfield, March 7, 1906. 



Water Commissioners' Report. 



The following is respectfully submitted as the tenth an- 
nual report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows : — 

Balance of cash from last year's account,. $ 37.22 

Cash from collection of Water Rates, 3,690.15 

From Connections and Material, 22.50 



$3,749.87 j £ 



We have paid the past year as follows: — 

Town Treasurer ,for water rates, 
ITa4^'^7THuTrty-lor-xoJl££j;io4*s , 
M. J. Proulx for collections, 
Labor and Cash paid by 'Superintendent^ 
Norwood Engineering Co., Service Boxes, 1 
Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., Supplies, 
W. H. Riley, Material and Labor, 
Northampton Water Works, Castings, 
D. W. Wells, Deeds of Land and Expenses, 
Lorenz Doppmann, Deed and Expenses, 
Balance Cash on Hand, 



There are now 299 connections with private property, 82 
hydrants for fire protection, five water tanks, water in five 
school building's and in Memorial Hall. 



$3000.00 


53-85 


56.42 


104.83 


11.40 


39-7^ 


45-38 


10.09 


252.63 


127.00 


48.53 


$3749-8/ 



32 

No extension of 'the pipe line 'has been made the past 
year. 'We have purchased during the year from the heirs o? 
the late Roswell Billings and from Lorenz Do.ppmaiin abou 
sixteen acres of land on both sides of Running Gutter Brook, 
at a cost of $379. The town now owns the land on both 
sides of the Brook a'bove the 'Reservoir northerly to land of 
George A. '.Billings, forty acres in all, and with 18 4-5 miles 
of pipe making the cost of the system to March 1st, 1906, 
$53,652.32. 

C. L. WARNER, 
DANIEL W. WELLS, 
M. J. PROUILX, 

Hatfield Water Commissioners. 

I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Board of Water Commissioners and fin i 
them correct. 

E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 1st, 1906. 



Town Clerk's Report. 

The Vital Statistics for the Town of Hatfield for the ye; 
905 are as follows : 

BIRTHS iBiY MONTHS. 







No. 


Males 


Females 


January, 




1 





t 


February, 




8 


5 


3 


March, 




7 


2 


5 


April, 




HI 


6 


c 


May, 




5 


T 


4 


Tune. 




1 


T 





July, 




3 


2 


T 


August, 




3 


2 


j. 


September, 




7 


5 


2 


October, 




6 


/ 4 


2 


NV>v ember, 




9 


4 





December, 




2 





2 


Total 




63 


32 


31 




BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS. 








No. 


Father 


Mothet 


Born in the United States 


24 


24 


22 




Poland, 


28 


28 


28 


G 


ermany, 


2 


2 


2 


V 


Hungary, 


5 


5 


5 




Ireland, 


2 


2 


2 




Canada, , 


2 


2 


2 


Total 




63 


63 


6j 



34 



BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 
1900 1901 1902 1903 1 004 



36 46 49 47 52 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. 

No. 

January. 2 

February. 2 

Apr:'. I 

May, 5 

June. * 2 

July, r 

August, . 2 

September. 2 

October, 2 

November, 11 

Total 30 

First marriage of both parties 29 

Second marriage of bride, first 01 groom. 1 

3° 
The oldest and youngest grooms were 36 and 21 years 

of age respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were ^2 and 18 years o r 

age respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED. 

Groom Bride 

Born in the United States 
Poland 
Ireland 



13 


H 


16 


16 


I 





.30 


30 



35 



MARRIAGES FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 

I9OO I9OI I902 I903 IQO_L 
20 2% 21 24 17 

DEATHS BY (MONTHS. 



January, 
February, 
March 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July. 
August. 
September, 
October, 
Xovemebr. 
December. 



X'o. 


■Males 


Females 


3 


3 





1 


1 





5 


4 


1 


5 


2 


3 


4 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 


3 





2 


1 


1 


3 


T 


2 


3 


I 


2 


T 


T 






Total, 



34 



22 



12 



No. 



Under 1 year of age 


"7 
/ 


Between 1 and 5 years. 


4 


Between 5 and 10 years 





Between 10 and 20 years 


2 


Between 20 and 30 years 


2 


Between 30 and 40 years 


2 


Between 40 and 50 years 


1 


Between 50 and 60 years 


■ 5 


Between 60 and 70 years 


4 


Between 70 and 80 years 


4 



•Males 


F. 


emalcs 


4 




3 


2 




2 










2 







2* 







j 




1 


1 







4 




T 


1 




3 


4 








36 

Between 80 and 90 years* 211 

Between .80 and 90 years 1 o 1 

34 22 12 

Age of the oldest person deceased (female) 94 years. 

CAUSES OF DEATH. 

Classified according to the nomenclature adopted by. the 
State Board oi Registration. 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 

Diphtheria ■ . • \ J 

Measles, •• -. -,,-2 

Cholera Infantum, ;.-. r i 

Malarial Fever, -= ......; 1 

•CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 



Cancer, 1 

Disease Heart, 6 

Meningitis, 1 

Angina Pectoris, 2 

Phthisis-Pulmonalis, 1 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Strangulated Hernia, t 

Peritonitis, I 

Pneumonia, 4 

Nephritis, t 

DEVELOPMENTAL -DISEASES. 

Gastralgia, " T 
Old Age, - ■•>,-■. 1 

Infantile Debility, I 



37 



Mental and Physical Debility 
Stillborn, ' 

Tetanus, Punctured Wound, 
D r o w n i ng , A c c id ent a 1 , 



Total. 



34 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED. 



Frederick P. Pease, 
William Hayes, 
Michael J. Ca'hijl, 
Henry J. Raboin, 
William H. Dickin >oii, 
Eurotas Morton. 
Mary Boyle, 
Samuel Fusick, 
Thomas T. McGrath, 
Misczystag Sadowski, 
John Caikoski, 
Stanislaw Zebbroski, 
Harry N, Hunt, 
George C. Fitch, 
Sidonia Vollinger, 



Louis Raboin, 
Rebecca J. Cutter, 
Blanche Towmise, 
Albine Zembroski, 
Charles S.Thayer. 
Joseph Merrick, 
E. Lucelia Wells, 
John H. Sanderson, 
Henry R. Graves, 
William Barnes, 
Mary Lizak, 
Fidelia A. Morton, 
Elizabeth Lamontange, 
Mary K. Wolgram, 
John H. Manchester. 



DOG LICENSES. 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending 
November 30, 1905, with ,the receipts and settlement of the 
account with the County Treasurer, is as follows: — 

101 Male Dogs, at $2.00 each, $202.00 

3 Female Dogs at $5.00 each 15.00 

■ $217.00 

Less fees 104 dogs at 20 cents each, 20.8c 



Amount paid County Treasurer June 1 
and December 1, 1905, 



$196,201 



38 

Amount received for dog licenses for the five previous years. 
1900 1 901 1902 1903 1904 



$204 $221 $211 $204 $208 

Respectfully submitted, 

L.H. KINOSI^EY, Town Clerk. 



Assessor's Report. 



Total value of Assessed Estate, $1,394,191 

Value of Assessed Real Estate, $1,013,188 

Value of Assessed Personal Estate, 381,003 

$1,394,191 



Value of Assessed Buildings, $548,583 

Value of Assessed ; Eand, 464,605 



$1,013,188 



Number of .Male Polls Assessed, 650 

Number of residents assessed on property, 331 

All others (corporations, etc.) 30 

—361 
No. of Non-Residents assessed on property 60 

All others, 13 

— 76 

No. of persons assessed on property 434 

No. of persons assessed for Poll Tax only, 3183 

— 817 

Rate of Total Tax, per $1000, $1.1.30 

Num'ber of horses assessed, (two mules) 474 

(Number of Cows assessed, 342 

Number of Neat Cattle, 43 

Number of Swine, 17 

Number of Fowls, 1228 

Number of Dwelling houses assessed, 318 

State Tax, $1,726.34 

County Tax, 2,401.11 



40 

Town Grant, 112,6215.00 

Overlaying^, 292.25 



-$17,044.70 



Conn. Valley St. R. Co. Ex. Tax, - . .• . ,...« 153.20 
Greenfield & Amherst l R. Co. Tax, 27.02 

Northampton & Amherst R. Co. Tax, 61.33 



$2(41.55 



$17,286.25 
Estimated Bank and Corporation Tax, 1,200.00 

Value of property exempt from taxation, Chapter 12, 
Section 5, Revised Eaws : 

Eiterary institutions, $67,458.21 

Church property, 27,000.00 

^$94,458.21 

Estimated value of Public (Buildings, 
Cemeteries, Water Works, Fire Ap- 
paratus, and Sinking 'Fund, $89,600 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN VOELINIGER, 
JAMES iL, DAY, 
L. H. KINiOSEEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



Report of Sinking: Fund 
Commissioners. 



We have', the following amounts deposited to the credit 
of the Sinking Fund : — 

Amherst Savings Bank, $1,417.42 

Northampton Institution for Savings, 1,27206 

Haydenville Savings Bank, 1,138.96 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, i,222^jy 

Florence Savings Bank, 1,085.79 

Greenfield Savings Bank, 1,008.91 

The Franklin Savings Institution, 1,000.00 

Easthampton Savings iBank, 234.68 

Town of Hatfield Water Bond, 1,000.00 



$93&0-59 
M. J. RYAN, 

R. M. WOODiS, 

E. S. WARRAN, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 

I have this day examined the vouchers of the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

E. B. 'DICKINSON, Auditor. 

Hatfield, March 2, 1906. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE- 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



-OF THE- 



Town of Hatfield 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE- 



YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, J 906 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

HENRY S. HUBBARD, Chairman, 1906. 

-LAWIRENCE A. POWERS, Secretary, 1907 
JOHN J. BATZO'L'D, 1908. 

W1IXIAM H. CUMMINGS, Supt. 
iM. H. BOWMAN, Supt. 



Truant Officers* 



William H. Cumings, Joseph S. Wells and John M. Strong. 

Authorized to sign Certificates for children between the 
ages of 14 and 16. 

M. H. BOWMAN. 



School Census, Sept 1, J 905* 

Number of boys between the ages o;f 5 and 15, 14T 

Number of girls between the ages of 5 and 15, 113 



Total, 254 

Number of boys between the ages of 7 and 14, 114 

Number of girls between the ages of 7 and 14, 8 1 , 

Total, 195 



REPORT. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Balance in Treasurer's hands from 1905, $ 156.83 

Town ■Appropriation, 4,200.00 

Town Appropriation Tuition Smith Academy, 500 .co 

Dog Fund, . 159-0 

State 'Board of Charities Tuition, i°oO 

School iFuncl, State, 723.89 

State Funds for Superintendent, ■ 400:00 

City of Boston Tuitions, 14.50 

City of Northampton Tuitions, 128.91 



$6,303.31 



ORDERS DRAWN ON THE TOWN TREASURER. 

Nora M. Connery, • $120.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, 338.00 

Carrie H. Warner, 353-00 

Lillian I. Proulx, 312.00 

Katherine W. Day, 360.00 

Mary E. Breor, 354-00 

Margaret A. Allaire, 120.00 

Jessie D. Penniman, 360.00 

Julia Cummings, 4.00 

Arvilla Sampson, 10.00 



45 



Catherine E. Maloney. 6.00 

Bessie M. Felton, 216.00 

Mrs Arabel F. Forbes, 220.00 

Lillian V. Whiting, Drawing Teacher, 41.66 

Lila B. Hutchins, Drawing Teacher, 83.34 

Uraina G. Barrows, Music Teacher, 170.00 

R. M.., Woods, Treas., Tuition Smith Academy, 500.00 

(Howard & Smith, Coal, x 94-37 

G...H. Danforth, Coal, 95.73 

A. L. Strong, Wood, 70.50 

H. S. Hubbard, Drawing Coal, 12.50 

Conn. Valley: St. Railway Co., tickets for scholars, 132.50 

Splititng and Pileing wood, 4.10 

John M. Strong, Wood, 6.00 

Care of Buildings, 271.60 

Teachers for Attending Teachers' Meetings, 33. 10 

School Supplies, Books, Paper, etc., 469.70 

W. H. Cumings, Superintendent, 240.00 

M. H. Bowman, Superintendent, 246.00 

Shumway & Riley, Repairs, 22.08 

•W,-)H. Riley & Co., Repairs, 7.95 

E, M. Graves, Repairs, 22.46 
(Louis A. Armes, Repairs, 10.60 
.Daniel Lynch, Repairs, 15.00 
Merrick Lumber Co., Flooring, 50.87 
Merrick Lumber Co., Lumber, 14.32 
John J. Betsold, Repairs, Drawing Coal, etc., 84.26 

F. L. Betsold, Floor, West Hatfield, 24.50 
M. J. Ryan, Mdse., 347 
Oscar Belden ■& Sons, Care of School Yard, 10.00 
L. A. Powers, Care of School Yard, 11.00 
L. A. Powers, Labor and Supplies, 21.25 
L. A. Powers, School Committee and State Report, 20.00 
John J. Betsold, School Committee and State Report 15.00 
H. S. Hubbard, Setting Glass, 1.50 



46 

T. S. Wells, Truant Officer, 10.00 



$6,131.21 
Balance of School Fund in Treasury, 172.10 

The above report includes all bills belonging to the 
School Department for the year ending March 1, 1906. 

We have placed new adjustable seats and desks in one 
room of the Center School Building. A new floor in the 
Grammar Room at West Hatfield, and have put in several 
slate blackboards in different buildings the past year. 

At the commencement of the fall term we found so 
many new scholars that were coming into our primarv 
schools that our rooms would not hold them, so we thought 
best to take the fourth grade from the Center and Hill 
Hill Schools and place it with the fifth grade in one room in 
the Center Building, and the seventh and eighth in the Hill 
Building, that made it necessary to take the sixth grade to 
Bradstreet, there being no place for it in this part of the 
town, as we had no money to fit up another room for them. 
We would suggest that the town fit up a room in Smith 
Academy, and put the eighth and ninth grades into it, but 
that would require one more teacher. We think that would 
relieve the other buildings, for a time at le^t. Some such 
arrangements must be made as we do not like the transport- 
ing of children on the cars. 

For the School Committee, 

HENRY S. HUBBARD, 

Chairman. 



47 



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Superintendent's Report. 



To the School Committee of Hatfield. 

I have the honor of presenting to you my first annual 
report of the schools of the town of Hatfield. It also includes 
the usual statistics, and the reports of the supervisor of 
music and the supervisor of drawing. 

At this time I desire to recognize the excellent work of 
my predecessor, Mr W. H. Cummings, to whom I am in- 
debted for a fair share of my pleasant association in school 
work. And I also wish to recognize, in this public manner, 
the faithful services of each teacher. Unless the instructcr, 
who has daily charge of the school, be faithful, thorough, 
and tactful, supervision must largely fail. Although my 
term of service in this district has been limited in time, yet I 
have learned to appreciate the efficiency of the teachers, 
who quietly and yet with enthusiasm and gladness, are surei) 
bringing the schools up to a true standard of excellence. 

During the year that has just closed there have been 
the usual problems to solve, difficulties to overcome, and 
plans to form for successful school' woric. There has been 
about the usual number of resignations in the teaching force, 
and also a change in the supervisors of drawing. Respectful 
attention is called to the excellent work of the specialists in 
music and drawing in this district. Emphasis is laid on the 
tact that our schools are doing more than merely marking 
time and spending money on these departments. We are 
getting a full return for the money we pay. This is true 
not only in respect to the personal of the instructors, but 



5* 

also in the sound and broad principles that are constantly 
■D e i n g e m p h a s i z e d . 

As we study the problem of teachers, during the passmg 
years, it is pleasing to observe, that the parents and com- 
munity at large are increasingly appreciating the efforts of 
those that stand so close to the home and are so intimately 
associated with all that makes for the welfare of the nano'n. 
Yet the teacher receives far lower wages than any other 
professional class. This practice ought not to obtain be- 
cause our schools cannot afford to have anything save the 
best, When it is recalled that we expect and demand not 
only an educated but a trained teacher, who was reared in a 
cultured home, and in addition to her other attainments has 
a fair knowledge of music and drawing, we must not be sur- 
prised that successful experienced teachers are difficult to 
secure. Average wage of female teachers per month in this 
state is $55.37; in Hampshire county is $45.97, : n towti of 
Hatfield is £35.25* 

Careful observation in the different schools of the town 
lends to the conclusion that there is too grea't an inequality 
in the grades. Too frequently pupils of a certain class are 
said to belong to such a grade; when in fact they are con- 
siderably below the true standard. To overcome tbi^ de- 
ficiency teachers are making an earnest effort; and at end of 
school year we hope to secure fair results. A fruitful source 
of this condition has been the promotion of pupils that 
were not properly prepared. An ultimate result must necess- 
arily be a ninth grade pupil that is not well prepared fo 1 * en- 
trance upon high school work. This consequence is far 
reaching. It conditions the whole high school course. Furth- 
ermore., it compels the high school to graduate a scholar 
that is not quite as proficient as he ought to be to enter col- 
lege or technical school by certificate. The uppermost 
thought in mind of parent < nd teacher ought to 1; : the educa- 
tion oi the child as rapid 1 y as possible, consistent wr,h the 
well-being of the child. To secure this result the parent 



52 

and teacher must work in harmony. The parent must insist 
upon the pupil being regular in attendance and frequently 
must sacrifice somewhat to the end that the child miy be 
ecucattd. Again, the home must be in healthful sympathy 
with youthful development. Books and papers should be in 
abundant evidence and it ought not to be expected that the 
child can lead a double .life, doing one day's work in schoo" 
and another between times at home. 

Each year it becomes more evident, not to school offi- 
cials and teachers only, but to young men and women who 
leave the home roof to make their way in the great world, 
that all industries are becoming more complicated and that 
success is largely a survival of the best educated and most 
highly trained. This is more apparent as we ascend the 
scale of desirable employment. In order to successfully meet 
this increasing demand, our children must be equipped with 
all the education that the modern school can give. In busi- 
ness it is no longer a contest between men that have been 
graduated from the district school but a rivalry between men 
that hold a university diploma. Whifie we would gladly re- 
tain all that is desira'ble of the simplicity of life as manifested 
in the years of the past, yet we properly covet for our child- 
ren not only a high position in the world's estimate of suc- 
cess, but the ability to win that position unaided. There is 
no way in which we can aid the young so quickly and surely 
as in insisting that they be regularly at school and studious 
in their habits. The child of normal health and properly 
develloped physical and mental powers can begin his school 
life at five or six years of age and he graduated from the 
high school at eighteen. This much of education every pupil 
in our town should aim to obtain, and the parents ought to 
be eager to sacrifice enough of time and money that each 
son and daughter may enjoy such advantages. 

An examination of the school registers leads to the con- 
clusion that far too small a number of parents visit any 
school. This is the opposite of what ought to obtain. Fre- 



53 

quent visits by the parents would encourage the teacher and 
pupils and would afford an opportunity to observe the daily 
work of the school. Such visits should not be confined to 
any special day of the term or year. The aim should be to 
secure knowledge of the school work. A most cordial in- 
vitation is hereby extended* to afil parents and citizens ot the 
town to visit the schools frequently. Wihile the work in 
progress may not be ideal yet it will be real. And we think 
that frequent inspections will indicate that reasonable pro- 
gress is being made. Furthermore the superintendent an:l 
teachers need the advice, sympathy and co-operation of every 
parent. 

Occasionally the thought is entertained that the schools 
are expensive. And sometimes when financial retrenchment 
must be made it begins at the school department. But as all 
departments of a city or town demand money the educational 
is not an exception. We believe the school appropriations 
should be and are carefully guarded and used. But as occa- 
sion demands the expenses of this department slightly vary 
from year to year. This is caused" by the endeavor to keep 
pace with all that is most helpful to the school. It must 'be 
remembered that school materia' not only wears out rapidly 
but with equal rapidity becomes obsolete. 'During tne year 
effort has been made to keep fully abreast with modern de- 
mands and yet in some respects to slightly lower the ex- 
penditure. This paragraph is not written to call especial at- 
tention to this fact, but to emphasize the more important idea 
that wise and generous appropriation should be made for the 
schools of the town. 

Since in previous reports attention has been called to 
the annual school exhibit, further emphasis has not been 
thought necessary. Such an exhibit is due to be held in 
Hatfield at seme date in latter part of spring term, if which 
special notice will be given. It is to be hoped that parents 
will be interested in such a representation. An earnest et- 



54 

fort will be made :o give a fair and trutMul presentation crt 
school work. 

In closing I desire to express to you, the members of 
the School Board, my appreciation of your kindness, help- 
fulness and the confidence you have had in me. I thank the 
teachers who have so faithfully co-operated with me in the 
school work. I am indebted also to the -citizens for their 
loyalty to the schools and their judicious counsel. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MORTIMER iN. BOWMAN. 

Superintendent of School* 



RESIGNATIONS AiND TRANSFERS. 

Hill Grammar- — Margaret A. Allair, resigned. 
West Grammar — Katherine W. D ! ay, transferred to Hill 
Grammar. 

; Bradstreet — Nora M. IConnery, resigned. 

SCHOOL CALENDAR. 

(Common Schools.) 

Spring Term (12 weeks) April 2 — June 22. . 
Fall Term (15 weeks) Sept. 5, — Dec. 21. 
Winter Term (8 weeks) Jan. 7 — March 8. 
Recess— Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of Thanks- 
giving week. 



Report of Supervisor of Drawing 



Mr. M. H. Bowman, Superintendent of Schools : 

It is with considerable gratification that we observe the 
growing interest in art and art education. Educators of the 
present day are putting more and more stress upon the sub- 
ject, which was considered unimportant not many years ago, 
but some of us still feel that its great importance as an edu- 
cational factor has not yet been fully recognized. 

The study of art is a study of the beauties and sublimities 
of nature ; not a code invented by man, but laws and princi- 
ples w ; hich were created with the universe, and which will 
endure, unchanging, through all time. We have nature, a 
perfect example, forever before us, and there is no excuse 
for our being ignorant of her principles. While we are delv- 
ing among books and relics of remote ages, seeking for hid- 
Mr. M. H. Bowman, Superintendent of Schools, 
den truths, truth and beauties, incomparable, pass before 
our eyes unseen and uninterpreted. 

We consider that man illiterate who is ignorant of the 
principles which have been determined by use, yet we have 
no word of censure for him who has no knowledge of the 
principles and laws of appearance and design. And the man 
who can express his thought in drawing is rare. 

How many papers or magazines would publish articles 
containing glaring grammatical errors ? And yet they have 
no scruples against reproducing illustrations and designs 
impossible in perspective, poor in composition and atrocious 



57 



hi drawing. T:he rarity" of good things in art and the great 
abundance of the bad, increase the difficulty of art education. 

In my teaching I endeavor to make the work attractive 
and interesting, but I do not attempt to make the child fee] 
that the drawing period is playtime, nor is it my purpose •./to 
amuse and entertain him. Both the teachers and the child- 
ren should feel the seriousness of the work and realize that 
it is as important, if not more important, than any other 
study. It is the knowledge that will be of most worth out 
of school, will come closer to the daily life; its influence, 
toward cultivation and refinement is without parallel; it ele- 
vates the taste, and when you have created the right taste, 
you have made for character. 

In my work I have discovered two very serious faults 
which we have made every effort to correct. One was a 
disregard for characteristics of growth, especially for the 
character and formation of stems, and the other the lack of 
improvement in the upper grades. Up to the fifth grade the 
work showed the improvement expected from grade to grade 
but above that it was very slight. I attributed this to the fact 
that the children did not know how to study, so we have 
bent our energies upon teaching them, which means simply, 
TO USE THEIR EYES. Children in the seventh, eighth 
and ninth grades should be abk\ to make car ful botanical 
studies of plants and flowers, b'lt ours were unable even to 
reproduce the size or shape of a spray. In cases where the 
spray was six or more inches long, the majority of draw- 
ings would average three inches. When a child was given 
a spray of five or six large leaves, I have not infrequently 
counted 15 or 20 small ones in his drawing. There are some 
things that do not depend upon a special talent for drawing, 
and every child should be able to reproduce the correct size 
of a plant, and the number of leaves. I have found it nec- 
essary to limit the use of the brush which tended to care- 
lessness and to work largely with the lead pencil, whicn is the 
true study medium. A drawing poorly made in color is at- 



58 

tractive, but a badly executed drawing in lead pencil has no 
redeeming qualities, and the child can see.it. In the spring 
we shall take up color again and hope to do good work. 

Children should be taught drawing as carefully and as 
systematically as any other subject. They should be given 
reasons for doing things and should ibe taught the funda- 
mental principles underlying the different phases of art, 
which they are studying. The subject then becomes intelli- 
gent. We do not hope or even attempt to make artists, but 
we do hope to teach what good art is, and its all importance 
to life; we hope to arouse a love for and an appreciation of 
the beautiful ; to lead the child to enjoy producing a good 
thing with his hand and brain combined. 

I wish to'tihank the teachers for their hearty co-operation 
with me in the work. I feel that without exception, they ha ve 
done all in their power to make it interesting and successful 
and to carry out my wishes. The children also, are interested 
in their work, and I am not sure but they would prefer a 
drawing lesson even to arithmetic. Their interest and en- 
thusiasm makes the teaching a pleasure. 

"Some day we shall win fcack art again to our daily labor , ; 
win back art, that is to say, the pleasure of life to the people.' 7 

LIT.A B. (HTJTCHI'NS. 



Vocal Music 



Mr. M. H. Bowman, Superintendent of Schools: 

The use of the course of study introduced last year has 
been continued. 

The faithful work of the regular teachers is reaping 
results. The schools are nearer being up to grade than they 
were one year ago. 

The growth in the ability to read the language en- 
ables us to spend more time in seeking the expression of the 
.finished product. Consequently more song work has been 
accomplished. This ratio will increase as we advance to- 
ward a higher standard in the rudimentary drill. 

Beside the regular drill in learning to read music, the 
primary grades are singing rote songs, the intermediate 
grades are learning to sing by note two-part songs and ex- 
ercises, The grammar grades are learning to sing by note 
three-part songs. 

Supplementary song books have been introduced into 
some of the rooms with gratifying results. 

Again I would express earnest appreciation of the 
faithful work of the teachers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

URANIA G. BURROWS. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 




FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, 1907 



Northampton, Mass. 

Press of Herald Job Print 

1907 



Articles in the Warrant for Town Meeting, 
March 18, 1907. 



Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To choose all necessary Town Officers for the 
ensuing year including one member of the Board of Water 
Commissioners for three years, one member of the School 
Committee for three years, one member of the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners for three years, one member of 
the Library Trustees for three years, one Elector under the 
Will of the late Oliver Smith, Esq. To vote on the question 
"Yes or No" shall license be granted for the sale of intoxica- 
ting liquors in this town for the ensuing j^ear. 

Article 3^ To revise and accept the list of Jurors reported 
by the Selectmen. 

Article 4. To hear the reports of the various Town Offi- 
cers and act thereon. 

Article 5. To receive and pass on Town Accounts. 

Article 6. To take action in relation to maintenance and 
repairs of highways and bridges for the ensuing year. 

Article 7. To take action in relation to raising money to 
defray the necessary expenses of the Town for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 8. To see what action the Town will take in 
relation to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Article 9. To see if the Town will make an appropria- 
tion for Memorial Day. 



Article 10. To take action in relation to the support of 
the poor for the ensuing year. 

Article 11. To see if the Town will employ a teacher of 
music in the public schools for the ensuing year and make an 
appropriation for the same. 

Article 12. To see if the Town will make an appropria- 
tion for the care of cemeteries for the ensuing year. 

Article 13. To see if the Town will appropriate money 
for the payment of tuition of Hatfield children in Smith Aca- 
demy, who are of suitable age and attainment to attend High 
School. 

Article 14. To see if the Town will make an appropriation 
for repairs on schoolhouses. 

Article 15. To see if the Town will make an appropriation 
for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 

Article 16. To see if the Town will make in appropriation 
for Firemens Muster. ^ 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to employ a 
teacher of drawing in the public schools for the ensuing year 
and make an appropriation for the same. 

Article 18. To authorize the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow during the municipal 
year beginning March 1, 1907, in anticipation of the collection 
of taxes of said year, such sums of money as may be neces- 
sary for the current expenses of the Town but not to exceed 
the total tax levy for said year, giving the notes of the Town 
therefor, payable within one year from the dates thereof, all 
debts incurred under authority of this vote shall be paid trom 
the taxes of the present municipal year. 

Article 19. To see if the Town will make an appropria- 
tion for lighting the public streets the ensuing year. 



Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to build a per- 
manent road of stone or other material from a point opposite 
thh residence of Nelson Allaire on Kim Street to Banks Corner 
so called and raise or appropriate money for the same. 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to build any 
sidewalk on any part of any street and make an ^appropriation 
for the same, the abutters to pajr one-half the cost. 

Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to build any 
permanent roads of stone or other material and raise or appro- 
priate money for the same. 

Article 23. To see if the Town will make an appropria- 
tion for the employment of a School Physician in accordance 
with Chapter 502, Acts of 1906, 

Article 24. To see if the Town will make an appropria- 
tion to provide additional school room in Westbrook school 
building. 

Article 25. To see if the Town will vote to accept trust 
funds (under the provisions of Chapter 78, Section 18, Revised 
L,aws) money left for the care of burial plots in Cemeteries. 

Article 26. To see if the Town will provide in the school 
appropriation for increased Janitor service, so that floors may 
be swept twice a week and the windows washed once a week 
during school term. 

Article 27. To see if the Town will have the walls of 
the school house tinted, green is suggested as a background 
suitable for pictures. 

Article 28. To see if the Town will vote to build a gravel 
or concrete walk from Kingsley's bridge easterly to Main 
Street on the northerly side of said street the abutters to pay 
one-half the cost. 



Article 29. To see if the Town will vote to extend the 
Water Main to the residence of John Kairn and make an 
appropriation for the same. 

Article 30. To see if the Town will vote to recind the 
vote passed March 21, 1902, in regard to highway employees. 

Article 31. To see if the Town will vote to establish a 
price for labor on highway work. 



Selectmen's Report. 



To the Citizens of Hatfield, Mass; 

Gentlemen: — In accordance with the requirements of the 
Public Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for the 
year ending March 1, 1907, is respectfully submitted. 



POOR EXPENDITURES. 

Mrs. F. T, Vining, board of Mary Jane Manchester, 
C. N. Clark, house rent Mrs A. Gendron, 
P. Ahearn & Co., burial John Bak, 
City of Fitchburg, aid rendered M. H. Carleton, 
P. Ahearn & Co., burial Patrick Spean, 
M. J. Ryan, supplies for Margaret O'Neil, 
Chas A. Byrne, medical attendance H. P. Tisdale, 
M. J. Ryan, supplies Mrs. A. Gendron, 
M.J. Ryan, supplies Joseph Prew & family, 
M. J. Ryan, expense John McDermott to Tewksbury 
J. T. Fitzgibbons, wood for Margaret O'Neil, 
City of Northampton, aid rendered Mrs. A. Gendren, 
" " Christiana Wenzel, 

$401 58 
STATE AID. 

Charles R. Crafts, #22 00 

Richard B. Abbott. 25 00 

47 00 



$144 00 


CO 


00 


10 


00 


41 


00 


15 


00 


54 


20 


13 


00 


4 


13 


10 


50 


, 6 


00 


2 


00 


, 24 


65 


17 


10 



MEMORIAL BUILDING. 



Hatfield Gas Co., for gas, 
Howard & Smith, coal, 
L H. Kingsley, janitor, 
E. M. Graves, repairs, 



$22 


97 


63 


11 


75 


00 




75 



161 83 



WATER RATES. 

Hatfield Water Works, 1500 00 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

.Magazine Club, books, 
Margaret A. Mullany, asst. Librarian, 
McClure, Phillips & Co., books, 
H. H. Smith, 
S. E. Bridgman & Co., 
Ruf us. Fuller, 

Henry R. Huntting, " 

Marion E. Billings, cataloging books, 
C. M. Barton, 

C. M. Barton, express, cartage, etc., 
C. M. Barton, librarian, 

$300 00 

STREET LIGHTS. 

Hatfield Gas Co., 406 92 

BONDS FOR TOWN OFFICERS. 

W. M. Cochran & Co., bonds for Treasurer, $24 00 

W. M. Cochran & Co., " Tax Collector, 15 00 

$39 00 



$ 5 


00 


6 


25 


36 


10 


2 


90 


163 


03 


3 


50 


6 


00 


1 


00 


6 


00 


1 


45 


68 


77 



TREE WARDEN EXPENDITURES. 



Wm. Nipton & Co., labor, 


$29 50 


Geo. Eberlain, brace rods, 


33 51 


F. I,; Betsold, labor, 


28 50 


P. J. Whalen, " 1905, 


18 50 


P. J. Whalen, " 


20 75 


P. J. Whalen, cash paid H. J. Kelvey, 


3 00 


E. M. Graves, labor, 


2 00 


W. P. Boyle, paint, 


1 50 



COST OF BUILDING STATE ROAD. 



$137 26 



T. J. Ryan, team and labor, 

James Ryan, " 

H. Shnmway, " 

J. S. Bardwell, 

A. L. Strong, 

W.E.Boyle, 

J. B. Vollinger, 

J. J. Stengline, 

John Adimut, labor, 

P. Brennan, " 

John Priski, 

L. L. Vollinger, 

F. t. Betsold, 

J. Gies, 

F. C. Dugal, 

J. S. Bardwell, 

A. Wickler, 

John Uric, 

H. J. Kilvey, 

Peter Denlein, " 

Geo. Steele, tending lights, 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., stone, 



$ 54 94 

34 48 

162 22 

71 56 

137 62 

88 96 

40 05 

3 50 

17 88 

22 04 

10 50 

6 15 

9 50 

63 42 

69 69 

67 50 

. 22 83 

30 19 

75 

24 75 

6 25 

57 36 



B. & M. R. R., freight on stone, 

John Shane & Sons Co., " 

N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R. Co., demurage, 

K- P. Hall & Co., lumber, 

City of Northampton, Stone, 

Howard & Smith, Coal, 

Howard & Smith, cement, 

A. L. Strong, posts, 

H. P. Converse Co., concrete work, 

B. P. Dwight, sand, 

W. P. Boyle, painting fence, 
M. J. Ryan, Supt., 



Amount to receive from State, as per 

contract, $3,792 74 

Amount received sale of stone, 10 00 

Amount received from N.Y.N.H. & H.R.R. 6 00 
Value of stone stacked, 30 00 

Received from other sources, 150 00 



27 


57 


1,225 


32 


15 


00 


20 


68 


3 


50 


39 


72 


7 


15 


10 


68 


1,088 


87 


73 


75 


22 


14 


150 


00 



1,686 52 



,3,988 74- 



13,686 52 



STEAM ROLLER. 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co. 3,250 00 

BUILDING CONCRETE WALK ON ELM STREET. 

T. J. Ryan, team and labor, $ 36 75 

H. Shumway, <<<<<« 21 00 

A. Brear, " " 14 00 

C. L. Warner, " ' " 10 50 

T. Graves, " " 14 00 

Whalen Bros. - < «< 5 25 



J. Gies, labor 

David I^andry, 

P. Brennan, 

F. C. Dugal, 

J. Mullins, 

J. Whurler, 

D. E. Cahill, 
J. Orman, 
W. Ni'pton, 
J. S. Bar'dwell, 
W. H. Riley & Co., tile, 

E. C. & E. E. Davis, lines and grades, 
J. S. Carl, sand, 

Nelson Allair, sand, 
L S. Stearns, concrete, 



24 00 


15 


00 


28 


50 


15 


00 


2 


50 


9 


75 


6 


75 


21 


00 


2 


25 


3 


50 


13 


00 


16 


80 


6 


00 


14 


65 


883 


20 


#1,163 


49 



PROSPECT STREET WALK, 



J. L. Boyle, team and labor, 

J. S. Bardwell, 

H. Shumway, " 

T. J. Ryan, 

D. Landry, labor, 

P. Brenn n, " 

F. C. Dugal, 

J. Orman, " 

J. Whurler, 

D. E. Cahill, 

J. Gies, 

Frank Wilkie, sand, 



$ 3 


50 


10 


50 


12 


25 


17 


50 




75 


6 


00 


3 


37 


8 


25 


6 


00 


4 


13 


3 


00 


18 


00 



£93 25 



n 



CHESTNUT STREET WALK. 



J. S. Bard well, team and labor, 

H. Shumway, 

J. L. Boyle, 

D. P. Sheehan, 

J. Vollinger, 

J.J. Stengline, 

W. E. Bnyle, * 

J. Gies, labor, 

M. Sperber, labor, 



DRAIN NO. MAIN STREET. 

J. P. Ryan, akron tile, 
B. & M. R. R., freight, 
Howard & Smith, cement, 
W. A. Bailey, brick, 

E. C. & E. E. Davis, lines and grades, 
Norwood Engineering Co., caps and grates, 
James Ryan, team and labor, 

J. Mullins, labor, 

D. K' Cahill, 
A. Wickles, 
J. Gies, 

F. Adakinski, 
John Duboi, 
P. Brennan, 
John Stekinski, 
M. Bick, 
John Smith, 
Tony Stover, 
J. Orman, 



$ 8 


75 


16 


62 


15 


74 


12 


24 


17 


00 


13 


12 


14 


00 


8 


62 


7 


50 



#113 59 



$135 


61 


63 


96 


4 


90 


3 15 


6 


90 


16 


72 


10 


50 


20 


00 


12 


00 


7 


50 


13 


50 


12 


00 


12 


00 


9 


00 


9 


00 


7 


50 


7 


50 


7 


50 


6 


00 



$365 24 



12 



MAKING SNOW PATHS. 

A. Breor, labor, 1905, $ 3 00 

A. Breor, " 1906, 14 00 

A. H. Marsh, labor, 1905, 2 50 

A. H. Marsh, " 1906, 2 50 

W. W. Gore, " " 50 

D. W. Wells, " " 2 80 



EXPENSE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



$25 30 



J. J. Betsold, storing hose wagon, 


$5 00 


C. H. & F. A. Crafts, 


5 00 


T.-H. O'Dea, 


5 00 


F. Winzel, 


5 00 


C. W. Marsh, 


5 00 


J. J. Betsold, care of hose, 


3 00 


C. H. & F. A. Crafts, use of horse, 


2 00 


Whalen Bros, use of horse, 


2 00 



$32 00 

MEMORIAL DAY APPROPRIATION. 
C. D. Bardwell, $50 00 

FIREMEN'S MUSTER APPROPRIATION. 
M. J. Ryan' $75 00 

CEMETERY APPROPRIATION. 
F. H. Bardwell, Treasurer, $100 00 

SINKING FUND APPROPRIATION. 
M. J. Ryan, Treasurer, $861 67 

x 3 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 



H. P. Converse & Co., iron bridge, 

F. B. Bardwell, plank, 

A. L. Strong, lumber and plank. 

K. P. Hall & Co., 

J. P. Ryan, akron tile, 

Howard & Smith, coal, 

M. J. Ryan, hardware, 

Chase & Coolidge, oil. 

John S. Lane & Sons Co., stone, 

H. P. Converse & Co., painting bridge, 

Graves & Pellissier, tile, 

G. B. Morton, plauk, 

F. P. Jones, " 

Iy. H. Kingsley, posts, 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 

T.J.Ryan, 

Mrs. A. Webber, 

J. B. Stoddard, 

D. P. Sheehan, 

A. Brear, 
Whalen Bros. 
J. L. Boyle, 

G. M. Donaldson. 
J. A. Cutter, 

D. W. Wells, 
J. J. Betzold, 

B. W. &S. H. Field," 

C. H. & F. A. Crafts" 
James Ryan, " 
J. S. Bardwell, 
George Chandler, 

W. Fox, 

J. Kairns, 

J. J. Brear, 

W. Coffey, 

W. F. Boyle, 

Richard Fitzgerald 



labor, 



290 


00 


55 


64 


45 


88 


52 


41 


80 


00 


18 


85 


46 


55 


7 


40 


48 


54 


90 


00 




48 


8 


06 


25 


20 


1 


00 


176 


25 


145 


75 


3 


00 


2 


85 


3 


50 


4 


00 


3 


50 


13 


00 


1 


40 


10 


45 


1 


75 


6 


00 


3 


60 


17 


50 


59 


75 


95 


50 


6 


25 


8 


25 


3 


50 


5 


00 


1 


50 


1 


50 




75 



14 



David Powers, labor 

J. Raboin, 

J. Orman, 

D. E. Cahill, 

J. Mullins, 

M. Sperber, 

J. Gier, 

P. Brennan, 

F. C. D u gal, 

A. W. Wolfram, 



TOWN OFFICERS, 

D. W. Wells, Water Commissioner, 
C. E. Warner, 

M. J. *Proulx, 

C. E. Graves, Selectman, 

C. H. Crafts, 

M.J.Ryan, 

J. S. Wells, Tax Collector, 

J. E. Day, Assessor, 

E. H. Kingsley, Assessor, 
John Vollinger, Assessor, 
Roswell Billings, Treasurer, 

W. H. Belden, Registrar of Voters, 

T. W. Ryan, 

S.F.Billings, 

E. B. Dickinson, Auditor, 

E. H. Kingsley, Town Clerk, 

M. J. Ryan, Supt. of Streets, 

B. M. Warner, Moderator, 

C. K. Morton, Elector, 



J. S. Wells, Tax Collector, 1905-06, 



1.5 



1 


00 


3 


50 


13 


25 


9 


75 


8 


75 


9 


75 


87 


00 


34 


25 


11 


25 


1 


50 


81,524 


56 



$ 10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


75 


00 


75 


00 


150 


00 


150 


00 


35 


00 


92 


50 


85 


00 


100 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


5 


00 


300 


00 


250 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


61,386 


50 


300 


00 



$1,686 50 



CONTINGENCIES. 

Herald Job Print, Order Book, 
Herald Job Print, Printing Reports, 
Herald Job Print, Printing School Reports, 
Herald Job Print, Printing Ballots, 
Hatfield Gas Co., gas for Town Hall, 
E. S. Warner, inspecting animals, 

E. S. Warner, inspecting beeves, etc., 

F. H. Sanborn, inspecting boiler, 

J. T. Burke, serving selectmen's warrant, 

Bridgman & Lyman, stationery for Town Clerk, 1904, 

Northampton Daily Herald, publishing notices, 

A. J. Bonneville, disinfecting, 
Metcalf & Co , printing licenses, 

Daily Hampshire Gazette, publishing notices, 
J. I,. & W. K. Potter, sprinkling cart, 

B. & M. R. R., freight on 
S. W. Kingsley, constable, 

repairs on road machine, etc, 
" schoolhouse, 
tl truant officer, 

repairing hydrant, 
A. B. Wolfram, painting hose wagon, 
J. T. Powers, constable, 
J. S. Bardwell, wood for Town Hall, 
W. h. Beaman, sawing wood for Town Hall, 
Silas Porter, for dike occupation, 
M.J. Ryan, cash paid witnesses in Pauper Case, 

Whately vs. Hatfield, 
E. M. Graves, stove and pipe for Town Hall, 
cleaning Town Hall, 
" repairs - " 

moving voting booth, 
Chas. A. Byrne, disinfecting, 

antitoxine treatment, 
exam, for Board of Health, 
returning births, 
A. J. Bonneville, 

i6 



$ 5 


50 


65 


50 


16 


80 


18 


25 


7 


49 


55 


00 


64 


09 


5 


00 


3 


00 


3 


25 


2 


30 


6 


00 


8 


00 


1 


00 


325 


00 


6 


30 


7 25 


8 


55 


4 


65 


2 


00 




60 


5 


00 


2 


00 


15 


00 


2 


10 


5 


00 


18 


70 


33 


90 


5 


95 


1 


81 


3 


00 


20 


00 


8 


50 


1 


00 


8 


00 


7 25 



C. E. Trow, Returning Births, 
W.J.Collins, 
A. H. McCormack, 

D. P. McGrath, Ballot Clerk, 
A. H. Breor, 
F. H. Bardweil, 
Geo. S. Belden, 
C. D. Bardweil, care of town clock, 

" janitor town hall, 

L,. H. Kingsley, copying, recording and indexing 

births, marriages and deaths, 
L,. H. Kingsley, serving selectman's warrant, 

" stationery, postage, express, etc., 

Cecil T. Bagnall, assessor's book, 

" tax bills and dog licenses, 

Henry Johnson, tax collector's book, 
L. G. Stearns, repairing concrete walk on Sc. street, 
M. J. Ryan, cash paid for postage on Town Reports, 
M. J. Proulx, constable, 
A. W. Wolfram, constable, 1905, 
A. J. Bonneville, disinfecting So. street schoolhouse, 
Chas. A. Byrne, disinfecting Hill school building, 

W. Brook «' 
examination of pupils, 
M. J. Ryan, paid on express, etc., 
Howard & Smith, grass seed, 
A. J. Bonneville, med. attendance N. Demarais, 
W. P. Boyle, painting road machine, 



BUILDING TOOL HOUSE. 





50 




50 




25 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 00 


4 


00 


20 


00 


40 


75 


45 


80 


7 


00 


8 


25 


1 


95 


6 


35 


1 


59 


10 


00 


3 


11 


4 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


1 


74 


4 


50 


1 


00 


16 


63 



$962 57 



G. M. Bradford, lumber, $ 52 85 

A. L. Strong, " 27 38 

E. P. Hall & Co. " 138 73 

John Evans, slating, 92 74 



17 



W. H. Riley & Co., smoke stack, 

Frank Wilkie, sand, 

M. J. Ryan, hardware, 

W. P. Boyle, painting, 

F. L. Betsold, labor and material, 



16 


77 


7 


50 


16 


29 


17 


13 


126 


05 



£494 44 



APPROPRIATIONS TO BE EXPENDED BY THE 
SELECTMEN. 



Poor, 


$ 600 00 


Memorial Building, 


150 00 


Water Rates, 


500 00 


Street Lights, 


700 00 


Bonds, Town Officers, 


50 00 


Concrete Walk, Elm Street, 


800 00 


Gravel Walk, Prospect Street, 


100 00 


Gravel Walk, Chestnut Street, 


150 00 


Drain North Main Street, 


350 00 


Memorial Day, 


50 00 


Firemen's Muster, 


75 00 


Cemeteries, 


100 00 


Highways and Bridges, 


2,000 00 


Town Officers, 


1,400 00 


Public Library, 


300 00 


Contingencies, 


1,500 00 


Interest, 


350 00 


Town Debt, 


1.600 00 


Insurance, 


250 00 


Gravel Walk, Westbrook, 


150 00 


Highway Repairs, Bradstreet, 


. 500 00 


Balance in Treasury for Steam Roller, 


3,411 57 


State Road Contract, 


3,792 74 




$18,829 31 



18 



RECAPITATION OF ORDERS DRAWN TO 
MARCH 1, 1907. 



Poor, 

State Aid, 

Memorial Building, 

Water Rates, 

Street Lights, 

Bonds, Town Officers, 

Concrete Walk, Elm Street, 

Gravel Walk, Prospect Street, 

Gravel Walk, Chestnut Street, 

Drain North Main Street 

Memorial Day, Appropriation, 

Firemen's Muster, 

Cemeteries, , 

Highways and Bridges, 

Town Officers, 

Public Library, 

Contingencies, 

Tree Warden Expenditures, 

Tool House, 

Making Snow Paths, 

Fire Department, 

Sinking Fund, 

Steam Roller, 

State Road, 



401 


58 


47 


00 


161 


83 


500 


00 


406 


92 


39 


00 


1,163 


40 


93 


25 


113 


59 


365 


24 


50 


00 


75 


00 


100 


00 


1,524 


56 


1,686 


50 


300 


00 


962 


57 


137 


26 


494 


44 


25 


30 


32 


00 


861 


67 


3,250 


00 


3,686 


52 


$16,177 63 



19 



LIST OF JURORS REPORTED MARCH 1, 1907 



Nelson Allair, 




Oscar Belden, 


George A. Billings, 




Lawrence A. Powers, 


Michael W. Boyle, 




Charles W. Wade, 


George M. Donaldson 




Louis J. Pellissier, 


John Denlein, 




Hugh McLeod, 


0. Stanley Graves, 




John G. Smith, 


Michael P. Kiley, 




Henry H. Kingsley, 


Charles S. Shaltuck, 




John F. Leary, 


Thomas W. Ryan, 




Edgar H. Field, 


Alvin Iy. Strong, 




Charles Pfiefler, 




Joseph S. Wells. 




M 
C. 

C. 


. J. RYAN, ) Selectmen 
L. GRAVES, [ of 
H. CRAFTS, ) Hatfield. 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Selectmen and find them correct. 



E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor. 



Hatfield, March 4, 1907. 



20 



Treasurers Report. 



Roswell Billings, Treasurer, in Account with the Town 
of Hatfield. 

DR. 



To balance on hand, 



Cash rec 



dfrom J. S. Wells, Collector, 

H. K. Belden, 

D. W. Wells, Treas. Water 
Commissioners, 

District Court, fines and for- 
feitures, 

J. T. & W. H. Burke, Liq- 
uor License, 

State, for Supt. of Schools, 

Income of School Fund, 
Corporation Tax, 
National Bank Tax, 
Aid. 

Street Railway, 
Inspection of Animals, 
Repairs State Highway, 
Account State Road, 
Highway Loan Fund, 

B. &M. R.R. P.SheehanAcct. 

J. J. Slattery, 

Pool License, 

B. & M. R. R. rebate, 

City of Boston, tuition, 

City of Northampton, tuition. 



$1,803 


08 


1 370 


38 


18,977 


43 


2,800 


00 


122 


00 


2,000 00 


400 


00 


706 


50 


381 


57 


973 


85 


41 


50 


384 


16 


32 


75 


16 


70 


71 


00 


3,742 


74 


9 


60 


9 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


18 


00 



217 00 



Refunding of Dog Fund, 




145 70 


Sale of School Books, 




1 70 


Sale of Lumber, 




12 57 


Hat. Gas Co., Sidewalk Assessment 


, 3 70 


Mrs. J. Sanderson, 






23 40 


M. H. Burke, 






45 24 


Est. H. N. Hunt, 






5 53 


F. Jubenville, 






47 76 


P. MeGlynn, 






7 67 


C. S. Shattuck, 






22 62 


G. B. Lowell, 






47 29 


C. Iy. Warner, 






73 91 


F. Allaire, 






26 09 


Whalen Bros. ' 






29 74 


J. S. Carl, 






74 47 


W. W. Gore, 






25 00 


Cemetery Lot, 




50 


W. Hatfield, Cemetery Lot, 




3 00 


S. K. Billings, " No. 


138, 


50 


E. B. Hicks, 


59, 


50 


C. D. Bardwell, 


43, 


50 


John Wenzel, y 2 


143, 


50 


C.J. Abbott, E.^ " 


5, 


50 


M. J. Ryan, State Road Acct., 




150 00 


Sale of Tile, 




13 60 


Sale of Logs, 




8 00 


Stone Road, 




10 00 


Rent of Town Hall, 


36 00 



BY CASH REC'D FROM TEMPORARY LOANS. 

First National Bank, 1 mo. Inst, at 5 

per cent, $1,000 00 

Northampton Inst. For Savings, 8 mo. 

Inst. 4% percent., 6,000 00 



$41,007 75 



22 



CR. 

By Cash Paid Selectmen's Orders, 116,477 63 

School Committee Orders, 7,704 38 

Ints. on Water Bonds, 1,920 00 
" Jose Parker & Co., Note, Stone 

Road Acct., 1,000 00 
Jose Parker & Co., Note, Brad- 

street Fill Acct., 600 00 

Interest Temporary Loans, 20127 

" Interest Outstanding Loans, 241 33 

County Tax, 1,832 88 

" Dist. Court Fees and Expenses, 47 66 

State Tax, 1,505 00 

4< Repairs State Highway, 14 40 

State % Liquor License, 500 00 

Insurance, 225 00 

Balance in Treasury, 2,540 70 

BY CASH PAID TEMPORARY LOANS. 

First National Bank, $1,000 00 

Northampton Inst. For Savings, 6,000 00 



$41,007 75 

IN ACCOUNT WITH SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

DR. 

To Cash in Treasury, $ 172 35 

To Appropriation for Schools, 6,750 00 

To Cash received from State for School 

Superintendent, 400 00 

To Cash received from State, Income of 

School Fund, 706 50 

To Cash received from City of Boston, 

Tuition, 18 00 

23 



To Cash received from Cit}' of North- 
ampton, Tuition, 217 00 

To Cash received from Refunding of 

Dog Fund, 145 70 

To Cash received from Sale of Lumber, 12 57 

To Cash received from Sale of Books, 1 70 



$8,423 82 



CR. 



By Cash paid School Com. Orders, 17,704 38 

Balance in Treasury, 719 44 

$8,423 82 

IN ACCOUNT WITH J. S. WELLS, COLLECTOR. 

DR. 

To Cash received, $1,370 38 

To Assessors Order of Abatement, 68 79 

$1,439 17 



CR. 



By Uncollected Taxes, $1,426 05 

By Interest on Taxes, 13 12 



$1,439 17 



IN ACCOUNT WITH H. E. BELDEN, COLLECTOR. 

DR. 



To Cash received, 

To Uncollected Taxes, 

To Discount on Taxes, 

To Assessors Order of Abatement, 



24 



18 977 


91 






1,673 


04 






314 


07 






22 


48 










20.987 


50 



CR. 

By Assessors Warrant, $20,450 53 

By Addition to Warrant, 473 96 

By Interest Collected, 63 01 

20,987 50 

WATER FUND. 
DR. 
To 30 years 4 per cent Water Bonds, #48,000 00 

CR. 
By Sinking Fund, $10,553 70 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT. 
DR. 



CR. 



By Uncollected Taxes, $1,673 04 

By amount due from Sidewalk Ass'mt, 319 73 

State Road Contract 

Inspection of Animals, 

State Aid, 

Conn. V. St. Ry. Co., 
To Balance in Treasury, Town Acct., 

School " 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer and find them correct. 

K. B. DICKINSON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 1, 1907. 

25 



50 00 




27 50 




47 00 




45 00 




1,840 56 




719 44 






4,722 27 



Water Commissioners' Report. 



The following is respectfully submitted as the Eleventh 
Annual Report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past } T ear as follows: 

Balance of Cash from last year's account, $ 48 53 

Cash for collection of Water Rates, - 3.783 89 



$3,832 12 



We have paid the past year as follows: 

Town Treasurer, from Water Rates, 

M. J. Proulx, Supt., for collection Water Rates, 

labor and cash paid by Supt,, 
Norwood Engineering Co., service boxes, 
Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., Hydrants and Supplies, 
W. H.Riley & Co., Supplies, 
Northampton Water Works, Specials, 
Maynard Rubber Corporation, Hose, 
Gazette Printing Company, Billheads, 

C. E. Warner, 272 ft. 1 in. iron pipe, 

A. H. Beers, Surveying land at reservoir, 

D. W. Wells, man one day surveying, 
Balance cash on hand, 



There are now 270 connections with private property, 82 
hydrants for fire protection, 5 water tanks, water in five school 
buildings, and in Memorial Hall. 



$2,800 00 


113 


18 


119 


10 


22 


80 


49 


43 


67 


57 


5 


62 


3 


50 


4 


00 


13 


60 


4 


15 


1 


50 


627 


97 


$3,832 


42 



Two hundred and seventy-two feet of one-inch iron pipe 
has been laid the past year at a cost on the part of the Town 
of $23.55. There is now as follows: 

18,781 feet of 8 inch pipe, 



47,786 


.i 6 


23,853 


" 4 


1,320 


" 2 


6,886 


" 1 


1,070 


- k " 



Total, 99,696 feet of main pipe and forty acres of land 
at the reservoir, making the cost of the system to March, 1st, 
1907, $53,675.87. 



C. Iv. WARNER, 

D. W. WELLS, 
M. J. PROULX, 



Hatfield 

Water 

Commissioners. 



Hatfield, Mass., March 1, 1907. 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Board of Water Commissioners and find them 
correct. 

E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 1, 1907. 



27 



Town Clerk's Report. 



The Vital Statistics for the Town of Hatfield for the year 
1906 are as follows: 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



No. 


Males 


Females 


5 





5 


9 


5 


4 


4 


2 


2 


7 


2 


5 


11 


7 


4 


2 





2 


6 


4 


2 


5 


3 


2 


3 


2 


1 


5 


2 


3 


5 


1 


4 


6 


2 


4 



Total, 



68 



30 



38 



BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS. 





Father 


Mother 


in the United States, 


26 


26 


Poland, 


33 


33 


Germany, 


3 


2 


Hungary, 


5 


5 






1 





1 


1 






Ireland, 
Canada, 
Nova Scotia 



Total, 68 68 

BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS. 
1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 



46 49 47 52 64 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. 

No. 

January, 4 

February, 3 

April, . 6 

May, 2 

June, 4 

July, 2 

August, 1 

September, 1 

October, 5 

November, 4 

Total, 32 

First marriage of both parties, 27 

Second marriage of bride, first of groom, 2 

Second marriage of groom, first of bride, 3 

32 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 42 and 19 years of 
age respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were 40 and 18 years of 
age respectively. 

29 



BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED. 





Groom 


Bride 


tii in the United States, 


11 


12 


Poland, 


13 


11 


Ireland, 


1 





Germany, 


2 





Hungary, 


5 


9 



32 



32 



MARRIAGES FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS. 
1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 



21 



24 



17 



30 



DEATHS BY MONTHS. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 

•Total, 



No. 


Males 


Females 


3 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 











5 


4 


1 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 





3 


1 


2 


3 


3 





2 


1 


1 


1 





1 


3 


2 


1 



27 



18 





No. 


Males 


Females 


Under 1 year of age, 


5 


4 


1 


Between 1 and 5 years, 


2 


1 


1 


Between 5 and 10 years, 


1 


1 






3° 



2 


2 





1 


1 





2 


2 





I 





1 


2 


1 


1 


4 


1 


3 


6 


4 


2 


1 


1 






Between 10 and 20 years, 
Between 20 and 30 years, 
Between 30 and 40 years, 
Between 40 and 50 years, 
Between 50 and 60 years, 
Between 60 and 70 years, 
Between 70 and 80 years, 
Between 80 and 90 years, 

27 18 9 

Age of the oldest person deceased (male) 81 years. 

CAUSES OF DEATH.- 

Classified according to the nomenclature adopted by the 
State Board of Registration. 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 
Diphtheria, 1 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 

Cancer of Intestines, 1 

Disease Heart, 5 

Bronchitis-Chronic, 1 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Brights Disease, 1 

Pneumonia, 2 

Entero-Colitic, 1 

Indigestion, Acute, 1 



3i 



DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 



Shock, 
Apoplexy, 
Abscess of Brain, 
Pernicious Anaemia, 
Cerebral Softening, 
Infantile Debility, 
Premature Birth, 
General Debility, 
Stillborn, 



VIOLENT DEATHS, 



Fall— Accidental, 
Killed by Cars, 
Suicide by Hanging, 

Total, 



1 
1 

1 

27 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED. 



John Natorwitcz, 
Martha Ann Dickinson, 
Wm D. Billings, 
Emma A. Howard, 
Maurice Fitzgibbons, 
Elisha Hubbard, 
Luther Wells, 
Katherine Orman, 
Edward R. Kiley, 
Charles James Abbott, 
Bridget Kelly, 
Apolinata Natorwitcz, 

Patrick 



Edward J. Manchester, 
Katherine Wade, 
Marie C. Carpenter, 
Almeron Crafts, 
Marshall H Burke, 
Nelson Desmarais, 
Joseph Cosuscoski, 
Fidelia M. Pease, 
Victoria Pionka, 
Mary A. Nolan, 
Wendle Randall, 
Geo. Washington Reed, 
Sheehan. 



DOG LICENSES. 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending Nov- 
ember 30th, 1906, with the receipts and settlements of the ac- 
count with the County Treasurer, is as follows: 

96 male dogs at $2 each, 
5 female dogs at $5 each, 

Less fees, 101 dogs at 20 cents each, 

Amount paid County Treasurer June 1st 

and December 1st, 1906, $196 80 

Amount received for dog licenses for the five previous years. 
1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 



£192 00 




25 00 






$217 00 






20 20 



*221 1211 1204 -1208 $196 20 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Town Cleric 



33 



Assessors' Report. 



Value of assessed personal estate, $ 415,325 00 
real estate, 1,038,663 00 

Total value of assessed estate, $1,453,988 00 

Value of assessed buildings, $569,645 00 

Value of assessed land, 469 018 00 

51,038,663 00 

No. of male polls assessed, 595 

" residents assessed on property, 332 

All others, (Corporations, etc.,) 31 

363 



No of non-residents assessed on property, 47 

All others, 26 

• 73 

No. of persons assessed on property, 436 

For poll tax only, 316 

752 

Rate of total tax per $1000, $13 30 

No. of horses assessed, (2 mules) 464 

" cows assessed, 323 

" neat cattle, 65 

" swine, 17 

" fowls, 1,752 

" dwelling houses, 325 

" acres of land, 9,244 

State tax, $1,519 40 

County tax, 1,832 88 

Town grant, 18,375 00 

Overlayings, 123 25 

— $21,850 53 



Estimated bank and corporation tax, 



1,400 00 



$20,450 53 



Conn. Valley St. R. Co. Excise Tax, £280 63 

Value of property exempt from taxation, chap. 12, sec. 5, Rev- 
ised Laws. 



Literary Institutions, 
Church property, 



68,525 00 
27,000 00 



$95,525 00 



Rsspectfully submitted, 

JOHN VOLLINGER, ) Assessors 

JAMES L. DAY, [ of 

L. H. KINGSLEY, • ) Hatfield. 



35 



Report of Sinking Fund 
Commissioners. 



We have the following amounts deposited to the credit of 
the Sinking Fund. 

Ambers Savings Bank, $1,474 66 

Northampton Institution for Savings 1,151 37 

Haydenville Savings Bank, 1,222 04 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, 273 29 

Florence Savings Bank, 1,126 86 

Greenfield Savings Bank, 1,038 24 

The Franklin Savings Institution, 1,026 39 

Kasthampton Savings Bank, 240 85 

Town of Hatfield, Water Bond, 1,000 00 

Boston & Maine Railroad Bonds, 2,000 00 



#10,553 70 



M. J. RYAN, ) Sinking 

R. M. WOODS, [ Fund 

K. S. WARNER, ) Commissioners. 



I have this day examined the securities of the Sinking 
Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor. 

Hatfield, March 5, 1907. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, 1907 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

HENRY S. HUBBARD, Chairman, 1909. 

LAWRENCE A. POWERS, Secretary, 1907 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 1908. 
M. H. BOWMAN, Supt. 



Truant Officers* 

Joseph S. Wells, John M. Strong, A. L. Strong and S. 
W. Kingsley. 

Authorized to Sign Certificates for children between the 
ages of 14 and 16. 

M. H. BOWMAN. 



School Census, Sept, I, 1906. 

Number of boys between the ages of 5 and 15, 140 

Number of girls between the ages of 5 and 15, 123 



Total, 263 

Number of boys between the ages of 7 and 14, 97 

Number of girls between the ages of 7 and 14. 89 

Total, 186 

38 



REPORT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Balance in Treasurer's hands from 1906, 


$ 172 10 


Town appropriation, 


4,200 00 


" Tuition Smith Academy, 


500 00 


Dog Fund, 


145 70 


State School Fund, 


706 50 


State, for Superintendent, 


400 00 


City of Northampton, 


217 00 


City of Boston, 


18 00 


Evening School, 


50 00 


Appropriation for new school room, 


1,500 00 


" fixtures and teacher for new room, 


500 00 


Received for Supplies, 


1 70 


" Lumber, 


12 37 




vt>,423 57 



Total amount of Orders drawn on Treasurer, $7,704 38 

Balance of School Fund in Treasury Mar. 1, 1907, 719 19 

^8,4lib v i 

ORDERS DRAWN ON TOWN TREASURER. 

M. H. Bowman, Treasurer, $480 00 

R. M. Woods, Treas., Tuition Smith Academy, 500 00 

Mary E. Breor, 360 00 

Katherine W. Day, 360 00 

Mrs. Arabel F. Forbes, 360 00 



Carrie H. Warner, 290 00 

Margaret A. Ryan, 360 00 

Jessie D. Penniman, 120 00 

Lillian I. Proulx, 72 00 

Agnes Moyhihan, 36 00 

Bessie M. Felton, 108 00 

Mabel R. Farrar, 216 00 

Sarah V. Kiley, 216 00 

Grace W. Bardwell, 240 00 

Mary J. Mulcahy, 240 00 

Lillian B. Hutchings, Drawing Teacher, 41 67 

Urania G. Barrows, Music Teacher, 180 00 

Ruth C. Jackson, Drawing Teacher, 83 33 

Conn. Valley St. Ry. Co., School Tickets. 43 00 

Teachers for attending Teachers' Meetings, 27 00 

Howard & Smith, Coal, 262 74 

J. H. Danforth, Coal, 94 03 

Wm. K Boyle, Drawing Coal, 10 00 

John J. Betsold, " 11 25 
A. L- Strong, Wood, - 12 00 

James Bardwell, " 27 00 

H.-S, Hubbard, " 5 00 

Salvas & Braman, Sawing Wood, 4 30 

Sweeping School Houses, 64 12 

Ralph Howard, Janitor, 7 50 

C. H. Hubbard, " 30 90 

Mrs. Hilbert, " 19 50 

John Salvas, " 49 35 

James Orman, " 27 00 

Charles Flynn, •' 24 00 

Silas G. Hubbard, " 18 00 

Elizabeth Roaf. Teaching, 40 00 

Mrs. M. Hilbert, Janitor and Sweeping, 37 50 

James Bardwell, Wood, 12 50 

James Orman, Janitor, 15 00 

Evening School, A. J. Chidester, 25 00 

Janitor, 1905, 7 40 

Janitor and Oil, 13 61 

40 



J. L- Hammitt & Co. Supplies, 

Ginn & Company, 

Silver, Burdett & Co., 

American Book Co., 

The Davis Press, 

Edward E. Babb & Co., 

Rand, McNally & Co., 

Milton Bradley & Co., 

H. S. Hubbard, Freight and Express, 

Houghton Mufflin & Co., Supplies, 

S. S. Dwight, Expressage, 

Stenie A. Weaver, Supplies, 

Benj, H. Sanborn, '.' 

D. C. Heath & Co , 

Expressage, Freight and Cartage, 

Foster Bros, Dusters, 

H. S. Hubbard, School Committee, 

M. H. Bowman, Telephone, Postage etc., 

Ralph Howard, Key, 

R. F. Putnam, Plans for alterations, 

James Orman, Labor* school yard, 

David Landry, Labor, 

Claude Hubbard, Labor, 

J. S. Wells, Truant Officer, 

J. H. Danforth, Mdse., 

H. S. Hubbard, Mowing School Yard, 

Cash for Glass and Door Spring, 

' " labor, 

11 Freight, Exp. and Cartage, 1117 

" Clocks. 4 50 

Mrs. Wm. Shea, Cleaning School Rooms, 22 00 

Mrs. George Fuseck, " 

Mrs. Margaret Hilbert, " 

C. W. Wolfram, Care of School Yard, 

Peter Nozock, Labor, 

John Jembroski, " 

Wm. Lyons, " 

John J. Betsold, School Committee, 

H. S. Hubbard, School Census, 

4i 



93 


99 


80 


87 


45 


58 


60 


74 


2 


00 


12 


50 


11 


48 


12 


00 


3 


14 


20 


91 


1 


35 


1 


35 


5 


00 


3 


75 


5 


40 


2 


50 


40 


00 


16 


28 




30 


40 


00 


10 


50 


4 


50 


2 


00 


4 


75 




75 


4 


00 


5 


15 


11 


25 



6 


00 


7 


50 


6 


50 


4 50 


3 


75 


6 


00 


15 


00 


18 


00 



H. S. Hubbard, New School Room, 15 00 

F. J. Saffer, Book Case, 7 91 

John Salvas, Care of School Yard, 10 00 

SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS. 

James M. Pierce, Glass, 

E. M. Graves, Labor, 

John J. Betsold, labor, 

J. A. Sullivan, Supplies, 

Otis Hager, Lumber, 

John Evans, Repairing Slate Roof, 

Louis Gould, Labor, 

Foster Bros., Mdse., 

Merrick Lumber Co., Lumber, 

H. S. Hubbard, Labor, 

James Ormau, 

C. W. Wolfram, 

Edgar P. Lyman, 

W. H. Riley & Co., 

David Lynch, 

Chas. N. Fitts, Desk, W. Hatfield, 

E. M. Graves, Labor, 
L. A. Powers, School Committee, 

State Report, 

Labor, 
John Monahan ' ' 
John Salvas, Labor and Broom, 
M. J. Ryan, Mdse., 
J. H. Howard, Mdse., 
James Bard well, Labor and Lumber, 

NEW SCHOOL ROOM 

James Orman, Labor, 

Howard & Smith, Cement and Labor, 

W. H. Bailey, Brick and Laying, 

Merrick Lumber Co., Lumber, 

A. L- Strong, Labor and Material, 

F. J. Saffer, labor, 

42 



3 


00 


7 


65 


67 


15 


5 


00 


8 


77 


10 


90 


3 


80 


6 


67 


11 


56 


1 


20 


1 


20 


3 


25 


20 


27 


25 


01 


13 


70 


10 


00 


5 


65 


15 


00 


5 


00 


25 


00 


17 


50 


2 


10 


7 


86 


16 


08 


6 


00 


7 


50 


35 


50 


52 


15 


440 


92 


110 


79 


162 


15 



8 


00 


4 


00 


14 


00 


82 


73 


26 


08 


207 


12 


324 


28 


37 


35 


94 


90 


7 


02 


£7,704 


88 


719 


19 



Charles Wade, Drawing Stone, 

WhalenBros.; 

H. S. Hubbard, Drawing Slate, Desks and Labor, 

John Evans, Slating, 

J. A. Sullivan, Supplies. 

Chas. N. Fitts, Desks, Chairs, Shades and Table, 

W. H. Riley & Co., Furnace, Ceiling, Blackboards, 

Edgar P. Lyman, Labor, 

Estate of M. H. Burke, Painting, 

J. H. Howard, 

Total Amount of Orders Drawn on Treas., 
Balance of School Fund in Treasury, 

$8,423 57 

There are quite a number of bills that have not been sent 
in, so that our balance as given will be reduced one hundred 
and fifty or two hundred dollars when these bills are paid. 

The new school room that we built last summer, with the 
furnishings cost something over 11,600, and we think it the 
best school rcom we have. 

New problems are continually coming up for the School 
Committee to solve. Just now the West Brook School is before 
us, with an overcrowded room. There will be seven or eight 
grades this coming year, and we feel that something must be 
done to do justice to that part of the town. We shall either 
have to transport some of the upper grades, or employ another 
teacher and fit up another room. We have room enough to 
accommodate all of our scholars if they lived nearer some school 
that was not crowded West Hatfield and Bradstreet schools 
are small, but too far away for scholars to attend unless they 
are transported. 

For the School Committee, 

HENRY S. HUBBARD, 

Chairman. 



43 



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46 



Superintendent's Report. 



To the School Committee of Hatfield : 

I hereby present to you, and through you to the citizens 
of the town, my second annual report of the public schools of 
the town. I have included the reports of the Supervisor of 
Drawing. The statistics are for the calendar year 1906. 

I feel justified in stating that during the past year desir- 
able progress has been made in school work. The spirit and 
industry of pupils is commendable. The fidelity of the 
teachers and the painstaking character of their instruction is 
gratifying. But the results of education cannot be computed. 
To what extent the character of the child has been uplifted, 
and to how great a degree his life has been moulded, cannot 
be measured. And since character building is of supreme 
importance it is of more consequence who teaches the child 
than what he is taught. It is not so important what the child 
is going to do with his knowledge of arithmetic, grammar or 
Ivatin, or any other study, as what these studies will do with 
him. The number of facts memorized or of pages studied 
may be a matter of record. But the impression made upon 
the child is beyond computation. In connection with this 
thought it may be added that the tenure of office of the teacher 
ought to be more secure ; and such a wage should be paid and 
certainty of position guaranteed that she will feel that she is a 
part of the community. No teacher can plan and labor for 
the best and highest when compelled to live in expectation of 
possible dismissal at any time. This is all the more important 
as the teacher reaches middle age and yet is at the zenith of 
her usefulness, 



Attention is called to the advisability of a strict interpre- 
tation of the law relating to school attendance. This is all 
the more necessary, as we consider the welfare of the future 
citizen and the state. There is an increased feeling on the 
part of the State that every child must receive his full heritage 
of mental development. This is manifested by a stricter 
application of labor laws ; that it is no longer permissible to 
grant absences from school ; that a child under sixteen years 
of age that cannot read and write the English language as 
well as an average third grade pupil cannot be employed in any 
factory, store or workshop, while public schools are in session. 
That more knowledge and skill is being constantly required in 
all departments of work emphasizes the statement that save 
for illness every pupil must attend school regularly. While 
we sympathize with the parent that is in great need of help on 
the farm or in the shop, yet we feel more deeply for the child 
who in a few years is to go out into the world with a very 
limited education. The trend of the Americn nation has not 
only been onward, but upward, and to such a degree that in 
many respects it is the leader of the world. When the Mosely 
Committee from England were making their examinations of 
American institutions nothing impressed them so much as its 
schools and the high degree of intelligence manifested by the 
citizens. This they attributed to compulsory school attend- 
ance. 

With the commencement of the fall term the new grammar 
school was opened at the Centre with the eighth and ninth 
grades in attendance. About twenty-four pupils were en-, 
rolled. Several, who were in advance of their grade and had 
been studying during the vacation, were admitted to the 
Academy, where they continue to do acceptable work. 
Others, after some weeks of test, were promoted from the 
eighth to^ the ninth grade. With the opening of this the 
pressure was removed from the Hill grammar school. That 
the school will meet a decided need will become more mani- 
fest as the years pass. That more thorough work will be done 
with the ninth grade than formerly has been done at the 
Academy is true. Every observer will admit that the high 

48 



school has enough work of its own to perform, and to combine 
grade and high school studies is to do inferior work in both. 
Again, the grammar school should be held responsible for the 
proper and thorough preparation of pupils for high school 
work. However, this school will only do its best work when 
parents are interested enough to have their children attend 
regularly and do some studying at home evenings. 

In accordance with Chapter 502, Acts 1906, each town of 
this State is required to appoint one or more school physicians, 
who from time to time shall visit the schools and ascertain the 
condition of health of each pupil. The teachers are required, 
under the direction of the Superintendent, to test the sight 
and hearing of each pupil. Whenever a child is found that 
is deficient in either sight or hearing, the parent of that child 
is to be notified. In conformity with the "above mentioned 
act the State has furnished the necessary material, the teach- 
ers have made the required examinations, and parents have 
been notified. Those so notified ought to promptly take the 
necessary measures ro relieve the child. 

While this law becomes mandatory for the first time 
throughout the State, yet in some cities it has been in prac- 
tical operation for several years, and with increasing bene- 
ficial results. If put into effect in a common-sense manner 
itj2annot fail of bringing relief to those that suffer and also 
safeguard those in normal health. While the law is quite 
flexible at present, yet as its beneficial results appear it will 
be more expanded until preventative measures prevail every- 
where. 

That the modern school differs in many ways from the 
school of half a century ago is very apparent. That it makes 
greater demands upon the pupil, both in respect to time and 
scholarship, is true. That more subjects are yearly demand- 
ing a place upon the school curriculum is a fact. That some 
of the old-time subjects, as geography and history, are being 
greatly expanded is a verity. In the rapid expansion of 
knowledge along all lines, especially industrial, there is little 
hope of any contraction of the school courses or of the de- 
mands made by the higher institutions of learning. Again, 

49 



there is reason for thinking that even greater claims will be 
made upon the pupil who aims to keep pace with his fellows 
in the race for success. Furthermore, parents are demanding 
thrt their children shall have completed a good course of 
study severil years before they are out of their teens. To 
meet, even to a resonable degree, these demands calls for the 
special co-operation of the parent with the teacher in two 
lines: First, that the pupil be at school every day when health 
will permit; second, that in the higher grades time shall be 
given for home study. The latter is as essential as the former. 
Unless the pupil comes to class with lessons properly prepared 
progress is nearly impossible. Again, it is not reasonable to 
expect that the willing worker shall be kept behind became 
some other pupil does not properly prepare work, either in or 
out of school. Only one course of action is permissible, 
namely, that those members of a class that are qualified shall 
advauce and others remain behind. 



SUGGESTIONS. 

In 1906 an appropriation of $350 was made for purchas- 
ing supplies for the public schools of this town. As the total 
enrollment of the schools of the town has been 250 the allow- 
ance per pupil for supplies has been $1.40. Out of the sum 
appropriated not only the regular supplies must be purchased, 
but also all extras for the departments of music and drawing. 
With an increasing demand for books and an increase in 
prices, it is impossible to properly meet the demands of the 
schools with the above appropriation. Again, the pupils that 
attend the Academy have been furnishing their own supplies. 
But these* children are as much our own as they w 7 ere when in 
the grades. If deserving of help then, more deserving now. 
Furthermore, with some parent it may be the one thing that 
decides whether the child shall be given advantages beyond 
the grades or not. To reasonably furnish the children of all 
the schools with necessary supplies calls for an appropriation 
of $500. 



5o 



Finally, respectful attention is invited to the fact that the 
town should make some arrangement with the trustees of 
Smith Academy whereby the children of the town that attend 
that institution may secure all that would accrue to them in a 
high school that met State requirements. It is believed that 
there is no serious obstacle in the way of forming such a 
union with the Academy that would be acceptable to the State 
and also secure the State aid of $500 annually. If such an 
arrangement could be made, the Academy, that has a long and 
very commendable record of service to its credit, would enter 
upon a new era of prosperity, greatly benefiting the pupils 
and not increasing the tax of the town. With the single 
thought in mind of aiding the children of the town the above 
suggestions are offered. 

In closing I thank you, members of the School Commit- 
tee and all others that have aided in rendering the schools 
effective, for the kindness accorded me. 

Respectfully yours, 

MORTIMER H. BOWMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 

Hatfield, Feb. 8. 1907. 



5* 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 
Common Schools. 

Spring Term (12 weeks) April 1— June 21. 
Fall Term (15 weeks) Sept. 4— Dec. 20. 
Winter Term (9 weeks) Jan. 6 — March 14. 

RESIGNATIONS AND TRANSFERS. 

Arabel F. Forbes, transferred from West Grammar to Centre 
Grammar. 

West Primary — Lillian I. Proulx, resigned. 
West Brook — Jessie D. Penniman, resigned. 
Bradstreet — Bessie M. Felton, resigned. 



52 



Report of Supervisor of Drawing, 



Mr. M. H. Bow?nan, Superintendent of Schools : 

The aim of the drawing is to cultivate an appreciation of 
what is beautiful in nature and the arts, to develop power, 
skill and individuality in expressson, to encourage the inven- 
tive power, and to train the eye of the pupil to accurately 
judge the size, shape and dimensions of objects, so that the 
drawing may have a practical use in future years. 

In order to meet the requirements necessitated by the 
aim, the work in the upper grades has been divided into the 
follpwing classes: Nature, color, mechanical, constructive 
work, object drawing and design. In the lower grade into 
these classes: Nature, constructive, pictorial work, and the 
developmental study of a few common objects. 

With the exception of the color work in the upper grades, 
the drawing has shown a steady improvement, not only in the 
results, but in the manner of drawing and the enthusiasm dis- 
played. In the spring we shall take up color again, and hope 
to do good work. 

I wish to thank the teachers for their earnest and faithful 
work. Their hearty co-operation has aided me greatly and 
made the teaching a pleasure. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTH C. JACKSON, 

Supervisor of Drawing. 



Vocal Music 



Mr. M. H. Bowman, Superintendent of Schools ; 

I submit the following brief report regarding the depart- 
ment of vocal music in the schools of Hatfield : 

Thanks to the faithful co-operation of the teachers the 
year has marked greater progress than either of 'the two pre- 
ceding. 

Throughout the schools, as a whole, there has been an 
improvement in the quality of tone. When we succeed in 
getting the pupils to give a sweet musical tone in the daily 
leseon, they soon learn to distinguish between the beauty of 
pure sweet tones and any discordant. 

Public school music should result in accurate and ready 
sight readers. While the gain here is gratifying, it shohld 
be a stimulus to teachers and pupils alike, iuciting to more 
earnest effort, as the future possibilities are so unlimited. 

The graduate from the grammar room should carry with 
him a thorough knowledge of the fundamental principles of 
music. At the close of this school year nearly all the classes 
in the primary grade rooms will have covered the ground 
required in these technics in their several grades. While 
there is advancement in the intermediate and grammar grades, 
time will be necessary to bring them up to grade. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank teachers for cordial sup» 
port. They alone can make this work porfitable to each in- 
divdual. The progress noted evidences their earnest efforts. 

Respectfully, 

URANIA G. BURROWS. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 




FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, 1908, 



HERALD JOB PRINT 

NORTHAMPTON," MASS. : 

T908 



Articles in the Warrant for Town Meeting, 
March 16, 1908. 



Article 1. — To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Article 2. — To choose all necessary Town Officers for the 
ensuing year: Town Clerk, three Selectmen, three Assessors 
(one for three years, one for two years, and one for one 
year) , Town Treasurer, one School Committee for three years, 
one Water Commissioner for three years, one Sinking Fund 
Commissioner for three years, one Trustee for Public Library 
for three years, Auditor, Tree Warden, Elector under the 
will of Oliver Smith, Tax Collector, six Constables, and to 
vote on the question, "Yes" or "No" — Shall licenses be 
granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town! 

Article 3. — To revise and accept the list of Jurors 
reported by the Selectmen. 

Article 4. — To hear the reports of the various Town 
Officers and act thereon. 

Article 5. — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 6. — To take action in relation to maintenance and 
repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing year. 

Article 7. — To take action in relation to raising money 
to defray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 8. — To see what action the town will take in rela- 
tion to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Article 9. — To see if the town will make an appropriation 
for Memorial Day. 



4 

Article 10. — To take action in relation to the support of 
the poor for the ensuing year. 

Article 11. — To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for the care of cemeteries for the ensuing year. 

Article 12. — To see if the town will vote to remove the 
hedge around the Main street cemetery, and appropriate 
money for so doing. 

Article 13. — To see if the town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Sections 1 to 41, inclusive, of Chapter 49, R. L., 
in regard to sewers and drains. 

Article 14. — To see if the town will employ a teacher of 
music in the public schools for the ensuing year, and make an 
appropriation for the same. 

Article 15. — To see if the town will appropriate money 
for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children in Smith 
Academy, who are of suitable age and attainments to attend 
High School. 

Article IB. — To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for repairs on schoolhouses. 

Article 17. — To see if the town will employ a teacher of 
drawing in the public schools the ensuing year, and make an 
appropriation for the same. 

Article 18. — To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 

Article 19. — To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 20. — To see if the town will authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow 
during the municipal year beginning March 1, 1908, in antici- 
pation of the collection of taxes of said year, such sums of 
money as may be necessary for the current expenses of the 
town, but not exceeding the total tax levy for said year, giving 
the notes of the town therefor, payable within one year from 
the dates thereof. All debts incurred under authority of this 



vote shall be paid from the taxes of the present municipal 
year. 

Article 21. — To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for lighting public streets the ensuing year. 

Article 22. — To see if the town will vote to build any side- 
walks on any part of any street, and make an n impropriation 
for the same, the abutters to pay one-half the cost. 

Article 23. — To see if the town will vote to build any per- 
manent roads of stone or other material, in any section of the 
town, and raise or appropriate money for the same. 

Article 24.— To see if the town will make an appropria- 
tion for the employment of a School Physician, in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906. 

Article 25. — To see if the town will vote to buy a snow- 
plough, and appropriate money for same. 

Article 26. — To see if the town will vote to extend the 
South Main street sewer system, and raise or appropriate 
money for the same. 

Article 27. — To see if the town will vote to extend the 
water system through Depot Road to the residences of John S. 
Denlein and one Jandenski, and raise or make an appropria- 
tion for the same. 

Article 28. — To see if the town will vote an appropria- 
tion for purchasing any supplies or apparatus needed by the 
Fire Department. 

Article 29. — To see if the town will vote to open up a 
drain or small brook on east side of highway, nearly opposite 
residence of Gilbert E. Morton, in Bradstreet. 

Article 30. — To see if the town will authorize the Select- 
men to contract with the Massachusetts Highway Commission, 
according to the provisions of Section 10, Chapter 47, R. L., 
to construct a section of State Highway to be built in Hat- 
field this year. 



Article 31. — To see if the town will authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow a 
sum of money, not exceeding $5,000, to construct said high- 
way ; said loan to be paid out of the money paid the town by 
the State Highway Commission for construcing said road. 



Selectmen's Report, 



To the Citizens of Hatfield, Mass. : 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the requirements of the 
Public Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for the 
year ending March 2, 1908, is respectfully submitted : 

STATE AID EXPENDITURES. 

Richard B. Abbott, $60.00 

Charles R. Crafts, 24.00 

Mrs. Sarah W. Bardwell, 28.00 



$112.00 



POOR EXPENDITURES. 

M. J. Proulx, expense to Tewksbury with State boys, $ 13.94 

Mrs. F. T. Vining, board Mary J. Manchester, 144.00 
Dr. A. J. Bonneville, medical attendance Mary J. 

Manchester, 7.00 
C. N. Clark, house rent Gendron family, 17.00 
City of Northampton, medical attendance and sup- 
plies A. J. Gendron family, 50.30 
John Bluder, sawing wood Margaret O'Neal, 1.75 
M. J. Ryan, supplies for Margaret O'Neal, 55.46 
Howard & Smith, coal Margaret O'Neal, 7.88 
City of Northampton, supplies Christianna Wentgel, 31.31 
City of Northampton, supplies Joseph Proulx, 9.10 
Thaddeus Graves, house rent Shea family, 42.00 
M. J. Ryan, supplies Shea family, 58.93 
Dr. C. A. Byrne, medical attendance Shea family, 38.50 



8 

Howard & Smith, coal Shea family, 24.14 

Howard & Smith, coal Patrick Brennan, 6.81 

Dr. C. A. Byrne, medical attendance H. P. Tisdale, 5.00 



$513.12 
Appropriation, $600.00 

Balance, $86.88 

OUTSIDE POOR EXPENDITURE. 

B. & M. R, R., house rent for Mrs, Nelso Deiiroy, $39.00 

Dr. C. A. Byrne, medical attendance Mrs. N. Denroy, 1.00 

Dr. C. A. Byrne, medical attendance Peter Gengrass, 11.00 

Dr. C. A. Byrne, medical attendance Andrew Pudlesne, 12.00 



$63.00 



MEMORIAL BUILDING. 

Hatfield Gas Co., lighting, $27.17 

A. L. Strong, wood, 12.00 

Howard & Smith, coal, 51.00 

Reupert D. Graves, repairs, 21.25 

E. P. Lyman, repairs, 2.50 

L. H. Kingsley, janitor, 75.00 



$188.92 



WATER RATES. 

Hatfield Water Works, $500.00 

Temporary loan, 600.00 

BONDS FOR TOWN OFFICERS. 

Wm. M. Cochran, treasurer, $24.00 

Wm. M. Cochran, collector, 15.00 

•■-• $39.00 



9 

CEMETERY APPROPRIATION. 

F. H. Bardwell, treasurer, $100.00 

MEMORIAL DAY APPROPRIATION. 

C. K. Morton, treasurer, $50.00 

STREET LIGHTING APPROPRIATION. 



Hatfield Gas Co., 


$787.46 


TREE WARDEN. 




P. J. Whalen, cash paid for labor, 


$60.25 


P. W. Schepp, labor, trimming and bolting trees, 


38.00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY EXPENDITURES. 



$98.25 



Magazine Club, magazines, $ 5.00 

J. W. Heffernan, books and supplies, 28.85 

P. H. Chew, binding magazines and supplies, 11.25 

S. E. Bridgman, books, 100.95 

L. H. Kingsley, printing cards, . 8.82 

C. M. Barton, services as librarian, 75.00 

C. M. Barton, cataloging and recataloging, 62.90 

C. M, Barton, cash paid for supplies, 3.83 



$296.60 



MUSTER DAY APPROPRIATION. 
M. J. Ryan, treasurer, $75.00 

SINKING FUND APPROPRIATION. 
M. J. Ryan, treasurer, $861.67 



FIRE DEPARTMENT EXPENDITURES. 

Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co., new hose, $199.17 

Fred Wentzel, storing hose wagon No. 1, 5.00 

Thomas H. O'Dea, storing hose wagon No. 2, 5.00 

John J. Betsold, storing hose wagon No. 3, 5.00 

John J. Betsold, services of Co. No. 3, 3.00 

C. H. Crafts, storing hose wagon No. 5, 5.00 

C. PI. Crafts, services of Co. No. 5, - 4.00 

C. W. Marsh, storing hose wagon No. 4, 5.00 

C. W. Marsh, drying hose, old bill, 2.00 

Fred A. Allaire, services of Co. No. 1, 2.00 

Fred A. Allaire, services of Co. No. 1, old bill, 4.00 



$239.17 



TOWN OFFICERS. 

M. J. Ryan, services as chairman selectmen, 1906, $ 150.00 

C. L. Graves, services as selectman, 1906, 75.00 

C. H. Crafts, services as selectman, 1906, 75.00 

D. W. Wells, services as water commissioner, 1906, 10.00 

C. L. Warner, services as water commissioner, 1906, 10.00 
M. J. Proulx, services as water commissioner 1906, 10.00 
II. S. Hubbard, chairman school committee, 1906, 50.00 
Howard C. Belden, one-half payment collector, 1906, 100.00 
James L. Day, assessor, 1907, 38.75 
L. H. Kingsley, assessor, 1907, 93.75 
John Vollinger, assessor, 1907, 82.50 
F. H. Bardwell, ballot clerk, 4.00 

D. P. McGrath, ballot clerk, 2.00 
A. H. Breor, ballot clerk, 4.00 
Lewis J. Pellissier, ballot clerk, 2.00 
Rudolph W^eber, ballot clerk, 2.00 
Reuben F. Wells, ballot clerk, 2.00 
'Wm. H. Belden, registrar of voters, 8.00 

T. W. Ryan, registrar of voters, 8,00 



n 

S. F. Billings, registrar of voters, 8.00 

C. K. Morton, elector, 1907, 10.00 

B. M. Warner, moderator, 1907, 5.00 

E. B: Dickinson, auditor, 1906, 5.00 

Howard C. Belden, balance due as collector, 100.00 

John J. Betsold, services school committee, 1907, 15.00 

Lawrence Powers, services school committee, 1907, 20.00 

L. H. Kingsley, services town clerk, 300.00 

L. H. Kingsley, services treasurer, 100.00 



STATE ROAD EXPENDITURES. 



SOUTH MAIN STREET SEWER, 



$1,290.00 



T. J. Ryan, superintendent, $38.00 

Joseph Newman, labor, 27.50 

Steven Vachula, labor, 48.25 

J. S. Bardwell, labor, 28.00 

H. O. Shumway, labor, 21.00 

David Billings, 32.00 

Daniel Sheehan, 36.00 

Howard & Smith, 20.00 

John Uric, 15.75 

Paul Holich, 15.75 

Patrick Brennan, 12.25 

Lawrence Waltz, 13.13 

Jacob Geiss, 3.50 

Charles Wagner, 3.50 

A. L. Strong, 8.00 

John Vollinger, 34.50 



$357.13 



James P. Rigan, iron pipe, $ 26.20 

M. J. Ryan, 6 cars sewer pipe, 572.97 

B. & M. R. R. freight on sewer pipe, 323.89 



\2 

Norwood Engineering Co., catch basins, 48.00 

Howard & Smith, cement, 26.40 

Shumway & Riley, oakum rope, 8.64 

W: A. Bailey, brick, 25.50 

David Billings, labor and brick, 4.50 

Win. H. Riley, pipe, 68.96 

City of Northampton, rent of cleaning machine, 10.00 

E. C. & E. E. Davis, surveying, 63.40 
M. J. Ryan, supplies, 7.35 
M. J. Ryan, services attending hearing of Sewer Com- 
missioners, Boston, 10.00 

T. J. Ryan, superintendent, 117.50 

M. J. Proulx, labor, 77.24 

Lawrence Waltz, labor, 67.57 

Jacob Geiss, labor, 44.08 

Prank Dugal, labor, 36.94 

Paul Michey, labor, 8.94 

Michael Sharek, labor, 33.44 

Buerejli Buerzak, labor, 31.81 

John Lymula, labor, 20.45 

Eddie Kempisty, labor, 63.00 

Sobek Yancras, labor, 16.82 

J. S. Bardwell, labor, 4.00 

Patrick Brennan, labor, ■ 45.50 

Win. Murphy, labor, 7.88 

Paul Holich, labor, 1.75 

Leroy Graves, labor, 2.13 

Stanly Prodenroski, labor, 5.25 

George Steel, labor, 5.25 

Jariot Chimence, labor, 2.82 

Paul Wirgelewski, labor, 17.50 

F. H. Bardwell, labor, 31.50 
John Mutuseo, labor, 14.00 
Thomas McGrath, labor, 17.50 
Hamilton Kelvy, labor, 1.75 
Joseph Chimuro, labor, 7.88 



J3 



Frank Godlenski, labor, 
Myron Solaski, labor, 
John Sargaski, labor, 
Lawrence Parks, labor, 
John Psyewozonik, labor, 
George Syenjera, labor, 
Michael Sereda, labor, 
Paul Nachy, labor, 
Frank Ginza, labor, 
Sebastian Ginza, labor, 
Michael Paul, labor, 
Joseph Lijda, labor. 
Uroko Yanzek, labor, 
Martin Cisck, labor, 
Andrew Bukoski, labor, 
Sylvester Gonchos, labor, 
Jurko Laszkeiwaz, labor, 
John Koyleh, labor, 
George Eberlein, repairs, 



Appropriation, 

Value of Akron tile unused, 



3.50 
14.00 
15.75 

8.55 
4.64 
3.00 
6.00 
6.75 
17.77 
9.60 
2.50 
1.64 
2.55 
5.39 
9.39 
6.75 
8.25 
5.25 
1.00 



$2,000.59 

$2,000.00 

$61.25 



CONTINGENCIES. 



Herald Job Print, printing 500 town reports, $ 70.00 

Herald Job Print, printing 50 school reports, 16.80 

Herald Job Print, printing 500 ballots, 18.25 

Herald Job Print, printing scarlet fever placards, 3.50 

Herald Job Print, printing 2 order books, 5.50 

Gazette Printing Co., printing tax bills, 3.50 

J. S. Wells, services truant officer, 1906, 1.00 
Dr. A. J. Bonneville, fumigating, medical inspection, 80.75 

Dr. C. A. Byrne, fumigating, medical inspection, 112.00 

Dr. C. A. Byrne, returning births, 8.50 



u 

E. S. Warner, inspecting animals, 61.00 
E. S. Warner, inspecting beeves, veals and hogs, 50.25 
E. S. Warner, quarantining, 2.00 
C. N. Fitts, supplies, Sadewski, hospital, 11.90 
Mrs. S. P. Tilton, nurse, Sadewski, hospital, 45.00 
M. J. Ryan, supplies, Sadewski, hospital, 7.65 
Dr. C. A. Byrne, med. attendance, Sadewski, hospital, 16.00 
Miss Laura Wilder, provisions, Sadewski, hospital, 16.42 
Howard & Smith, team work, .50 
Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, tool house, old bill, 13.91 
Win. P. Boyle, painting tool house, old bill, 25.53 
C. H. Pierce, insurance premium, 90.00 
Fred Wentzel, services as constable, 7.00 
Chas. D. Harris, services as constable, 10.00 
M. J. Proulx, services as constable, 4th July, 2.00 
J. T. Powers, services as constable, 4th July, 2.00 
Arthur Bardwell, services as special constable, 4th July, 2.00 
S. W. Kingsley, services as constable, 11.50 
Willis Holden, services as special constable, 2.00 
Herbert D. Smith, services aiding constable, 3.00 
Hatfield Gas Co., lighting town hall, 5.77 
Rupert D. Graves, repairs town hall, 21.07 
A. C. Bardwell, janitor town hall, 12.00 
A. C. Bardwell, care town clock, 9.00 
Estate CD. Bardwell, care town clock, 4.15 
Estate C. D. Bardwell, janitor town hall, 6.50 
Kavanagh Brothers Co., memorial in Pilgrim monu- 
ment, 45.00 
Louis J. Pellissier, services as fish and game warden, 

1906 and 1907, 10.00 
C. H. Pierce, insurance premium, West Brook school- 
house, 52.50 
Silas Porter, fee for dike damage, 5.00 
E. M. Graves, moving booths and puttying glass, 1.75 
E. M. Graves, plumbing and material, tool house, 9.77 
Larkin Proulx, ferryman during high water, 3.00 
Seth W, Kingsley, truant officer, 7 ? 00 



J5 

Setli W. Kingsley, tool repairs, 3.90 

H. E. Bel den, letterheads, postage, etc., 9.50 

M. J. Ryan, postage on town reports, 3.35 

B. & M. R. R., freight on hose, .83 

L. H. Kingsley, copying valuations, 22.00 

L. H. Kingsley, recording births, marriages, deaths, 50.70 

L. H. Kingsley, serving selectmen's warrants, 8.00 

L. H. Kingsley, posting quarantine cards, * 4.00 

L. H. Kingsley, notifying town officers, 2.00 
L. H. Kingsley, cash paid A. J. Bonneville, M. D., 

returning births, 7.25 

L. H. Kingsley, cash paid printing assessors' books, 7.75 

L. H. Kingsley, cash paid typewriting material,. 4.50 

L. H. Kingsley, cash paid stamps, paper and envelopes, 13.91 
L. H. Kingsley, cash paid express penholders, paste 

and pencils, 2.65 
L. H. Kingsley, cash paid voters' check list and tax 

collectors' books, ' 2.58 

David Billings, cash paid stationery and postage, 2.30 
David Billings, cash paid fumigating material, S. 

Conery house, 1.50 

David Billings, cash paid telephone charges, 2.18 

David Billings, cash paid printing, 2.25 

David Billings, cash paid car fare state paupers, 3.00 

David Billings, cash paid car fare for tramp, .20 



$1,046.32 
ORDINARY HIGHWAY EXPENDITURES. 

T. J. Ryan, superintendent, $ 200.00 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 349.97 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 269.10 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 26.63 

Willis Holden, team and labor, 5.75 

John Vollinger, team and labor, 7.50 

David Billings, team and labor, 8,00 



16 

James Mullins, team and labor, 8.00 

Whalen Brothers, team and labor, 10.38 

William Boyle, team and labor, 4.00 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 19.68 

L. L. Day, team and labor, 11.00 

Charles Harris, team and labor, 4.00 

O. S. & A. P. Graves, team and labor, 10.95 

B. M. Warner, team and labor, 32.50 

Daniel Sheehan, team and labor, 34.95 

D. W. Wells, team and labor, 8.10 

A. C. Bardwell, team and labor, 8.85 

John Karen, Jr., labor, 4.38 

F. H. Bardwell, labor, 1.78 

Joseph Kempisty, labor, 6.00 

Frank Dugal, labor, 39.62 

Stanly Reglewski, labor, 3.20 

Martin Janos, labor, 1.60 

David Laundry, labor, .75 

John Merrick, labor, .88 

George Steel, labor, 5.25 

Laurence Waltz, labor, 31.07 

Jacob Geiss, labor, 101.12 

John Fusie, labor, 19.25 

John Uric, labor, 2.40 

Michael Superba, labor, 11.27 

John Masty, labor, 9.52 

William Graf, labor. 1.75 

John Brur, labor, 5.00 

John Stenglein, labor, 3.00 

Charles W. Wade, water in tool house, 8.50 

Frank Betsolcl, labor, 13.00 

Frank Betsold, plank, 139.50 

Henry Carl, plank, 22.00 

A. L. Strong, plank, 1.60 

A. D. Montague, plank, 24.84 

City of Northampton, crushed stone, 5.15 

Howard & Smith, labor and supplies, 51.65 



17 



Norwood Engineering Co., catch basins, 

J. H. Howard, supplies 

A. D. Black, cutting edges road machine, 

A. W. Morton, 

M. J. Ryan, state commissioners ' hearing, 

E. W. & S. H. Field, labor, 

John Karen, sand, 

E. B. Dickinson, sand, 

A. L. Strong, sand, 

Estate C. D. Bardwell, roller, 
M. J. Ryan, supplies, 

B. & M. R. R., freight, 
W. H. Riley, Akron tile, 
J. P. Ryan, iron pipe, 
Shumway & Riley, Akron tile, 
Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 
George Eberlein, repairs, 
Patrick Brennan, labor, 
Gilbert Morton, labor, 

J. T. Fitzgibbons, labor, 



22.12 

6.06 
16.00 

2.00 
10.00 

1.60 
15.00 

2.10 
15.00 

1.50 
38.89 

2.10 
21.76 
35.76 
80.00 
55.48 
17.20 
42.87 

5.00 

3.00 



$1,926.88 



WEST HATFIELD STATE ROAD REPAIRS. 



T. J. Ryan, superintendent, 
J. S. Bardwell, steam roller, 
J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 
H. Shumway, team and labor, 
David Billings, team and labor, 
Frank Dugal, team and labor, 
Lawrence Waltz, team and labor, 
Jacob Geiss, team and labor, 



$28.00 
16.25 
12.34 
24.00 
22.00 
14.00 
12.25 
9.63 



$138.47 



18 

SCHOOL STREET. 

T. J. Ryan, superintendent, $15.00 

J. S. Bardwell, te^am and labor, 12.45 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 10.45 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 6.00 

J. L. Day, team and labor, 6.45 

F. H. Bardwell, team and labor, 8.00 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 8.20 

H. Godin, team and labor, 6.00 

Frank Dugal, labor, 6.31 

Lawrence Waltz, labor, 5.25 

Jacob Geiss, labor, 6.31 

Patrick Brennan, labor, .87 

E. B. Dickinson, sand, 14.00 

$105.29 



MAPLE STREET FILL. 

T. J. Ryan, superintendent, $ 18.00 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 30.00 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 4.00 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 11.00 

David Billings, team and labor, 16.00 

J. L. Day, team and labor, 14.00 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 10.00 

E. S. Warner, team and labor, 10.00 

Frank Dugal, labor, 18.00 

Stanley Regulewski, labor, 6.40 

Martin Janos, labor, 10.80 

Lawrence Waltz, labor, 5.25 

Jacob Geiss, labor, 5.25 

John Foosic, labor, 8.75 

Eddie Kempisty, labor, 10.80 

Melcher Kulesza, labor, 480 



19 

John Gendron, labor, 1.75 

Tony Paukoski, labor, 7.20 

Patrick Brennan, labor, 10.27 

$202.27 



MAIN STREET SIDEWALK. 

T. J. Eyan, superintendent, $ 51.00 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 66.00 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 52.00 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 34.00 

John Vollinger, team and labor, 24.75 

David Billings, team and labor, 20.00 

James Mullins, team and labor, 20.00 

William Boyle, team and labor, 12.00 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 29.00 

J. L. Day, team and labor, 26.00 

F. H. Bardwell, team and labor, 10.00 
P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 12.00 

G. A. Billings, team and labor, 16.00 
Prank Dugal, labor, 21.88 
Stanley Regulewski, labor, 8.00 
Martin Janos, labor, 8.00 
David Laundry, labor, 7.50 
John Merrick, labor, 9.19 
Lawrence Waltz, labor, 27.13 
Jacob Geiss, labor, 27.12 
John Foosic, labor, 8.75 
Eddie Kempisty, labor, 18.70 
Michael Gogel, labor, 6.75 
Tony Pankoski, labor, 6.40 
Patrick Brennan, labor, 26.63 
Thomas McGrath, labor, 10.88 
Andrew Drowdral, labor, 2,20 



20 

Burijle Bucrak, labor, 4.95 

Peter Shuenter, labor, 3.00 

Peter Dendelein, labor, 5.25 

Paul Wirgulewski, labor, 4.95 

Steven Varchula, labor, 16.00 

Alec Kosash, labor, 20.00 

Joseph Raboin, labor, 7.50 

John Stengleus, team and labor, 12.00 

Alfred Brers, team and labor, 20.00 

E. B. Dickinson, sand, 40.40 

A. H. Beers, surveying, 3.00 

$698.93 



MAPLE STREET SIDEWALK. 

T. J. Ryan, superintendent, $ 30.00 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 19.58 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 26.00 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 20.00 

David Billing's, team and labor, 27.00 

J. L. Day, team and labor, 12.00 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor. 14.00 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 5.00 

Nelson Allaire, team and labor. 6.00 

Alfred Brers, team and labor, 8.00 

Frank Dugal, labor, 12.00 

Stanley Regulewski, labor, 9.60 

Martin Janos, labor, 11.20 

Lawrence Waltz, labor, 8.75 

Jacob Geiss, labor, , 8.75 

John Foosic, labor, 9.38 

John Uric, labor, 4.80 

Eddie Kempisty, labor, 6.40 

Michael Gogel, labor, 5.25 

Tony Pankoski, labor, 6.40 



2\ 

Patrick Breiman, labor, 14.00 

Joseph Raboin, labor, 6.00 

A. H. Beers, surveying, 3.00 

$273.09 

STONE ROAD, BRIDGE STREET. 

T. J. Ryan, superintendent, $ 39.00 

J. S. Bardwell, labor, steam roller, 18.75 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 26.37 

EL Shumway, team and labor, 32.00 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 26.00 

David Billings, team and labor, . 28.00 

Whalen Brothers, team and labor, 8.00 

J. L. Day, team and labor, 18.00 

F. H. Bardwell, labor, 26.00 

James Mullins, labor, 2.00 

Charles Wade, labor on drain, 1.50 

Frank Dugal, labor, 16.00 

Stanley Regulewski, labor, 1.60 

Martin Janos, labor, 18.40 

David Laundry, labor, 4.50 

Lawrence Waltz, labor, 19.25 

Jacob Geiss, labor, 16.62 

John Foosic, labor, 14.00 

Eddie Kempisty, labor, 5.60 

Michael Gogel, labor, 3.00 

Patrick Brennan, labor, 21.00 

Alec Kosash, labor, 4.00 

City of Northampton, crushed stone, 72.00 

John S. Lane, crushed stone, 101.94 

William A. Bailey, brick, 8.50 

William A. Bailey, labor, 4.70 

Anthony Wickler, labor, 1.50 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 26.00 

$564.23 



22 



KINGSLEYS HILL. 



T. J. Ryan, superintendent, 


$ 27.00 


J. S. Bardwell, labor, steam roller, 


16.25 


J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 


16.33 


IT. Shumway, 


11.90 


David Billings, 


10.00 


Whalen Brothers, 


12.00 


F. H. Bardwell, 


4.00 


M. W. Boyle, 


12.00 


P. T. Boyle, 


1.00 


Frank Dugal, labor, 


14.00 


Lawrence Waltz, labor, 


14.00 


Jacob Geiss, labor, 


11.96 


John Foosic, labor, 


6.58 


City of Northampton, crushed stone, 


65.00 


John S. Lane, crushed stone, 


101.94 



$323.96 



WEST BROOK SPECIAL REPAIRS. 



T. J. Ryan, superintendent, 
J. S. Bardwell, team -and labor, 
Willis Holden, team and labor, 
Smith Briggs, team and labor, 
Carlton Crafts, team labor, 
Steven Vachula, team and labor, 
J. T. Fitzgibbons, team and labor, 
David Laundry, team and labor, 
Lawrence Waltz, 
Jacob Geiss, 
John Foosic, 
Patrick Brennan, 



$ 15.00 

22.00 

17.05 

12.00 

19.00 

15.00 

4.00 

4.50 

10.50 

10.50 

10.50 

8.75 



$148.80 



23 



BRADSTREET SPECIAL REPAIRS. 



T. J. Ryan, superintendent, 
J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 
H. Shumway, team and labor, 
Willis Holden, team and labor, 
William Boyle, team and labor, 
0. S. & A. P. Graves, labor, 
Abbert Morrb, labor, 
Frank Jones, labor, 
George S. Belden, labor, 
Smith Briggs, labor, 
Carlton Crafts, labor, 
Steven Vachula, labor, 
J, T. Fitzgibbons, labor, 
David Laundry, labor, 
Frank Dugal, labor, 
Lawrence Waltz, labor, 
Jacob Geiss, labor, 
John Foosic, labor, 
Peter Shuneter, labor, 
Stanley Garboski, labor, 



$ 27.00 
40.00 
32.00 
15.00 
32.00 
29.57 

2.50 
59.50 
24.00 
20.00 
19.00 
19.00 
20.00 
10.50 

2.75 
14.00 
14.00 
14.88 

7.50 

1.50 



BRADSTREET SEWER. 



$404.70 



T. J. Ryan, superintendent, 
John Merrick, 
Lawrence Waltz, 
Jacob Geiss, 
Eddie Kempisty, 
Patrick Brennan, 
John Philipek, 
Thomas McGrath, 



18.00 
1.75 

10.50 

10.50 
9.70 

10.50 
3.30 
5.25 



24 



Andrew Drondral, 


4.80 


Buryli Buerak, 


9.90 


Paul Wegelewski, 


8.25 


H. Shumway, 


8.00 


John Vollinger, 


1.75 




$102.20 


OLD BILLS. 




James Ryan, 


$10.50 


Alfred Brers, 


5.00 


James L. Boyle, 


1.75 


A. L. Strong, gravel, 1906, 


10.00 


J. S. Bardwell, 


10.64 



$37.89 
ADDITION TO NORTH HATFIELD SCHOOLHOUSE. 



A. C. Matthews, labor, 


$1,126.24 


C. N. Felts, supplies, 


159.54 


William H. Riley, labor, furnishing, 


332.90 


E. S. Crafts, cash paid for labor, 


178.95 


W. N. Potter & Son, material, 


9.45 


Edwin Murphy, labor, 


36.75 


I. Sadowski, labor, 


10.50 


Willis Holden, labor, 


25.37 


Steven Vachula, labor, 


8.00 


J. S. Bardwell, labor, 


4.00 


George Moore, labor, 


25.00 


Edwin Sanderson, labor, 


25.00 


L. S. Crafts, lumber, 


24.00 


Charles Field, labor, 


22.50 


C. W. Wodfram, labor, 


11.00 



$1,999.20 



25 

REPAIRS ON MAIN SCHOOL ROOM. 

A. C. Matthews, labor, $110.09 

William II. Riley, furnace, 150.00 

C. N. Fitts, supplies, 16.46 

E. S. Crafts, labor, 19.85 



$296.40 



RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN. 



Poor, 


$ 513.12 


Outside Poor, 


63.00 


State Aid, 


112.00 


Tree Warden, 


98.25 


Memorial Day, 


50.00 


Muster Day, 


75.00 


Fire Department, 


239.17 


Cemetery, 


100.00 


Memorial Building, 


188.92 


Street Lighting, 


787.46 


Library, 


296.60 


Sinking Fund, 


861.67 


Water Rates, 


500.00 


Temporary Loans, 


600.00 


State Road, 


357.13 


Contingencies, 


1,046.32 


South Main Street Sewer, 


2,000.59 


Ordinary repairs Highways and Bridges, 


1,926.88 


State Road Repairs, 


138.47 


School Street Expenditure, 


105.29 


Maple Street Fill Sidewalk, 


202.27 


Maple Street Sidewalk, 


273.09 


Main Street Sidewalk, 


698.93 


Stone Road Bridge Street, 


564.23 
323.96 


Kingsleys Hill, 



26 



North Hatfield Special Repairs, 


148.80 


Bradstreet Special Repairs, 


404.70 


Bradstreet Sewer, 


102.20 


Old Bills, 


37.89 


Schools, 


7,528.14 


School Dept., bills paid by former treasurer before 




March 25, 


101.00 


Evening Schools, 


62.39 


North Hatfield Addition, 


1,999.20 


North Hatfield Main Building Repairs, 


296.40 


Bonds for Town Officers, 


39.00 


Town Officers, 


1,290.00 



APPROPRIATIONS. 



$24,132.07 



Poor, $ 600.00 

Memorial Building, 150.00 

Bonds for Town Officers, 50.00 

Memorial Day, 50.00 

Firemen's Muster, > i 75.00 

Cemeteries, .' 100.00 

Highways and Bridges, 2,000.00 

Salaries for Town Officers, 1,400.00 

Public Library, 300.00 

Contingencies, 1,000.00 

Interest, 400.00 

Town Debt, 1,600.00 

School Physician, 150.00 

Water Rates, 500.00 

Tuition Smith Academy, 500.00 

Schools, 5,000.00 

South Main Street Sewer, 1,000.00 

Street Lighting, 850.00 

Permanent Roads, 1,000.00 

Gravel Sidewalk, Maple Street, 500.00 



27 

Evening School, 75.00 

Furnishing Addition North Hatfield Schoolhouse, 300.00 

Special Repairs North Hatfield, 150.00 

Special Repairs School Street, 500.00 



$18,250.00 



APPROPRIATIONS, 1908. 

South Main Street Sewer, $1,000.00 

Special Repairs, Bradstreet Road, 500.00 

Addition North Hatfield Schoolhouse from treasury, 1,600.00 



$3,100.00 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

RESOURCES. 



Balance in Treasury March 1, 1907, 


$ 719.44 


Town appropriation, 


5,000.00 


Trustees Smith Academy, 


500.00 


Dog fund, 


153.84 


State school fund, 


708.00 


State fund, superintendent, 


400.00 


City of Northampton, tuition, 


189.00 


City of Boston, 


16.50 


City of Boston, 


6.00 


Evening school, 


75.00 


Addition North Hatfield schoolhouse, 


1,600.00 


Furnishings, North Hatfield schoolhouse, 


300.00 




$9,667.78 


Bills paid by treasurer from Mar. 1 to Mar. 25, 1907, 


$ 101.00 


Total amount orders drawn on treasury, 


9,886.13 



1,987.13 



Overdrawn, $319.35. 



28 

EXPENDITURES. 

M. H. Bowman, superintendent, $ 490.40 

R. M. Woods, tuition, Smith Academy, 500.00 

Mrs. A. F. Forbes, 130.00 

Miss Margaret A. Ryan, , 384.00 

Miss Elizabeth Roof, 130.00 

Miss Florence I. MacMullen, 240.00 

Miss Helen I. Sadler, 240.00 

Miss Katherine W. Day, 384.00 

Miss Mary E. Breor, 384.00 

Miss Mary J. Mulcahy, 384.00 

Miss Sarah V. Kiley, 348.00 

Mrs. Grace W. Bardwell, 130.00 

Miss Hazel C. Cheney, 240.00 

Miss Mary Decker, 240.00 

Miss Mabel R. Farrar, 108.00 

Miss Julia E. Mellor, 216.00 

Miss Ruth C. Jackson, drawing teacher, 137.64 

Miss Alma J. Bridgman, music teacher, 141.87 

Miss Alma J. Bridgman, supplies, 1.70 

Expense attending teachers' meetings, 26.60 

Miss Julia E. Mellor, car fare, 4.50 

Connecticut Valley St. R. R., tickets, 33.50 

Burlep School, supplies, 1.45 

Howard & Smith, Coal, 383.72 

George H. Danforth, coal, 192.94 

Joseph Godin, drawing coal, 8.00 

Daniel Sheehan, drawing coal, 8.00 

F. G. Bardwell, wood, 5.00 

J. S. Bardwell, wood, 54.00 

J. S. Bardwell, sawing wood, 1.13 

James Orman, janitor, 136.50 

John Salvor, janitor, 53.80 

John Salvor, labor, 19.05 

Charles Flynn, janitor, 19.50 

Mrs. Catherine, sweeping and cleaning, 14.50 



29 

C. W. Wolfram, janitor and labor, 93.25 

Mrs. Conie Hilbert, janitor and labor, 62.50 

Claud and Silas Hubbard, janitors, 72.40 

Eli Frasier, 5.00 

Eli Frasier, 3 keys, .25 

Mrs. Louisa Shea, cleaning, 24.50 

Mrs. Anna Foosic, cleaning, 1.50 

Mrs. Helen Butzek, cleaning, 13.50 

Miss Conie Wickler, sweeping, 18.00 

Miss Lena Proulx, sweeping, ' 30.00 

Miss Anne Levetre, sweeping, 24.00 

Miss E. M. Graves, labor, 6.30 

John Stacrou, labor, 4.50 

Frank Betsold, repairs, 8.25 

Rupert D. Graves, repairs, 36.52 

F. J. Soffer, repairs, 6.36 

William P. Boyle, painting, 262.45 

J. M. Pierce, painting, 22.64 

John Monahan, labor, 18.00 

Oliver Zanoaraz, labor, 6.75 

John Wozok, labor, 12.00 

F. W. Schepps, labor, 13.55 

Louis Gould, labor, 4.25 

S. W. Kingsley, labor, 1.50 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 28.15 

William H. Riley, repairs, 57.87 

Shumway & Riley, repairs, 18.15 

James L. Boyle, labor, 6.75 

John Betsold, labor and supplies, 40.75 

H. S. Hubbard, labor, supplies, freight, 33.83 

H. S. Hubbard, taking school census, 16.00 

M. H. Bowman, telephone, supplies, etc., etc., 32.67 

L. H. Powers, labor and supplies, 76.25 

If. IT. Powers, state report, 5.00 

C. S. Crafts, book cases and freight, 75.54 

George H. Danforth, supplies, 1.35 

Foster Brothers, supplies, 12.29 



30 

M. J. Ryan, supplies, 14.25 

J. H. Howard, supplies, 5.25 

C. N. Fitts, furnishing, 69.01 
Charles W. Wade, labor, 1.00 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books and supplies, 42.54 
Ginn & Co., books and supplies, 25.04 
Edward E. Babb & Co., books and supplies, 24.17 
American Book Co., books and supplies, 37.04 

D. C. Heath & Co., books and supplies, 10.21 
Silver Burdett & Co., books and supplies, 50.84 
Rand McNally & Co., books and supplies, 10.50 
Milton Bradley & Co., books and supplies, 29.13 
Massery Young & Co., books and supplies, 28.00 
Mrs. Serrie A. Weaver, books and supplies, .90 
Leavenworth & Co., books and supplies, 80.00 
Frederick H. Brown, books and supplies, 5.00 
J. L. Hammett & Co., books and supplies, 150.89 



$7,528.14 



EVENING SCHOOL. 

A. J. Chidster, teaching, $50.00 

Claud H. Hubbard, janitor, 7.00 

Silas G. Hubbard, janitor, 5.00 

M. J. Ryan, supplies, .39 



$62.39 

LIST OF JURORS REPORTED BY THE SELECTMEN, 
FEBRUARY 29, 1908. 

Name. Occupation. 

John Denlein, Farmer 

Edgar H. Field, 
Michael P. Kiley, 
Thomas W. Ryan, Clerk 



31 



Charles S. Shattuck, 
Hugh McLeod, 
Charles W. Wade, 
Lawrence A. Powers, 
Joseph S. Wells, 
Reuben F. Wells, 
Thaddeus Graves, Jr., 
George Bitner, 
Edson W. Strong, 
Frederick T. Bardwell, 
Smith E. Briggs, 
Robert L. Belden, 
Rudolph W. Weber, 
Edward A. Ryan, 
MacL. LaMountain, 
John W. Kiley, 
Paul Baloise, 
G. Raymond Billings, 
Eugene Jubenville, 
Thomas M. O'Dea, 
Patrick W. Mullins. 



Gun Manufacturer 

Lathe Manufacturer 

Farmer 



Farmer and Carpenter 

Farmer and Sawyer 

Farmer 



DAVID BILLINGS, 

T. J. RYAN, 

C. E. WARNER, 



Selectmen of Hatfield. 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Selectmen and find them correct. 



E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor 
Hatfield, Mass., March 9, 1908, 



Treasurer's Report. 



L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in account with the Town of 

Hatfield. 

DR. 

To Cash received from R. Billings, Treasurer, $2,560.00 

To Cash received from H. E. Belden, Collector, 1906, 1,664.09 
To Cash received from A. L. Strong, Collector, 15,241.41 

To Cash received from Treas. Water Commissioners, 2,400.00 
To Cash received from Treas. Water Commissioners, 600.00 
To Cash received from District Court, fines and fees, 113.80 
To Cash received from Liquor License, 2,000.00 

To Cash received from Pool License, 2.00 

To Cash received from State, for Supt. of Schools, 400.00 

To Cash received from Income of Mass. School Fund, 708.00 
To Cash received from National Bank Tax, 788.62 

To Cash received from Corporation Tax, 381.04 

To Cash received from Street Railway Tax, 366.61 

To Cash received from Inspection of Animals, 27.50 

To Cash received for State Aid, 39.00 

To Cash received from Board of Charity, transporting 

paupers, 6.90 

To Cash received from Tuition of Children, 6.00 

To Cash received from Highway Commission, repairs, 187.25 
To Cash received from support and burial of paupers, 34.00 
To Cash received from City of Northampton, tuition, 189.00 
To Cash received from City of Northampton, aid for 

Gingras, 11.00 

To Cash received from City of Boston, tuition, 16.50 

To Cash received from J. E. Porter, load of stone, 2.00 



33 

To Cash received from Conn. Valley St. Ry., painting 

bridges, 45.00 

To Cash received from Town of Sunderland, aid J. 

Pudlesney, 12.00 

To Cash received from rent of Town Hall, 7.00 

To Cash received from Refunding of Dog Fund, 153.84 

To Cash received from Sale of Sadoski Supplies, 12.00 

To Cash received from Sale of plank, 1.20 

To Cash received from Richard B. Abbott, cemetery 

lot, ,50 

To Cash received from Estate J. D. Porter, sidewalk 

assessment, 96.01 

To Cash received from Fred Winzel, sidewalk assess- 
ment, 30.64 

To Cash received from H. D. Smith, sidewalk assess- 
ment, 5.53 

To Cash received from Mary Cleaval, sidewalk assess- 
ment, 5.53 

Cash received from Valentine Parader, sidewalk assess- 
ment, 13.85 

Cash received from Joseph Smith, sidewalk assess- 
ment, 21.61 

Cash received from James L. Day, sidewalk assessment, 19.23 
Cash received from Thomas M. Day, sidewalk assess- 
ment, 15.94 

Cash received from Rhoda W. Hubbard, sidewalk as- 
sessment, 41.97 

Cash received from H. S. Hubbard, sidewalk assess- 
ment, 47.50 

Cash received from William P. Boyle, sidewalk assess- 
ment, 37.64 

Cash received from Smith Academy, sidewalk assess- 
ment, 17.00 

$28,328.71 



34 
TO CASH RECEIVED FROM TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Two months' note. 5V 2 per cent, $2,000.00 

Northampton Inst, for Savings. 6 months, 

51/2 per cent. 5.000.00 

Northampton Institution for Savings, re- 
newal. 4V2 per cent. 3,500.00 

Hatfield Sinking Fund, demand note, 927.52 

$11,427.52 



$39,756.23 



CR. 

By Cash paid Selectmen's Orders. $24,132.07 

By Cash paid Interest on Water Bonds. 1,920.00 

By Cash paid State, % Liquor License, 500.00 

By Cash paid District Court, fees and expenses, 24.83 

By Cash paid Interest, Temporary Loans, 181.68 

By Cash paid Interest, Outstanding Loans, 177.33 

By Cash paid County Tax, 1,983.93 

By Cash paid State Tax, 1,760.00 

By Cash paid Repairs State Highway, 19.40 

Balance in Treasury, 456.99 

BY CASH PAID TEMPORARY AND OUTSTANDING 

LOANS. 

Jose, Parker & Co., note. Depot Road. $1,000.00 
Jose, Parker & Co.. note, Bradstreet Fill, 600.00 
Northampton Inst, for Savings, note, 

6 months, 5,000.00 

Two months 1 note. 2,000.00 

$ 8,600.00 

$39,756.23 



35 
IN ACCOUNT WITH H. E. BELDEN, COLLECTOR. 

DR. 



To Cash received, $1,664.09 

To Assessors' Orders of Abatement, 33.47 



$1,697.56 



CR. 

By Uncollected Taxes, $1,673.04 

By Interest on Taxes, 24.52 

$1,697.56 

IN ACCOUNT WITH A. L. STRONG, COLLECTOR, 

DR. 



To Cash received, 
To Uncollected Taxes, 
To Discount on Taxes, 
To Assessors ' Orders of Abj 


itement, 


$15,241.41 

5,740.95 

309.69 

16.65 

4t°l 30^ 70 




tpuXjOyJO. 1 U 




CR, 




By Assessors' Warrant, 
By Addition to Warrant, 
By Interest Collected, 




$20,966.48 

294.96 

; 44.26 




«p&ilj OXJO. 1 \J 


WATER SINKING FUND. 




DR. 




To 30 years ' 4 per cent Water Bonds, 


$48,000.00 




CR. 




By Sinking Fund, 




$11,901.93 



36 

summary of tow account, 
dr: 

OUTSTANDING NOTES. 

Jose, Parker & Co., Depot Road account, $3,000.00 
Hatfield Sinking Fund, demand note, 927.52 

Northampton Inst, for Savings, 6 months ' 

note, 3,500.00 

$7,427.52 

CR. 

By Uncollected Taxes, $5,740.95 

By amount due from Sidewalk Assess- 
ment, 503.17 

By amount due from State, ballasting 

road, 550.00 

By amount due from State Aid, 112.00 

By amount due from Inspection of Animals, 50.00 

By amount due from City of Northamp- 
ton, 40.00 

By Balance in Treasury, 456.99 

$7,453.11 

I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Town Treasurer and find them correct. 

E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, March 3, 1908. 



Water Commissioners' Report. 

The following is respectfully submitted as the Twelfth 
Annual Report of the Board of Water Commissioners : 

We have received the past year as follows: 
Balance of cash from last year's account, $ 627.97 

George C. Plynt, water on state road, * 3.10 

Sale of 1 inch water pipe, 2.60 

From connections and material, . 54.00 

Town of Hatfield, advance on construction, 600.00 
Cash from collection of water rates, 3,834.53 



$5,122.20 



We have paid the past year as follows : 

Town of Hatfield, on cash advanced, $ 600.00 

Town of Hatfield, on water rates, 2,400.00 

Charles W. Wade, for collections, 115.03 

Charles W. Wade, for labor and cash paid, 121.83 

Haydenville Co., bushing valves, 1.25 

W. H. Riley & Co., water gate and supplies, 68.41 

Norwood Engineering Co., supplies, 61.48 

Cuyler & Mohler, 1 inch galvanized pipe and lead, 292.92 

M. H. Drummond & Co., 4 inch cast iron pipe, 686.64 

Boston & Maine Railroad, freight, 14.64 

Kiley & Gleason, laying pipe, 606.01 

R. D. Graves, labor and materials, 58.23 

H. S. Gere & Sons, advertising, 3.25 

Gazette Printing Co., order book, 2.00 

P. H. Chew, record book, 8.00 

Balance cash on hand, \ 82.51 

;,:;;■„ $5,122.20 



38 

There are now 311 connections with private property, 83 
hydrants for fire protection, 5 water tanks, water in 5 school 
buildings, and in Memorial Hall. 

Extension of water main the past year has been 1,517 
feet of 4 inch cast iron pipe from the house of Mr. John C. 
Ryan to the top of Clay hill at a cost of $1,058.27 

2,972 feet of .1 inch galvanized iron pipe to the house 

of Mr. John Karen, 680.61 



Total cost of construction, $1,738.88 

There are now as follows: 

18,781 feet of 8 inch pipe, 
47,786 " 6 
25,370 " 4 

1,320 " 2 

9,858 " 1 

1,070 " % 



Total 104,185 feet of main pipe, and forty acres of land 
at the reservoir, making the cost of the system to March 1, 
1908, $55,414.75. 

CHARLES L. WARNER, 
DANIEL W. WELLS, 
MICHAEL J. PROULX. 

Hatfield Water Commissioners. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 2, 1908. 

I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 

Treasurer of the Board of Water Commissioners and find them 

correct 

E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor. 

Hatfield, Mass., March 2, 1908. 



Town Clerk's Report. 



The vital statistics for the Town of Hatfield for the year 
1907 are as follows : — 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



No. 


Males. 


Females. 


3 


3 





6 


4 


2 


1 


1 





9 


1 


8 


4 


1 


3 


5 


3 


2 


9 


6 


3 


11 


8 


3 


8 


4 


4 


6 


2 


4 


1 


1 





3 





3 



Total, 



66 



34 



32 



BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS. 





Father. 


Mother. 


Born in Canada, 


3 


2 


Born in the United States, 


23 


24 


Born in Poland, 


31 


32 


Born in Germany, 


2 


2 


Born in Hungary, 


4 


5 


Born in Ireland, 


3 


1 



Total, 



66 



m 



40 

BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS. 

1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 



49 47 | 52 64 68 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. 

No. 

January, 1 

February, 4 

April, 4 

May, 3 

June, 2 

July, ( 2 

August, 3 

September, 2 

October, 5 

November, 7 

Total, 33 

First marriage of both parties, 31 

Second marriage of both parties, 1 

Second marriage of groom, first of bride, 1 

33 

The oldest and youngest groom were fifty and twenty-one 
years of age respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were thirty-nine and 
eighteen years of age respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED. 





Groom. 


Bride. 


Born in the United States, 


14 


17 


Born in Poland, 


11 


11 


Born in Ireland, 





1 



4J 



2 





3 


3 


1 





2 


1 



Born in Germany, 
Born in Hungary, 
Born in Russia, 
Born in Canada, 



33 33 

MARRIAGES FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS. 
1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 



21 



24 



17 



30 



DEATHS BY MONTHS. 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 

Total, 



Under 1 year of age, 
Between 1 and 5 years, 
Between 5 and 10 years, 
Between 10 and 20 years, 
Betwene 20 and 30 years, 
Between 30 and 40 years, 



43 



22 



32 



No. 


Males. 


Females. 


3 


2 


1 


4 


2 


2 


1 


1 





6 


3 


3 


5 


5 





6 


2 


4 


4 


2 


2 











2 





2 


5 


1 


4 


1 


1 





6 


3 


3 



No. 


Males. 


Females. 


9 


4 


5 


4 


1 


3 


5 


3 


. 2 


3 


3 





2 





2 


1 


1 






42 

Between 40 and 50 years, 3 12 

Between 50 and 60 years, 4 3 1 

Between 60 and 70 years, 4 3 1 

Between 70 and 80 years, 3 2 1 

Between 80 and 90 years, 4 1 3 

Between 90 and 100 years, 10 1 

43 22 21 



Age of the oldest person deceased (female) 95 y 



ears. 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 

Classified according to the nomenclature adopted by the State 
Board of Registration. 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES. 

Diphtheria, 2 

Scarlet Fever, 5 

Malarial Fever, 1 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 

Cancer, 2 

Tuberculosis, 3 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Nephritis, 3 

Pneumonia, 6 

Cirrhosis of Liver, 3 

Bronhcitis, Chronic, 2 

Heart Disease, 3 

Gastric Ulcer, • 1 

Blood Poisoning, 1 



43 



DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 



Appendicitis, 
Infantile Debility, 
Premature Birth, 
Still Born, 



VIOLENT DEATHS. 



Pell down stairs, 
Run over by cars, 
Accidental drowning, 



Total, 



43 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED. 



Franklin K. Porter, 
John Burke, 
Alice Brennan, 
Charlotte G. Wilkie, 
Charles L. Graves, 
Augusta Wells, 
Sophica Ziezulewiycz, 
Charles Wells,, 
Michael Chandler, 
Edwin M. Graves, 
Harriet E. Belden, 
Helena Jalinski, 
William Shea, Jr., 
Annie Sulick, 
Katherin Shea, 
Alice I. Marsh, 
Alice L. Bardwell, 
William G. McGrath, 
Joseph Waskiewitcz, 
Katherine Korzash, 



Ella Brennan, 
James Brennan, 
Edward Brennan, 
Joseph Proulx, 
Mary Gogle, 
James A. Cutter, 
Leroy E. Casten, 
Caleb D. Bardwell, 
Antoine Zaromber, 
Mary A. King, 
Donald F. Warner, 
Mary Powers, 
John B. Smith, 
Kuningunder Chandler, 
Boleslawa Wysocki, 
Chloe C. Morton, 
Charles E. Hubbard, 
Marion Dickinson, 
Champion Dickinson. 



44 

DOG LICENSES. 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending 
November 30, 1907, with the receipts and settlements of the 
account with the County Treasurer, is as follows : 

87 male dogs at $2 each, $174.00 

6 female dogs at $5 each, 30.00 

$204.00 



Less fees, 93 dogs at 20 cents each, 18.60 



$185.40 
Respectfully submitted, 
L. H. KINGSLEY, Town Clerk. 



Assessors 5 Report. 



Value of assessed personal estate, $ 331.778.00 
Value of assessed real estate, 1,087,399.00 



Total value of assessed estate, 


$1,419,177.00 


Value of assessed buildings, 


$603,880.00 




Value of assessed land, 


483,519.00 






tbl AQ7 QQQ f\f\ 




Jpl 


,W 1 ,<JUV.\J\J 


Number of male pole assessed, 




549 


Number of residents assessed on property, 


334 


All others (corporations, etc.), 


) 


32 

— 366 


Number of non-residents assessed on property, 


45 


All others, 




26 

-— 71 


Number of persons assessed on 


property, 


437 


For poll tax only, 




279 

716 


Rate of total tax per $1,000, 




$14.00 


Number of horses assessed (4 n 


mles) , 


467 


Number of cows, 




328 


Number of neat cattle, 




54 


Number of swine, 




18 


Number of fowls, 




1,707 


Number of dwelling houses, 




331 


Number of acres of land, 




9,238 


State tax, 


$1,779.40 




County tax, 


1,983.93 




Town tax, 


16,900.00 




Overlayings, 


303.15 


$20,966.48 



46 

Estimated bank and corporation tax, 1,350.00 

Conn. Val. St. Ry. Co. excise tax, 290.96 

Value of property exempt from taxation, Chapter 12, 
Section 5, Revised Laws: ............. 

Literary Institutions, $68,955.63 

Church property, 27,000.00 

—$95,955.63 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN VOLLINGER, 
JAMES L. DAY, 
L. H. KINGSLEY. 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



Report of Sinking Fund 
Commissioners. 



We have the following amounts deposited to the credit 
of the Sinking Fund: 

Northampton Institution for Savings, $ 819.92 

Haydenville Savings Bank, 1,271.00 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, 463.48 

Florence Savings Bank, 1,169.48 

Easthampton Savings Bank, 250.53 

Town of Hatfield water bond 4%, 1,000.00 

Boston & Maine Railroad bonds 4%, 2,000.00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co., bonds, 4%, 2,000.00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co, notes, 5%, 2,000.00 

Town of Hatfield, note, 4%%, 927.52 



$11,901.93 



M. J. RYAN, 
R. M. WOODS, 
E. S. AVARNER, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor, 
Hatfield, Mass., March 2, 1908, 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING MARCH J, 1908, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

HENRY S. HUBBARD, Chairman, 1909. 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 1908. 

LAWRENCE A. POWERS, Secretary, 1910. 
M. H. BOWMAN, Superintendent. 



Truant Officers* 

S. W. KINGSLEY and A. L. STRONG. 

Authorized to sign certificates for children between the 
ages of 14 and 16, M. H. Bowman. 



School Census, September 7, 1907* 

Number of boys betwen the ages of 5 and 15, 136 

Number of girls between the ages of 5 and 15, 128 



Total, 264 

Number of boys between the ages of 7 and 14, 94 

Number of girls between the ages of 7 and 14, 87 

Total, 181 



52 



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Superintendent's Report. 



To the School Committee of Hatfield: 

I hereby present to you, and through you to the citizens 
of the town, my third annual report. It includes the reports 
of the Supervisor of Drawing, the Supervisor of Music arid 
the statistics for the year 1907. 

The year has been characterized by an unusual number 
of absences. These were caused almost entirely by sickness 
and fear of contagion. Yet, commendable advancement has 
been made and the work has shown desirable energy on the 
part of teachers and pupils. When from year to year the 
attempt is made to formulate in words the advancement made 
by any one school, language fails to express the desired 
thought. The number of facts memorized is unimportant, but 
the uplift that has come to the child is greatest of all. 

A brief outline course of studies has been placed in each 
school, and the reading material has been substantially 
increased. The day of old-fashioned readers is largely past. 
The advent of bright, finely illustrated books suited to all 
grades and containing facts that are attractive and complete 
in themselves has ushered in an age of happy helps for the 
children. Pages might be written upon this subject, but it is 
sufficient to record that as means permit the best is being pro- 
vided for each pupil. 

From the Center grammar school a class of eighteen was 
graduated last June. Sixteen of these entered the Academy 
at the opening of the fall term, and have done acceptable 
"work. Owing to the departure of so large a number the 
school is smaller than last year; but with the opening of the 
fall term 1908, the school ought to assume it usual size. 



56 

With the commencement of the fall term a new and very 
pleasant room was opened at West Brook for the upper grades 
of that school. Forty-seven pupils were enrolled in the two 
schools at this place, twenty-four of which were in the gram- 
mar room. The work of this school during the past several 
years, though under experienced and very efficient teachers, 
could not be made as thorough as it ought to be. With a 
division of the pupils and work far better results are being 
secured. Furthermore there is every reason to think that for 
years in the future the two rooms will meet all practical needs, 
and that equal opportunities will be given to those that attend 
these schools. 

During the summer vacation every schoolroom in the town 
was thoroughly cleaned, calcimined. repaired, and nodusto 
applied to the floor. If there be any doubt as to the physical 
benefit and moral uplift of these changes, visit the schools and 
ask teachers and pupils whether they enjoy the new sur- 
roundings. The rooms are to be further beautified in the near 
future by pictures of a high grade hung on suitable moulding. 
These pictures were secured by the united efforts of the Book 
Club, teachers and children. Whatever honor accrues is fully 
due to the ladies of the Club, who have striven most patiently 
and faithfully to make the environment of the children pleas- 
ant and attractive. We think that a personal visit by the 
parents to any of the schools will so convince them of the 
helpfulness of this effort, that what has been done will only 
prove to be a beginning of better and brighter surroundings 
for the children. 

In addition to the excellent work performed by the Medi- 
cal Inspectors of the schools, whose report will be found on 
another page, the usual annual tests relating to sight and 
hearing have been made by the teachers. Reviewing the work 
of the past year, we believe that most parents are ready and 
willing to co-operate with the school authorities in securing 
for the children necessary treatment for defective vision or 
hearing:. 



57 

In concluding I desire to thank the School Committee and 
all others that have aided in rendering" the schools effective. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MORTIMER H. BOWMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 
Hatfield, February 10, 1908. 



58 



SCHOOL CALENDAR. 

Spring Term (12 weeks), March 30 — June 12. 
Fall Term (15 weeks), Sept. 2— Dec. 18. 
Winter Term (9 weeks), Jan. 4— March 5. 

RESIGNATIONS. 

Grammar, Arabel F. Forbes, resigned. 
West Brook, Grace W. Bardwell, resigned. 
Bradstreet, Mabel K. Farrar, resigned. 

LIST OF PICTURES SELECTED FOR THE 

HATFIELD SCHOOLS. 

Aurora. — Guido Reni. 

The Gleaners.— Millet. 

Dance of The Nymphs. — Corot. 

Sir Galahad.— G. F. Watts. 

The Twelve Year Old Head of Christ. — Hofmann. 

The Brown Lion. 

The Shepherdess. — Le Rolle. 

The Horse Fair. — Rosa Bonheur. 

The Madonna Grandueca. — Raphael. 

The Madonna of the Napkin.— Murillo. 

The End of the Day. — Adan. 

The Song of the Lark. — Breton. 

At the Drinking Trough. — Dupre. 

Three of the Bambini. — Delia Robbia. 

The Holy Family.— Murillo. 

The Divine Shepherd.— Murillo. 

Don Balthazar Carlos. — Velasquez. 

St. John the Baptist. — Andrea del Sarto. 

Children of the Shell.— Murillo. 



Report of School Physician 



To the School Committee of Hatfield, Mass., Mr. M. II. Bow- 
man, Superintendent : — 

Dear Sir: — The School Physicians beg to make the fol- 
lowing report: Two hundred and forty-three pupils in the 
schools of Hatfield have been thoroughly examined early in 
spring and autumn terms. Further visits and examinations 
have been made as the Teachers' Board of Health, Superin- 
tendent and School Committee have requested. Some pupils 
have been sent home when necessary for their own good or for 
sake of school, even with scarlet fever before development. 

The school buildings are being improved hygienically, 
and the pupils average well in health. 

There are two hundred and six unvaccinated pupils, and 
we would suggest that announcement be made in the spring, 
1908, that no pupil can enter Hatfield schools the following 
autumn except they are vaccinated, according to laws of state. 

Upon several occasions the prompt fumigation of school 
rooms has undoubtedly prevented epidemics of scarlet fever 
and diphtheria. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. J. BONNEVILLE, 
CHARLES A. BYRNE. 



February 1, 1908. 



Report of Supervisor of Drawing 



Mr. M. II. Bowman , Superintendent of Schools: — 

* 

The work in drawing has steadily advanced during the 
past year. New and more difficult problems are now T at- 
tempted. While the results are pleasing, there is still much 
to be labored for. In the lower grades some entirely new 
branches of work are being tried, such as the making of 
objects by means of paper folding and cutting. The children 
are doing excellent work in this line. 

One thing which has greatly aided the work is the enthu- 
siasm which the majority of the children show. I feel this is 
chiefly due to the influence of the teachers. I wish to thank 
them for it, and for the hearty co-operation that has made 
the work a pleasure to me. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTH C. JACKSON, 

Supervisor of Drawing. 



Vocal Music 



Mr. M. II. Bowman, Superintendent of Schools: — 

In submitting a report of the work in school music, it is 
difficult to make a just estimate. 

In some respects the work is gratifying to teachers and 
myself. In others it is unsatisfactory. The work is being car- 
ried on in these several lines, — song work, individual work, 
sight singing and theoretical work. The drill work required 
in every point calls for patient and conscientious work on the 
part of the teachers. They should have the sympathetic co- 
operation of parents and friends in their efforts to help each 
child. 

I would cordially invite all parents and friends and mem- 
bers of the school board to visit any room with me at the giv- 
ing of any lesson. This w r ould be an encouragement to all the 
workers. 

Respectfully, 

ALMA J. BRIDGMAN. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE- 



TOWN OFFICERS 



-OF THE- 




TOWN OF HATFIELD 



-FOR THE- 



YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, 1909 



Heraijd Job Print, 
Northampton, Mass. 



Articles in the Warrant for Town Meeting, 
March 15, 1909. 



Article 1. — To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. — To choose all necessary Town officers for the 
ensuing year — Town Clerk ; three Selectmen ; one Assessor 
for three years; Town Treasurer; one School Committee for 
three years; one Water Commissioner for three year; one 
Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years; one Trustee for 
Public Library for three years; Auditor; Tree Warden; Elector 
under the will of Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; Six Constables 
and to vote on the question, — "Yes" or "No" — Shall License 
be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in this Town? 
All the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. Also, to be 
voted on seperate ballot, the question — "Yes" or "No" — 
Shall an Act passed by the General Court in the year 1908, 
entitled, An Act to provide for the protection of forest or 
sprout lands from fire, be accepted by this Town? 

Article 3. — To hear the reports of various town officers 
and act thereon. 

Article 4. — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5.— To take action in relation to maintenance and 
repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing year. 

Article 6. — To take action in relation to raising money to 
defray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 7. — To see what action the Town will take in re- 
lation to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 



Article 8. — To see if the Town will make an appropriation 
for Memorial Day. 

Article 9.^To take action in relation to the support of 
the poor for the ensuing year. 

Article 10. — To see if the Town will make an appropri- 
ation for the care of cemeteries for the ensuing- year. 

Article 11. — To see if the Town will employ a teacher of 
music in the public schools for the ensuing year, and make 
an appropriation for the same. 

Article 12. — To see if the Town will appropriate money 
for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children in Smith 
Academy, who are of suitable age and attainments to attend 
High. School. 

Article 13. — To see if the Town will make an appropri- 
ation for repairs on school houses. 

Article 14. — To see if the Town will employ a teacher of 
drawing in the public schools the ensuing year, and make an 
appropriation for the same. 

Article 15. — To see if the Town will make an appropri- 
ation for the Public Library the ensuing year. 

Article 16. — To see if the Town will make an appropri- 
ation for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 17. — To authorize the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, or a majority thereof, to borrow 
during the municipal year beginning March 1, 1909, in an- 
ticipation of the collection of taxes of said year such sums of 
money as may be necessary for the current expenses of the 
Town, but not exceeding the total tax levy for said year, 
giving the notes of the Town therefor, payable within one 
year from the dates thereof. All debts incurred under 
authority of this vote shall be paid from the taxes of the 
present municipal year. 



Article 18. — To see if the Town will make an appropri- 
ation for lighting the public streets the ensuing year. 

Article 19. — To see if the Town will make an appropri- 
ation for the employment of one or more School Physicians, 
in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906. 

Article 20. — To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
remaining sections (43, 44, 45, ) Chapter 19, of the Revised 
Laws, on sidewalks. 

Article 21. — To see if the Town will vote to accept a set 
of By-Laws, as herewith submitted. 

Article 22. — To see if the Town will vote to co-operate 
with its mother- town of Hadley in celebrating its 250th 
Anniversary, next August, and appoint a Committee of Ar- 
rangements to represent this Towm. 

Article 23. — To see if the Town will vote to build per- 
manent roads of stone or other material, on Elm street, from 
Bank's Corner, east to the Israel Raboin place, and on Main 
street, opposite Geo. A. Billings' place, north to opposite the 
Memorial Hall, and make an appropriation for the same. 

Article 24. — To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children attend- 
ing the Industrial School at Northampton. 

Article 25. — To see if the Town will vote an appropriation 
for purchasing any supplies or apparatus needed by the Fire 
Department. 

Article 26. — To see if the Town will vote to extend the 
Water Main, from James Walsh's to top of Clay Hill, as 
recommended by your Water Commissioners. 

Article 27. — To see if the Town will vote to extend the 
Sewer System on Main street, from Memorial Hall to residence 



6 

of C. S. Shattuck, and on Elm street, west from B. M. Warner*s 
700 feet, and make an appropriation for the same. 

Article 28. — To see if the Town will vote to improve and 
harden Cronin's Hill and approaches, and make an appropri- 
ation for the same. 

Article 29. — To see if the Town will vote to extend its 
Sewer System from Old Ferry Road North to John J. Breors, 
and make an appropriation for the same. 

Article 30. — To see if the Town will vote to rebuild the 
bridges at foot of Cronin's Hill, Cow Bridge and bridge near 
Strong's Mill, and make an appropriation for the same. 

Article 31. — To see if the Town will approve of the 
contract made by the Board of Selectmen with the Amherst 
Gas Co., of Amherst, Mass., to light the streets of Hatfield. 



Selectmen's Report. 



To the Citizens of Hatfield, Mass. 

Gentlemen: — In accordance with the requirements of the 
Public Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for the 
year ending March 1, 1909, is respectfully submitted. 

In June 1908 your Selectmen received a petition from all 
the residents of Elm street for a permanent road. from Bank's 
Corner to the Raboin place, a distance of 1,500 feet, also one 
from residents of Main street for a permanent road from the 
G. A. Billings place to Memorial Hall, 800 feet ^nd your 
Board estimate the cost at $1,800.00 for a good stone road. 

Article 27. — To see if the Town will extend its Sewer 
System. We find it will take 2,400 feet to C. S. Shattuck's 
place, and 700 feet on Elm street to connect with the present 
sewer there, and we estimate the cost at $1,400.00. 

The past year for new work we spent $715.98 on Main 
and Maple streets, and you raised $1,000.00 for 1907 work, a 
total of $1,715.98. 

In regard to the 3 bridges mentioned in Article 30, will 
say they will have to be built this year. They now have 
plank abutments and your Board recommend concrete abut- 
ments for all of them and iron girders. Your Superintendent 
estimates the cost complete at $500.00. 

We have contracted with the Amherst Gas Co., of Amherst 
Mass., to light the streets in Hatfield, Main to Ferry Road 21 
lights, Maple and Elm streets 19 lights, School and Prospect 
streets 22 lights, King street 6 flights, Bradstreet and Depot 
road 16. Total of 84 lights. 59 lights @ $16.00 per light, 
$944.00, and Bradstreet and King street, and 3 lights to Ferry 
road, 25 @ $18.00 per light, $450.00— all additional lights the 



8 



Same ratios. We have drawn up this contract so it is not 
binding on either party until accepted by the town, March 15 
1909. 



STATE AID EXPENDITURES 



Richard B. Abbott, 

Charles R. Crafts, 

Mrs. Sarah W. Bardwell, 



$15 00 
24 00 
48 00 

$87 00 



POOR EXPENDITURES 



Mrs. F, T. Vining, board Mary J. Manchester, $114 00 

A. J. Bonneville, med. attendance M. J. Manchester, 2 50 

Burial expenses, M.J. Manchester, 33 00 

Boston & Maine R. R., rent Mrs. Denvroi, 78 00 

Thaddeus Graves, house rent Shea family, 54 00 

Howard & Smith, coal for Shea family, 42 27 

Clothes for Shea family, 15 00 

M. J. Ryan, supplies Shea family 150 15 

J. H. Howard, supplies Shea family, 85 57 

M.J. Ryan, supplies Margaret O'Neil, 55 10 

Howard & Smith, coal Margaret O'Neil, 9 82 

Town of Williamsburg, aid Wm. Matra and family, 117 10 

C. N. Clark, house rent Gendron family, 54 00 

City of Northampton, aid Joseph Prew and family 81 80 

med. attendance Wm Prew family 5 50 

" - aid Christina Wenzel, 95 00 

A.J. Bonneville, med. attendance John Cszoswick 2 00 

Wm. Creaszere, 4 00 

Valentina Kiakoski, 10 00 



$1,008 81 



OLD BILLS 
J. B. O'Donnell, counsel fee, 



$552 00 



MEMORIAL BUILDING 



Howard & Smith, coal, 


$49 49 


A. L. Strong, wood, 


17 25 


L. H. Kingsley, janitor, 


75 00 


Hatfield Gas Co., gas, 


10 52 




$152-26 


WATER RATES 




Hatfield Water Works, 


$500 00 


STREET LIGHTING 




Hatfield Gas Co., 


$891 66 


TREE WARDEN 




Harry Godin, 1907 bill, trimming trees, 


$15 00 


1908 " 


10 00 


Wm. Carty, 1907 


10 00 


H. J. Kelvey, 


11 70 


Paul Hamdras, 


1 50 


Thos. McGrath, 


2 50 


Valentin Pasader, 


3 50 


Fred W. Shepp, bolting tree, 


5 00 


P. J. Whalen, 


18 10 



CEMETERIES 
F. H. Bar dwell, treasurer, 

BONDS FOR TOWN OFFICERS 

W. M. Cochran, treasurer, 
W. M. Cochran, collector, 



$77 30 



$100 00 



$24 00 
15 00 



$39 00 



$43 78 


4 


00 


39 


71 


10 


25 


45 


00 


10 


00 


7 


53 


75 


00 


9 


40 


51 


40 


5 


65 



JO 

MEMORIAL DAY 

C. K. Morton, $75 00 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

W. R. Huntting Co., books, 

Wm. G. Atkins, printing and cards, 

Bsidgman & Lyman, books, 

J. W. Heffernan, books, 

Hall & Locke Co., books, 

Library Bureau, case, 

Marion Chartan, repairs on books, 

CM. Barton, librarian, 

cataloguing, 

re-cataloguing, 

ex. and supplies, 

* $301 72 

MUSTER DAY 

L. J. Pelissier, chief, $75 00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

W. L. Chilson, collar and repairs, $10 25 

C. W. Marsh, varnishing hose wagon, 5 00 

B. & M. R. R., freight on hose, 90 

Damase Lamoreaux, fitting collar, 2 00 

A. B. Wolfram, painting and lettering 4 hose wagons, 48 00 

Boston Woven Hose Co., - 160 00 

H, W. Ross, 5 prs Latch haims and snaps 81 75 

H. W. Wolfram, men and horse at fire, 8 00 

L. J. Pelissier, horse at fire, 4 00 

John J. Betsold, horse at fire, ' 3 00 

storing hose wagon, 5 00 

drying hose, 3 00 

H. E- Graves, repairs on harness, 1 40 



a 



£L W. Marsh, storing hose wagon, horse at fire, 


7 00 


T. M. Day, 


5 00 


C. H. Crafts, 


5 00 


Fred Wen z el, 


5 00 



FOREST FIRE WARDEN 



$354 30 



J. S. Newman, 
George Saffer, 
John B. Bitner. 
John Steele, 
George Steele, 
John Vollinger, 
John J . Betsold, 
A. L. Strong, 
John M. Strong, 
H. W. Wolfram, 
C. H. Crafts, 
P. Bokun, 

E. C. Murphy, 

Sam 

Timothy Reagan, 
James Bokun, 
M. E. Lyons, 

S, Knight, 
Caryll Crafts, 

F. T. Bardwell, 
John Noskie, 
A. M. Bardwell, 
C. S. Venibler, 
Geo. P. Graves, 
E. N. Dickinson, 
E. S. Crafts, 

R. H. Bardwell, 
J. R. Coffey, , 
H. W. Briggs, 



$4 80 



1 


20 




80 


2 


80 




40 




40 


1 


20 


6 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


1 


40 


1 


40 


1 


20 


1 


40 




80 


1 


40 


1 


40 


1 


20 


1 


40 


1 


40 




60 




60 


1 


20 




60 


1 


20 



$47 80 



TOWN OFFICERS 

David Billings, Selectman, 1907, 
T.J.Ryan, 
C. Edward Warner 

M. J. Proulx, Water Commissioner, 1907 
D.W.Wells, 
Chas. L. Warner 

James L. Day, services as Assessor, 1908, 
E. W. Strong, 
L. H. Kingsley, 

H. S. Hubbard, School Committee, 1907, 

1908, 
L. A. Powers, 1908, 

John J. Betsold, " " 1908, 

A. L. Strong, collector, 1907, 
L. H. Kingsley, town clerk, 

treasurer, 
Samuel F. Billings, registrar of voters, 
Wm. H. Belden, 
Thos. W.Ryan, 



SCHOOL INSPECTION 

A.J. Bonneville, 1907, $50 00 

C. A. Byrne, 50 00 



$150 


00 


, 75 


00 


75 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


23 


75 


75 


00 


, 116 


25 


' 25 


00 


15' 


00 


20 


00 


25 


00 


200 


00 


300 


00 


100 00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


$1,254 00 



$100 00 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
W. & L. E. Gurley, utensils for sealing, $116 98 



J3 

CONTINGENT 

Herald Job Print, reports, $85 00 

E. L. Graves, postage on reports, .; 8 14 

Scott Harris, care town clock; 10 00 

" hall, ^ 4 50 

John McHugh, Jr., expenses to Tewksbury, 10 50 

J. W. Heffernan, one journal, 3 00 

Northampton Daily Herald, printing, 1 88 

Metealf & Co., ballot printing, . 12 50 

H. S. Gere & Sons, printing, \ 1 75 

J. B. O'Donnell, counsel fee, 2 00 

Herald Job Print, stationery and printing, 6 50 
E. B. Dickinson, auditor, 1907, . { , 5 00 

E. S. Warner, inspection beef, veal and hogs, 86 00 

quarantine, 10 00 

Johnson's Book Store, tax coll. book, > 1 81 

MeMillan Book Co., 1 record book, > 13 20 

H. D. Smith, police duty, 2 00 

Theo. M. Connors, counsel liquor case, 5 00 

injunction case, 25 00 

Wm. P. Boyle, repairs on Town Hall, 2 25 

paint, brushes, etc., 7 35 

Gazette Ptg. Co., tax bills, 4 75 

R. W. Weber, ballot clerk, 2 00 

Oliver Walker & Son, insurance on clock, 15 00 

H. S. Gere & Son, printing Wickles petition, 4 65 

Herald Job Print, two order books, 5 50 

T, Graves, Jr., ballot clerk, 2 00 

A. J. Bonneville, fumigating E. Field house, 2 00 

County of Hampshire, cost of petition M. J. Ryan, 5 00 

L. A. Waltz, constable, 3 00 

J. T. Powers, " 2 00 

Scott Harris, care Town clock, 10 00 

" hall, 1 00 

mowing " lawn, 5 00 

E. S. Warner, inspection neat cattle and swine, 60 00 



14 

E. E. Davis, surveying maps for sewers. 31 60 

and maps of Main St., 47 45 

sidewalk, " 15 30 

maps and attending hearing, 25 60 

George Eberlein, repairs Mrs. H. S. Hubbard carriage 5 00 

H, S. Gere & Son, printing probate, Wickles, 3 00 

Hatfield Gas Co., gas, Town hall, 15 09 

A. L. Strong, wood, 10 00 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber for hearse house, 7 20 

A. C. Bardwell, repairs on <<• 20 60 

G. Henry Clark, cleaning town clock, 5 00 

A. B. Black, snow plow, 63 70 

B. & M. R R, freight, snow plow, 3 60 
A. J, Bonneville, returns 37 births, 9 25 

C. A. Byrne, "52 " 13 00 
Fred Wentzel, services as Constable, 11 00 
L. J. Pelissier, fish and game warden, 5 00 
T. M. Connor, counsel fee and notices, 19 00 
L. H. Kingsley, recording births, marriages, deaths, 56 80 

serving selectmen's warrants, 8 00 

notifying Town officers, 2 00 

cash for supplies, etc., 13 59 

typewriter, 6 35 

moderator's gavel, 50 

cemetery deed recorded, 50 

C. K. Morton, elector, 10 00 

A. J. Bonneville, fumigating Holt house, 3 00 

E. N. Dickinson's, 2 50 



$838 91 



SMITH ACADEMY 
Trustees Smith Academy, tuition, , $500 00 

SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 

Miss Helen I. Sadler, teaching, $126 00 

Florence I. McMullen, " 120 00 



15 



Miss Julia E. Miller, 


teaching, 


$116 96 


Mary Decker, 




353 25 


"Hazel Chase Cheney, 




352 00 


; Margaret A. Ryan. 




387 20 


Katherine W. Day, 




387 20 


Mary E. Brion, 1 




386 10 


Mary J. Mulcahy, 




387 95 


Sarah V. Kiley, 




352 75 


Edith L. Leland, 




225 00 


Lulu L. Burbank, 




232 00 


Ethel P. More, 




217 80 


Lucile Gravestine, drawing 




100 00 


Christina A. Reece, singing 




88 00 


Ruth C. Jackson, drawing 




48 00 


Alma J. Bridgmon> music 




44 00 


M. H. Bowman, superintendent, 


555 60 


H. S. Hubbard, freight and express, 


3 50 


Mrs. Louise Shea, cleaning, 


6 00 


H. W. Wolfram, repairs, 


4 75 


Conn. Valley St. Railway Co., tickets, 


31 25 


R. D. Graves, repairs, 


3 90 


Ginn & Co., books and supp' 


ies, 92 30 


Rand, McNally & Co., 


' .'••■■' 


50 80 


Milton Bradley Co., 


t < 


32 06 


A, S. Barnes & Co., 


' ' 


32 65 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 


i i 


41 61 


Silver, Burditt & Co., 


' -' 


64 71 


J. L. Hammett & Co., 


' ' 


124 86 


L. G. Hinebauch, 


' ' 


16 75 


F. H. Crittenden, 


7 15 


Howard A. Smith, coal, / 


569 30 


G. H. Danforth, and supplies, 


10 40 


Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 


98 16 


M. H. Bowman, school r r tickets, 


84 80 


M: H. Bowman, telephone, postage and s 


upplies, 22 62 


F. J. Saffer, repairs, 


9 25 


C. S. Shattuck, team and labor, 


4 00 


David Laundry, 






4 50 



u 

F. W. Schepp, sawing wood, 4 03 

H. W. Wolfram, team and labor, 1 10 

John J. Betzhold, " 20 00 

H. S. Hubbard, express and ' ■ 8 53 

Masury Young Co., nodusto 29 40 

J. A. Sullivan, supplies, 2 88 

Joseph Wilson, repairs Hill school, 45 65 

F. L. Betzhold. " 62 20 

Wm. P. Boyle, " 99 01 

John Evans. " 19 50 

C. W. Wolfram, " and janitor, 46 00 

David Laundry, labor, 4 50 

H. W. Wolfram, repairs, 2 50 

Shumway & Riley, on furnace, 10 90 

W. H. Riley & Co., " and new " 160 30 

T. Graves, Jr., school census, 18 50 

Foster Bros., supplies, 9 25 

O. Belden & Sons, mowing lawn, 10 00 

Frank Saffer/ labor, 3 10 

R. D. Graves, plumbing. 3 45 

Dr. A. J. Bonneville, fumigating, 17 50 

Foster Bros., hardware, . 60 

John J. Betzhold, labor and supplies 15 40 

express, cartage etc., > 10 25 

John P. Chandler, wood, 3 50 

M. J. Ryan, supplies. 5 62 

L. A. Powers, wood and labor, 35 00 

Scott Harris, janitor, 46 00 
James Ormond, .. ... 36 00 

Charles Flynn, " 71 56 

Claud Hubbard, " 14 00 

John Salvas, and supplies, 86 20 

S. G. Hubbard, " 49 20 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, and cleaning, 65 50 

Louise Shea, 13 00 

Katherine Flynn, $ 00 

,,, John Merrick, " 2 50 

Mary J. Brown, sweeping, 5 75 



17 



Katherine W. Day, sweeping- 

Cornelia M. Wickles. 
Anna Levetre, 

Steve Vitula, transportation children, 
Dr. A. J. Bonneville, fumigating; school, 



$6,901 76 
SCHOOL STREET PERMANENT ROAD 



5 


75 


28 


50 


12 


00 


2 


00 


15 


00 



T. J. Ryan, labor, 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 

J. S. Bardwell, engineer, 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 

Harry Bardwell, 

M. J. Proulx, 

P. T. Boyle, 

J. C. Ryan, 

Howard & Smith, 

Mrs. C. Graves, 

Win. Boyle, 

Daniel Sheehan 

Alex Donnas, 

James Boyle, 

Steve Vitula 

Anthony Posket, labor 

L. Waltz, 

B. Bucrak, 

J. Gies, 

Robert Bardwell, 

H. Gould, 

Daniel Cahill, 

John Sheehan, 

John Merrick, 

Charles Wagner, 

E. B. Dickinson, sand 

John S. Lam & Sons, rock, 



$6 


00 


21 


00 


15 


00 


22 00 


31 


00 


6 


00 


2 


00 


22 


00 


28 


00 


19 


00 


22 00 


24 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


18 


00 


8 


00 


13 


13 


12 


75 


13 


12 


12 


25 


4 


37 


3 


50 


12 


24 


4 


37 


6 


75 


5 


00 


191 


52 



$535 00 



J8 



MAIN STREET SIDEWALK 



Barrett Mfg Co., tar anc 


L pitch, 




$240 27 


Boston & Main R. R., freight, 


27 35 


N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R 


., freight, 


6 48 


John S. Lane & Sons, rock, 


236 58 


City of Northampton, pitch and rock, 


15 96 


Wm. Mahar, rent of tools and labor, 


52 75 


A. L. Strong, wood, 




2 25 


T. J. Ryan, labor, 




109 50 


J. S. Bard well, team and labor, 


130 00 


James Mullens, 






23 00 


H. S. Shumway, 






62 00 


Howard & Smith, 






13 00 


Edward Ryan, 






20 00 


John Proulx, 






15 50 


David Billings, • 






22 00 


J. C. Ryan, 






60 00 


Mrs. Emma Webber, 






24 00 


John Day, 






10 00 


P. T. Boyle, 






4 00 


C. S. Shattuck, 






18 00 


Steve Vitula, 




t 


9 00 


Harry Bar dwell, 




6 00 


L. Waltz, labor, 


62 12 


J. Gies, 




57 75 


John Merrick, 




52 50 


John Sheehan. 




55 12 


B. Butrak, 




46 50 


Anthony Poskelt, 




42 87 


H. Gould, 




43 74 


Robert Bardwell, 




50 75 


Daniel Cahill, 




38 50 


P. Brennan, Jr., 




9 00 


Leonard Day, 




6 00 


Wm. Lyons, 




6 00 


Leroy Graves, 


'' 


9 00 


Frank Wilkie, 


i 




1 50 



1 


50 


3 


00 


40 


70 


$1,634 19 



19 



J. McHugh, labor, 

Harry Howard, team and labor, 

E. B. Dickinson, sand, 



SCHOOL STREET SIDEWALK. 

T. J. Ryan, labor, $3 00 

J. S. Bar dwell, team and labor, 

Harry Bardwell, 

H. Shumway, 

Robert Bardwell, labor, 

L. Waltz, 

John Sheehan 

John Merrick, 

J. Gies, 

Daniel Cahill, 

H. Gould, 

Anthony Poskett 

B, Butrak, 

$41 88 

STATE ROAD CONSTRUCTION. 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., fixture, 2 50 

American Express Co., 65 

Charles Miller and Sons Co., iron pipe. 32 53 

Wm. R. Winn, oil. 3 05 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight stone bounds, 5 75 

pipe and oil. 5 05 

Howard & Smith, coal, 28 38 

John S. Lane & Sons, trap rock, 1,571 76 

N. Y. N. & H. R. R. Co., demurage, 7 00 

A. L. Strong, posts and wood. 6 25 

Howard & Smith, coal, 5 60 

Merrick Lumber Co. lumber, 14 23 



4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


3 


50 


3 


50 


3 


50 


3 


50 


3 


50 


3 


50 


2 


63 


1 


75 


1 


50 



20 



T. J. Ryan, labor, 

Steve Yitula. team and labor. 

Alex Donnas, 

J»ames Bardwell, team, 

engineer, 
H. Shnmway, team and labor, 

Wm. Boyle, 
Daniel Sheen an, 
James Boyle, 
Howard & Smith. 
Samnel Osley, 
James Mullins, 
W. W. Goer, 
John Vollinger, 

A. L. Strong, 
J. M. Towne, 
W. Holden, 
L. Waltz, 
H. Gonld, 
Joseph Chandler, 
John Sheehan, 

John S. Lane & Sons, trap rock 
John Merrick, labor, 
J. Gies, 
Anthony Pochett, 

B. Bntrak, 
John Wilkes, 
Charles Wagner, 
Robert Bardwell, 
Daniel Cahill, 
Steve O. Master, 
George Steel, 
John Steel, ■* 



£102 


00 


16 


00 


16 


00 


i O 


25 


71 


88 


94 


00 


66 


00 


18 


00 


18 


00 


22 


00 


8 


00 


75 


35 


10 


00 


40 


25 


39 


35 


20 00 


25 


35 


46 


04 


39 


36 


23 


62 


47 


79 


120 


36 


29 


75 


38 


50 


10 


50 


21 


00 


t 


50 


9 


00 


45 


50 


15 


75 


6 


00 


4 


50 


2 


00 


82,865 35 



21 





DIGGING DITCH. 




T. J. Ryan, 


labor, 


$21 00 


James Bar dwell, 




16 00 


J. Gies, 




14 00 


John Sheehan, 




16 63 


L. Waltz, 




19 25 


Robert Bardwell, 




8 75 



MAKING DRAIN 



T. J. Ryan, 
Daniel Cahill, 
George Chandler, 
John Wilkes, 
Charles Wagner, 
Anthony Poskett, 
John Merrick, 
Leonard Day, 
H. Gould, 
Joseph Chandler, 



labor, 



$95 63 



$21 00 


9 


37 


3 


50 


5 


25 


3 


00 


3 


75 


2 


62 


3 


75 


5 


25 


8 


74 



$66 23 



GRAVEL SURFACEING 



T. J. Ryan, labor, 

James Bardwell, team and labor, 

H. Shumway, 

L. Waltz, labor, 

John Sheehan, 

J. Gies, 

Howard & Smith, coal, 

B. P. Dewight, sand, 

Wm. E. Boyle, " 



$3 00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


1 


75 


1 


75 


1 


75 


5 


85 


60 


36 


50 


70 



$133 16 



22 



SO. MAIN AND MAPLE ST. SEWER, 



Boston & Maine R. R., freight on pipe, 

David W. Lewis Co., sewer pipe, 

John Wilkes, labor, 

John Smither, 

Joseph Warrat, 

Stanley Kisyeryk, 

Stan Pudlosny, 

Joseph Kulusa, 

Joseph Rowoicki, 

G. Loskinwick, 

Bayzl Mickeytenk, 

John Lasrasier, 

Ignas Sequdox, 

Sebastin Gonchos, 

T. J. Ryan, 

L. Waltz, 

J. Sheehan, 

J. Gies, 

B. Butrak, 

Eddie Kempesti, 

H. Gould, 

Tony Poskett, 

Robert Bar dwell, 

J. S. Bardwell, 

James Mullins, 

J. McHugh, 

H. Shumway, 

John Day, 

W. A. Bailey, brick, 

Norwood Engineering Co., basins, 

Howard & Smith, cement, 

W. H. Riley & Co., 100 ft pipe, 



team and labor, 



$136 70 
230 52 

5 25 
7 50 

6 00 

12 00 

13 70 

15 75 

13 50 
1 25 

14 25 

11 25 

12 00 
1 25 

45 00 
24 50 
22 75 
14 00 
19 50 
19 50 

16 63 

4 50 
1 75 

10 00 

10 00 

6 00 

6 00 

5 00 
10 80 

13 23 

17 00 
36 10 



$762 98 



23 



REPAIRS ON SOUTH MAIN STREET SEWER 



team and labor 



labor 



T. J. Ryan, 
R-. F. Wells, 
H. Shumway, 
J. S. Bardwell, 
J. C. Ryan, 
M. J. Proulx, 
P. T. Boyle, 
Harry Bardwell, 
L. Waltz, 
John Sheehan, 
J. Gies, 
B. Butrak, 
H. Gould, 
E. Busher, 
John Merrick, 



REPAIRS NO. MAIN STREET SEWER 

T. J. Ryan, labor, 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 

M. J. Proulx, 

Edward Ryan, labor, 

L. Waltz, 



RESURFACING DEPOT ROAD 



$10 50 


2 


00 


8 


00 


6 


00 


5 


50 


4 


00 


8 


00 


7 


00 


1 


75 


7 


00 


7 


50 


1 


50 


1 


75 




75 


1 


75 



$73 00 



$3 00 


4 


00 


5 


50 


1 


50 


1 


75 



$15 75 



T. J. Ryan, labor, 

J, S. Bardwell, team and labor, 

engineer, 
H. Shumway, team and labor, 
D. P. McGrath, 
J. W. Kiley, 



$39 00 
26 37 

33 00 
44 00 
30 00 

34 00 



24 



L. Waltz, labor, 

John Sheen an, 

J. Gies, 

S. S. Dwight, sand, 

John S. Lane & Sons, rock, 

Howard & Smith, coal, 



FILL ON PLAIN 



T. J. Ryan, labor, 

J. S. Bardwell. team and labor, 

J. W. Kiley, 

H. S. Shumway, 

Howard & Smith, 

J.C.Ryan, 

John Karin, Jr., labor, 

L. Waltz, 

J. Gies, 

M. Spurber, 

John Sheehan, 

Robert Bardwell, 

Anthony Poskett, 

Peter Shnmiter, 



21 


50 


19 


25 


20 


12 


1 


70 


313 


72 


16 


98 



$599 64 



$ 9 


00 


12 


00 


8 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


8 


00 


4 


50 


5 


25 


4 


50 


4 


50 


4 


50 


3 


00 


4 


50 


4 


50 



$96 25 



REPAIRS ON BRIDGES 

PINK BRIDGE 

T. J. Ryan, labor, $6 00 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 
H. Shumway, 
L. Waltz, labor, 

'John Sheehan, 
H. Gould, 
J. Gies, 
John Merrick, 

$22 76 



1 


76 


1 


00 


3 


50 


3 


50 


1 


75 


1 


75 


3 


50 



25 



KINGSIyEYS BRIDGE 



S. W. Kingsley, 
John Merrick, 
H. Gould, 



labor, 



$5 00 
1 75 
1 75 

$8 50 



BRADSTREET BRIDGE 



John Merrick, labor, 
John Sheehan, 
B. Burak, 



$3 50 
3 50 
3 00 

$10 00 



DEPOT ROAD BRIDGE 

T. J. Ryan, labor, 

J. S. Bardwell, team and labor, 

Frederick Bardwell, team and labor, 



L. Waltz, 
H. Gould. 
J. Stockin, 
Wm. Fox, 
F. Bardwell, 



labor, 



$3 00 


8 


00 


5 


00 


1 


75 


1 


75 


1 


13 


1 


13 


3 


50 



$25 26 



DEPOT HILL 



T. J. Ryan, labor, 
J. S. Bardwell, 
H. Shumway, 
James Mullins, 
J. W. Kiley, 
Wm. Boyle, 
Daniel Sheehan, 
James Boyle, 
L. Waltz, 



team and labor, 



$6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
3 50 



26 

John Sheehan, Team and Labor 
J. Gies, 
J. Merrick, 
H. Gould, 



BOUNDARY STONES 



Carlton Crafts, labor, '06, 

George Chandler, " '07, 

Alfred Breor, " '07, 

J. C. Ryan, " '07, 



August Lombilla, plank, 

W. H. Riley & Co., akron pipe, 

T. J. Ryan, saw, 

Archie P. Graves, plank, 

Howard & Smith, cement, 

A. L. Strong, posts, 

George P. Graves, plank, 

Archie P. Graves, lumber and plank, 

E. B. Dickinson, sand, 

Merrick Lumber Co., plank, 

Foster Bros., tools and wire, 

Merrick Lumber Co., plank, 

Howard & Smith, tools, 

George Eberline, bolts and repairs, 

Norwood Engineering Co., 5 caps, 

M.J. Ryan, supplies, 



3 50 


3 50 


3 50 


3 50 



$79 50 



T. J. Ryan, labor, $3 00 

John Day, team and labor, 1 31 

L. Waltz, " 1 75 

John Sheehan, 1 75 



$7 81 



$7 


00 


7 


50 


6 


00 


8 


25 


$28 75 


; 76 


80 


1 


20 


1 


75 


175 


00 


4 


20 


10 


50 


34 


50 


177 


12 


10 


00 


146 


87 


20 


68 


96 


78 


8 


45 


2 


35 


1 


00 


23 


46 



27 



Q. P. Bartiets, stone bounds, 

Harry Bar dwell, plank, 

Oscar Belden & Sons, labor and material, 

A. L. Strong, gravel, 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight on machine, 

Black Mfg Co., road machine, 

George Eberline, repairs on tools, 

M. J. Ryan, supplies, 

J. M. Pierce, road signs, 

R. D. Graves, repairs on roller, 

L. H. Kingsley, sand, 

T. J, Ryan, labor, 

J. S. Bar dwell, team and labor, 

H. Shumway, 

Howard & Smith, 

J.C.Ryan, 

M. J. Proulx, 

James Boyle, 

Daniel Sheehan, 

P. T. Boyle, 

D. P. McGrath, 
James Mullins, 
R. F. Wells, 
John Day, 

L. Waltz, 

John Sheehan, labor, 

J. Gies, 

John Merrick, 

H.Gould, 

Robert Bar dwell, 

Steve O. Master, 

J. S. Denlein, 

B. Butrak, 
Anthony Poshett, 
David Laundry, 
Frank Vollinger, 

E. Bushe, 

E. W. &E. S. Field, 
John Breor. 



20 25 


11 


05 


17 


85 


15 


00 


1 


76 


15 


00 


1 


25 


5 


67 




75 




65 


33 


00 


242 


25 


234 


50 


248 


00 


73 


25 


2 


75 


34 


00 


12 


00 


10 


00 


6 


00 


4 00 


2 


00 


8 


00 


4 


00 


91 


89 


62 


82 


60 


12 


11 


63 


8 


50 


5 


25 


3 


00 


4 


50 


7 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 




75 


3 


05 


5 


50 



28 

J. McHugh, team and labor, 4 35 

John Denlein, " 3 50 

Howard & Smith, ." _ 1 50 

Carlton Crafts, " 3 00 



$2,075 00 

RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN 

State Aid Expenditures, $ 87 00 

Poor, 1,008 81 

Old Btlls, 552 00 

Memorial Building, 152 26 

Water Rates, 500 00 

Street Lighting, 891 66 

Tree Warden, 77 30 

Cemeteries, 100 00 

Bonds, Town Officers, 39 00 

Memorial Day, 75 00 

Public Library, 301 72 

Muster Day, 75 00 

Fire Department, 354 30 

Forest Fire Warden, 47 80 

Town Officers, 1,254 00 

School Inspection, 100 00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, 116 98 

Contingent, 838 91 

Smith Academy, 500 00 

Schools, 6.901 76 

Highway School Street, 535 00 

Main Street Sidewalk, 1, 634 19 

School " repairs, 41 88 

State Road Construction, 3,160 37 

Main and Maple Street Sewer. 762 98 

Repairs on South Main Street Sewer, 73 00 

North <l " " 15 75 

Resurfaceing Depot Road, 599 64 



29 



Fill on Plain, 

Labor on Bridges, 

Depot Hill, 

Boundary Stones, 

Highway Labor, '06 and '07, 

Ordinary Highway Expenditures, 



APPROPRIATIONS 



... 96 


25 


66 


52 


79 


50 


7 


81 


28 


75 


2,075 


00 


$23,150 


14 



Sealer's Outfit, 


$ 125 00 


Memorial Building, 


150 00 


Bonds for Town Officers, 


50 00 


Salaries for Town Officers, 


1,400 00 


Interest, 


400 00 


Town Debt — Note Depot Road, 


1,000 00 


Water Rates, 


500 00 


Highways and Bridges, 


2,500 00 


Support of Schools, 


5,400 00 


Memorial Day, 


75 00 


Firemen's Muster, 


75 00 


Fire Apparatus, 


200 00 


Public Library, 


300 00 


School Physicians, 


100 00 


Street Lighting, 


900 00 


Smtth Academy Tuition, 


500 00 


Sewer Extension, Main and Maple Streets, 


600 00 


Care of Cemeteries, 


100 00 


Cemetery, Removing Hedge, 


100 00 


Sewer, 1907— Assessed 1908, 


1,000 00 


On School Street, 


400 00 


Support of Poor, 


700 00 


Concrete Sidewalk, Main Street, 


700 00 


Contingencies, 


1,000 00 


Resurfaceing Stone Road, 


400 00 




$18,675 00 



30 

Appropriated by State, '08 work, $3,990 90 



JOHN McHUGH. JR., ) Selectmen 
T. J. RYAN, [ of 

C. EDWARD WARNER, ) Hatfield. 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Selectmen, and find them correct. 

E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 5, 1909. 



By-Laws submitted by the Selectmen for the acceptance 
of the Town of Hatfield, Mass* 



Section 1 — The constable or other person to whom a 
Warrant for a Town meeting is directed shall give notice of 
such meeting in the following manner, to wit: by posting 
attested copies thereof in three or more public places in said 
Town at least seven days before the day of said meeting. 

Section 2 — The Treasurer of the said Town shall give no 
note as Treasurer unless authorized by vote of the Town to 
borrow money, and under the certified approval of the Select- 
men. 

Section 3 — The Treasurer shall, before entering upon the 
duties of his office, give bonds for the faithful discharge of the 
said duties to the satisfaction of the Selectmen, which bond 
may be that of a surety company. 

Section 4 — The Town shall annually choose an Auditor, 
whose duty it shall be to audit the accounts of the Treasurer, 
Selectmen, Water and Sinking Fund Commissioners of the 
Town and report at its annual meeting. 

Section 5 — The Collector of Taxes shall, before entering 
upon the duties of his office, give a bond to the satisfaction of 
the Selectmen, which bond may be that of a surety company. 

Section 6 — The Highway Surveyor shall in addition to his 
ordinary duties as Surveyor have charge of all town property 
used in his department, and be responsible for the same. 

Section 7 — No person shall use any indecent, profane, or 
insulting language in any street or public place in the town, 
near any dwelling house or other building therein, or be or 
remain upon any sidewalk, public way, or way to any public 



32 

hall, or church, or upon any doorstep, portico or other pro- 
jection of any building, to the annoyance, disturbance or 
obstruction of any person lawfully entitled to pass or resort 
thereto . 

Section 8 — No person shall paint, put upon or in any 
manner affix to any tree, fence, pole, rock, building which is 
the property of another in any of the public places or ways of 
this Town any words, signs, placards or advertisements or 
posters without first obtaining the written consent of the owner 
of the said fence, tree, pole, rock or building. 

Section 9 — No person shall dig up, cut down, climb, 
break, peel, cut, deface or injure or destroy any ornamental 
or shade tree growing or being in any of the streets or high- 
ways or on any of the public grounds of the said Town without 
the consent of the Selectmen or persons having said grounds 
in charge first being obtained in writing. 

Section 10 — No person shall tie or fasten any horse, ox, 
mule or team of any kind to any ornamental or shade tree, 
shrub or vine or to any fence or other thing erected for the 
protection of such tree, vine or shrub in any street, highway 
or public places in the said town. 

Section 11 — No money of the town shall be paid out by 
the Tresurer except in settlement of bills properly approved by 
the Selectmen: provided however, that State and County 
taxes, the bonds and notes of the town, and interest thereon 
may be paid by the Treasurer without such approval. 

Section 12 — Any person intending to erect any dwelling 
house, stable, shop, store or other building, within the Town 
of Hatfield, shall, before proceeding to erect the same or lay 
the foundations thereof, give notice in writing to the Selectmen 
of such intention, and of the character and location of the 
proposed building. 

Section 13 — No person shall break or dig up the ground 
in any highway or street, or place thereon any wood, timber, 
stones, brick, or any ashes or cinders, rubbish, offal or filth, 



33 

or obstruction of any kind, or move any building into or along 
a highway or street, without a written license from the Select- 
men. And any person licensed as aforesaid who shall dig or 
break up the ground in any highway or street shall, before 
the expiration of his license, restore the same to the acceptance 
of the Selectmen. 

Section 14 — The School Committee shall have the care 
management and control of the school houses and school 
house grounds. 

Section 15— The Selectmen shall have the care, manage- 
ment and control of parks and squares, and all other real 
estate belonging to the town. They shall have the charge and 
inanagement of all suits and actions for and against the town, 
and may prosecute, defend or settle the same as they see fit, 
unless otherwise directed by vote of the town. 

Section 16 — No person shall own or keep in said town 
any dog which by barking, biting, howling, or in any other 
manner disturbs the quiet of any person. 

Section 17 — No persons shall be dealers in or keepers of 
shops for the purchase, sale or barter of junk, old metals or 
second hand articles, or go about collecting same in this town, 
unless they are duly licensed by the Selectmen in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 102, Sections 29 to 32 inclusive 
of the Revised Laws, as amended by Sections 1 to 1 inclusive 
of Chapter 187 of the Acts of 1902. 

Section 18 — The Selectmen may grant licenses to such 
persons and a record of the licenses so granted shall be kept 
by the Town Clerk. 

Section 19 — Hawkers and peddlers of fruits and vege- 
tables, who are not engaged in the pursuit of agriculture, 
shall be required to pay a license fee, fixed by the Selectmen, 
before being allowed to ply their-trade within the limits of the 
town , 



38 






CR. 


$5,740 95 
75 28 


$5,816 23 



By Uncollected taxes, 
By Interest on taxes, 



IN ACCOUNT WITH A. L. STRONG, COLLECTOR, 
1908 TAXES 

DR. 



To Cash received, 

Uncollected taxes, 

Assessors orders of Abatement, 

Discount on taxes, 



CR 



$14,368 06 

4,938 31 

10 13 

239 63 


$19,556 13 
$19,556 13 


$19,213 67 

301 55 

40 91 



By Assessors Warrant, 
Addition to Warrant, 
Interest Collected, 



WATER SINKING FUND 

DR. 

To 30 years 4 per cent Water Bonds, $50,000 00 

CR. 
By Sinking Fund, $13,315 27 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

DR. 

Northampton Inst. For Savings, note 

due May 27, $5,000 00 

Water Sinking Fund, demand note, 927 52 

$5,927 52 



39 

CR. 

fey Uncollected Taxes, $4,938 3i 

Due from State Aid, 87 00 

State, Inspection of Animals 30 00 
Conn Val St Ry, plank' g bridge 96 39 
City of Northampton, tuition 191 91 
Sidewalk Assessments, 1,021 27 

Sewer " 264 00 

Balance in Treasury, 1,540 41 



$8,169 29 



DR. 

OUTSTANDING LONG-TIME LOAN 

Jose, Parker & Co., Depot Road Account, $2,000 00 

L. H. KINGS LEY, Treasurer. 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Town Treasurer, and find them correct. 

E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor. 

Hatfield, Mass., March 5, 1909. 



36 



To cash rec 



'd from David Billings, sidewalk assessment 28 16 


Estate F. P. Pease, '• 


16 26 


" C. E. Wilkie, " 


46 62 


" Chloe Morton, " * 


15 94 


John F. Day, 


9 67 


Alpheus Cowles, 


43 49 


Cornelia A. Billings 


14 63 


F. H. Bardwell, 


18 81 


' ' . Estate H S Hubbard ' ' 


3 74 


First Parish, 


23 16 


Geo. A. Billings, 


47 81 


Roswell Billings, 


13 60 


H. L. Howard, 


13 60 


Sam'l K Billings, 


19 87 


H. E. Graves, 


6 00 


Geo. A. Billings, sewer 


33 00 


P.T.Boyle, 


33 00 


Edgar P. Lyman, 


33 00 


Mary E. Baggs, 


33 00 




$34,085 46 



TO CASH REC'D FROM TEMPORARY LOANS 

Northampton Inst, for Savings, 6 mo. 

Note, $5,000 00 

Northampton Inst, for Savings, 6 mo. 

Note, 5,000 00 

First National Bank, Northampton, 2 

mo. Note, , 1,983 33 $11,983 33 



$46,068 79 





37 ' 








CR. 






By cash paid Selectmen's orders, 




$23,150 14 




Interest on'Water Bonds, 




1,960 00 




District Court, fees and expenses, 


57 24 




Interest on temporary loans, 




269 29 




Interest on outstanding loans, 




113 33 




County tax, 




2,160 71 




State tax, 




2,420 00 




repairs highway, 




36 00 




Treas. Water Commissioners, 


sale 


of 




Water Bonds, 




2,000 00 


' 


Treasurer of Sinking Funds, 




861 67 


Balance 


i in Treasury, 




$1,540 41 



BY CASH PAID TEMPORARY AND OUTSTANDING 

LOANS. 

Jose, Parker & Co., note Depot road, $1,000 00 

Northampton Inst, for Savings, note 

6 mos., 3,500 00 

Northampton Inst, for Savings, note 

3 mos., 5,000 00 

First Nat'l Bank, Northampton, note 

2 mos., 2,000 00 11,500 00 



$46,068 79 

IN ACCOUNT WITH A. L. STRONG, COLLECTOR, 
1907 TAXES. 

DR. 



To Cash Received, $5,708 39 

To Assessors Orders of Abatements, 107 84 



$5,816 23 



34 

Section 20 — Any person convicted of violating or failing 
to comply with the provisions of the foregoing sections, or of 
acting contrary to the conditions of provisions of any license 
granted under the provisions of said sections, shall, be 
punished by a fine not exceeding Twenty Dollars ($20.00) 
for each offence. 



Treasurer's Report. 



L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in Account with the Town 
of Hatfield. 



DR, 



To balance 


in treasury, 


$456 99 


To cash rec'd from A. L. Strong, 1907 taxes, 


5,708 39 




1908 " 


14,368 06 




Treas Water Commissioners, 


3,200 00 




District Court, fines and fees, 


68 00 




Pool License, 


2 00 




Slaughtering Licenses, 


1 00 




Sale of two Water Bonds, 


2,000 00 




Refunding of Dog Fund, 


158 00 




Sale of tile, 


47 00 




Alex. Bimie, trap rock, 


3 64 




Rent of Town Hall, 


7 00 




M. H. Bowman, supplies sold, 


64 




State, tuition of children, 


5 50 




City of Boston, 


69 50 




Board of Charity, 


3 45 




Inspection of Animals, 


28 50 




for Supt. of Schools, 


462 96 




Corporation Tax, 


355 52 




National Bank Tax, 


1,060 79 




State Aid, 


104 00 




Repairs State Road, 


22 85 




Income Mass. School Fund, 868 81 




Mass State Highway Commission 4,586 50 




C. A. Bardwell, Whately, tuition 10 00 




City of Northampton, 


32 50 




Paul Hundras, cemetery plot, 


50 



Water Commissioners' Report. 



The following respectfully submitted as the thirteenth 
annual report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows: — 

Balance of cash from last year's account, 
Cash from collection of Water Rates, 
Town grant for Bridge St. extension, 
Sale of supplies and connections, 



3,931 


93 


2,000 


00 


45 


00 



1,059 44 



We have paid the past year as follows: — 

Town Treasurer, water rates, 
Bridge street extension of 1908, 
Gazette Printing Co., billheads, 
W. H. Riley & Co., supplies, 
Chapman Valve Mfg. Co., hydrant, 
Charles Millar & Son, pipe etc., 
Norwood Engineering Co., supplies, 
M.J. Ryan, setting hydrant, 
Repairs on tapping machine, 
R. D. Graves, labor, 
C. W. Wade, labor and cash paid 

collection of Water rates, 
Balance, cash on hand, 



There are now 317 connections with private property; 87 
hydrants for fire protection; 5 water tanks, water in five 
school houses and in Memorial Hall. 



$3,200 00 


1,529 


15 


4 


00 


85 


09 


21 


78 


39 


27 


26 


80 


22 


50 


13 


25 


3 


95 


80 


70 


117 


95 


915 


00 


$6,059 44 



4j 

There has been laid the past year 3,585 feet of 1 in. cast 
iron water main on Bridge street with three hydrants at a cost 
of $1,529.15. 

We would recommend that the extension of the pipe line 
from the house of Mr. James Welch to Clay hill, about 2,300 
feet, be laid the coming year at a cost of about $1,000, thus 
completing the circuit of water on the system north of School 
street. 

The total cost of the entire system to March 1, 1909 is 

$ 5* r Goa.*7 ' /-^Utf^.i u 

CHARLES L. WARNER, ) - Hatfield 
DANIEL W. WELLS, [ Water 

M. J. PROULX. ) Commissioners 



I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Board of Water Commissioners and find them 
correct. 

E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 3, 1909. 



46 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 



Joseph Asponwich, 
Bridget Breor, 
Irene Trudeau, 
Francis G. Bard well, 
Joseph Goncrousz, 
Mary E. Phelps, 
Martin Hundras, 
Henry Smith, 
Wladislaw Trojanowski, 
Gladyslawa Wesolowski, 
Henry Strong Hubbard, 
Patrick Boyle, 
Bridget Fit z Gibbon, 
Frank Dugal, 
Thomas Yarrows, 
George W. Waite. 



Mary FitzGerald, 
Kate Cowles, 
James F. Murphy, 
Eunice J. Morton, 
Mary Malinoski, 
Lucy D. Canon, 
Richard Baxter Abbott, 
Caroline Smith Graves, 
Stanislawa Trojanowski, 
Helen Wolfram, 
Eleazer F. Cooley. 
Richard A. Mullany, 
Edwin Brainard, 
Mary Jane Manchester, 
Frank Zurof , 



DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending 
November 30, 1908, with the receipts and settlements of the 
account with the County Treasurer, is as follows: — 



85 male dogs at $2.00 each, 
6 female dogs at $5.00 each, 



Less fees, 91 dogs at 20 cents each, 



$170 00 
30 00 






.$200 00 
18 20 



$181 80 



Paid to County Treasurer, 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Town Clerk, 



Assessors' Report. 



Value of assessed personal estate, $ 234,113 00 
• " real estate, 1,106,307 00 



Total value of assessed estate, 


$1,340,420 00 


Value of assessed buildings, $622,732 00 






land, 483,575 00 








$1,106,307 00 




Number male polls assessed, 




556 


Number of residents assessed on property, 




332 


All others, (corporations, etc.,) 




59 
391 


Number of non-residents assessed on property, 




4L 


All others, 




31 

72 


Number of persons assessed on property, 




428 


For poll tax only, 




287 
715 


Rate of total tax per $1,000.00, 




$13 50 


Number of horses assessed, (4 mules) 




459 


cows, 




293 


neat cattle, 




55 


swine, 




17 


fowls, 




1130 


dwelling houses, 




340 


acres of land, 




9,260 


State tax, $2,456 00 




County tax, 2,160 


71 




Town tax, 14,175 


00 




Overlayings, 421 


96 


$19,213 67 






Estimated bank and corporation tax, 




1,300 00 


Conn. Val. St. Ry. Co., excise tax, 




294 12 



44 

MARRIAGES FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 

1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 

• 

24 17 30 32 33 

DEATHS BY MONTHS 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

November, 

December, 



No. 


Males 


Females 


2 


2 





6 


2 


4 


1 





1 


3 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 





7 


3 


4 


3 


3 





4 


3 


1 


3 


2 


1 



33 



19 



14 



Under 1 year of age, 
Between 1 and 5 years, 
5 10 



10 
20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
70 
80 



20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
70 
80 
90 



No. 


Males 


Fern 


11 


7 


4 


4 


3 


1 















































4 


2 


2 


8 


3 


5 


2 


1 


1 


4 


3 


• 1 



33 19 

Age of oldest person deceased (male) 88 years. 



14 



45 

CAUSES OF DEATH 

Classified according to the nomenclature adopted by the 
State Board of Registration. 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES 

Facial Erycipelas, 1 

Diphtheria, 1 

Malarial Fever, 1 

Enteritis, 1 

Cholera— Infantum, 3 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES 

Cancer, 3 

Tuberculosis, 1 

Malnutrition, 1 

LOCAL DISEASES 

Paralysis, 3 

Nephritis, 1 

Pneumonia, 3 

Heart Disease, . 2 

Blood Poisoning, , 1 

Obstruction of Intestines, 1 

Meningitis, 1 

Diabetes, 1 

DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES 

Old age, 1 

Premature birth, 2 

Still born, 2 

VIOLENT DEATHS 

Exposure, 1 

Suicide by shooting, 1 

Fracture R. Femur, 1 

Total, 33 



Town Clerk's Report. 



The Vital Statistics for the Towu of Hatfield for the year 

I v are as ::'-".ows: — 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS 



January, 

February. 

March 

April. 

May. 

June. 

July 
August 

Se;;: ember. 
I ctober, 

November, 

Z ecem: e: 



No. 


Males 


Female: 


12 


- 


4 


10 


3 


i 


9 


6 


3 




3 


6 


5 


1 


1 


6 


3 


3 


5 


1 


4 


12 


5 


• 


12 


9 


3 


3 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


. 


4 


3 



Total. 92 49 

BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 



43 



Born in Canada, 

United States 
Poland, 

Germany. 
Hungary. 
Ireland. 



Father 


Mother 


1 


1 


27 


2^ 


54 


54 


4 


4 


5 


5 


1 






;,_ 



92 



43 

BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 

1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 



52 64 68 6; 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. 



No, 

January. 2 

March. 1 

April, 3 

May. 2 

June, 4 

July, l 

October, 5 

November, 2 

December. 1 



21 
First marriage of both parties. 21 

The oldest and youngest grooms were forty-three and 
and twenty years of age respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were thirty-two and 
eighteen years of age respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED 



Born in the United States, 
Poland, 
Germany, 
Hungary. 
Canada. 



Groom 


Bride 


11 


13 


7 


7 


1 





1 


1 


1 






21 21 



48 

Value of property exempt from taxation, Chapter 12, Section 
5, Revised Laws. 

Literary institutions, 69,010 00 

Church property, 27,000 00 



$96,010 00 

Respectfully submitted, 



JAMES L. DAY, ) Assessors 

EDSOk W. STRONG, r of 
L. H. KINGSLEY. ) Hatfield 



Report of Sinking Fund 
Commissioners 



We have the following amounts deposited to the credit of 


the Sinking -Fund. 






Northampton Institution for Savings, 


$ 850 93 


Nonotuck Savings^Bank, 




525 15 


Florence * 




1,216 70 


Easthampton 




390 63 


Haydenville, 




404 34 


Town of Hatfield, Water Bonds, 


4 per cent, 


2,000 00 


Boston|& Maine Railroad 


4 


3,000 00 


N Y, ■ N H & H R R Co., " 


4 


2,000 00 


Note 


5 


2,000 00 


Town of Hatfield, Note, 


4^ " 


927 52 




$13,315 27 



M. J. RYAN, ) Sinking 

E. S. WARNER, \ Fund 

ROBERT M. WOODS ) Commissioners 



I have this day examined the vouchers and securities of 
the Sinking Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

E. B. DICKINSON, Auditor, 

Hatfield, March 1, 1909. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THF 



Year Ending February 10, 1909 



52 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

John J. Betsold, Chairman, 1911. 

Lawrence A. Powers. Seceetary, 1910. 
Thaddens Graves, Jr., 1909. 

M. H. Bowman, Superintendent. 



Truant Officers 
S. W. Kingsley and A. L. Strong. 

Authorized to sign Certificates for children between the 
ages of 14 and 16, 

M. H. Bowman. 



School Census September 1, 1908 

No, of boys between the ages of 5 and 15, 132 

No. of girls " " 5 and 15, 128 



Total, 260 

No. of boys between the ages of 7 and 14, 95. 

No. of girls "' 7 and 14, 98 



Total. 193 

No. of male illiterate minors over 14 years of age, none. 
No. of female illiterate minors over 14 years of age. none. 



REPORT 



We have made the following repairs on our schoolhouses: 

We have put up moulding- in all our school rooms so that 
our teachers can hang the pictures they received from the 
book club and all others they may receive. Putting up these 
mouldings does away with driving spikes and nails in the 
walls and breaking the walls. 

We have also changed all out doors on our school-houses 
to swing out instead of in, so it will be a very easy matter to 
push the doors open in case of fire or emergency. 

We also have laid a new hallway floor at the Hill School 
and a new entrance floor, also had the chimneys relaid at the 
Hill. 

At West Hatfield we had the schoolhouse painted and 
built on a new entrance 12x6, and steps all around, which 
makes a very great improvement to the building. 

At West Brook we also laid a new entrance floor, and at 
Bradstreet, we laid a new entrance floor and repaired some 
windows and put in some new ones overhead. We also ap- 
plied No-dusto on all our school floors, with good results. 

We put in one new furnace at Bradstreet, with good re- 
sults. 

We have had all our school buildings thoroughly cleaned 
at the beginning of each term, and swept 3 times a week, so 
we have all our school buildings in pretty good shape at the 
present time. 



54 




SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 


- 


RESOURCES 




Town appropriation, 


$5,400 00 


Dog Fund, 


158 00 


Income State School Fund, 


868 81 


State, — Supt., 


462 96 


City of Northampton, Tuition, 


191 91 


C. A. Bardwell, Tuition, 


10 00 


City of Boston, 


69 50 




$7,161 18 


Ordern drawn on Treasury, 


$6,901 76 



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Superintendent's Report. 



To the School Committee of Hatfield : 

I hereby submit for your consideration my fourth annual 
report of the schools of Hatfield for the year ending January 
31, 1908. It contains the reports of the Supervisors of Music 
and Drawing and the usual statistics. 

It is gratifying to record that less sickness has occurred 
among school children than during the previous year. This 
has been an aid to successful school work. Yet considerable 
absence has occurred, especially in some of the primary 
schools. It is a source of regret that too many parents con- 
sider attendance upon a primary school less important than 
attendance upon a grammar school. Apparently it is forgot- 
ten that absence affects the progress of a primary pupil even 
more than it does the grammar school pupil. This is very ap- 
parent when it is recalled that the primary pupil gets all his 
instruction in school and is too young to take work home: 
while the pupil in higher grades can easily catch up by eve- 
ning work. If pupils are very frequently absent from school 
they are very apt to get so far behind their classes that they 
cannot be coached up and must be among the number not 
promoted at end of year. 

Only three teachers resigned during the year and their 
places have been filled by those doing satisfactory work. 

A ninth grade has been established at the West grammar 
school thus placing that school on the same basis as the West- 
brook. 

From the Center grammar a class of three were graduated. 
This is in strong contrast with the very large class that were 
graduated the year previous. However the present ninth grade 
is larger, and about average size. 



59 

During; the fall term three pupils from the ninth grade at 
Westbrook and one from Smith Academy entered Smith Agri- 
cultural School at Northampton. This is a new factor in our 
educational problem and one that decreases the number of our 
grammar school graduates and lessens the class that would 
take a high school course. It also imposes an additional tax 
on the town for tuition. This year the sum asked for will be 
$400, one half of which will be returned by the state providing 
Chapter 572, Section 4 of Acts of 1908, is declared constitu- 
tional. 

This paragraph will serve to indicate the number of child- 
ren between the ages or five and fifteen years In the town of 
Hatfield for the fifteen preceding years : 

1893 (238), 1894 (256), 1895 (212), 1896 (204), 1897 

(225), 1898 (233), 1899 (242), 1900 (223), 1901 (218), 1902 

(220), 1904 (233), 1905 (228), 1906 (254), 1907 (264), 1908 
(260). 

In conclusion I desire to express my appreciation of the 
cordial support given me by the School Committee, teachers 
and citizens of the town of Hatfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MORTIMER H. BOWMAN. 



Report of the Supervisor of Drawing* 



Mr. M. H. Bow?nan, Superintendent of Schools : 

It is impossible in the district schools to give in a single 
year work that is best adapted to individual grades. There- 
fore I have made it my object to take up especially such bran- 
ches as seem essential, but in which the schools may be least 
proficient. I have also tried to vary the program by present- 
ing in new terms, yet comprehensive, some of the fundamen- 
tal principles which of necessity are repeated from year to 
year. 

The plan seems to have been successful as the results are 
satisfactory, and interest on the part of the children is not 
lacking. 

Thanks is due the teachers who have so heartily given 
their co-operation, and to the superintendent whose support I 
gratefully acknowledge. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LUCILE GRAVESTEIN, 

Supervisor of Drawing. 
Hatfield, January 25, 1909. 



Report of the Supervisor of Music. 



Mr. M. H. Bowman, Superintendent of Schools : 

Dear Sir. — The work in this department has been con- 
ducted along- the same general lines as in preceding years: the 
main divisions of the work being: song work, individual work 
sight singing and theory. 

There has been marked improvement along these lines 
and the work of both pupils and teachers is very satisfactory. 

Respectfully submitted^ 

CHRISTINE A. REECE, 

Supervisor of Music. 
Hatfield, Mass. 



Report of the School Physicians* 



To the School Committee of Hatfield : 

Clear distinction must be made between medical inspec- 
tion solely for the detection of communicable disease and that 
physical examination which aims to discover defects, diseases 
and physical condition. 

The one relates primarily to the immediate protection of 
the community, while the other looks to securing- and main- 
taining the health and vitality of the individual. 

Your School Physicians find that certain defects in in 1 
dividuals bear some relation to susceptibility to contagion, and 
that with improvement in condition, individual immunity may 
be increased. 

To reap the benefits of examination involves the constant 
attention willingly given by the teachers with reference to 
seating the deaf where they can hear best, and those having 
poor vision where they can see best, as well as constant co- 
operation with the parents. 

In this relation, it is requested that more attention be 
given to reports of physical defects in pupils, when such re- 
ports are sent to parents by the teachers. 

Seventy-five (75) per cent, of the children have complied 
with the law in regard to vaccination; in no case has the re- 
sult been other than satisfactory. 

A. J. BONNEVILLE, 
CHAS. A. BYRNE- 
February 17, 1909, 



63 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 



April 5, 


1909. 


Schools opens. 




April 19, 


1909. 


Patriots' Day, holiday. 




May 28, 


1909. 


Patriotic exercises. 




May 31, 


1909. 


Memorial Day, holiday. 




June 18, 


1909. 


Schools close. 




Sept. 1, 


1909. 


Schools open. 




Nov. 24-28, 1909. Thanksgiving recess. 




Dee. 17, 


1909. 


Schools close. 




Jan. 3, 


1910. 


Schools open. 




Feb. 21, 


1910. 


Patriotic exercises. 




Feb. 22, 


1910. 


Washington's Birthday, 


holiday. 


Mar. 11, 


1910. 


Schools close. 




April 4, 


1910. 


Schools open. 




Apr. 19, 


1910. 


Patriots' Day, holiday. 




May 27, 


1910. 


Patriotic exercises. 




May 30, 


1910. 


Memorial Day, holiday. 




June 17, 


1910. 


Schools close. 





RESIGNATIONS AND TRANSFERS. 

Center Grammar. Helen I. Sadler, transferred to West Gram- 
mar, resigned. 

Center Primary. Florence I. McMullen, transferred to West 
Primary, resigned. 

West Grammar. Mary J. Mnlcahey, transferred to Center 
Grammar. 

West Primary. Sarah V. Kiley, transferred to Center Pri- 
mary, 

Bradstreet. Julia E. Mellor, resigned. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



-OF THE- 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 




TOWN OF HATFIELD 



YEAR ENDING MARCH 1, 1910 



HERALD JOB PRINT, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Articles in the Warrant for Town Meeting, 
March 21, 19 10. 



Article 1 — To choose a Moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Article 2 — To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; one Assessor 
for 3 years; Town Treasurer; one School Committee for 3 
years; one Water Commissioner for 3 years; one Sinking Fund 
Commissioner for 3 years; and one for 1 year, (vacancy); one 
Trustee for Public Library for 3 years, and one for 1 year, 
(vacancy); Auditor; Tree Warden; Elector under the will of 
Oliver Smith: Tax Collector; six Constables; and to vote on 
the question — "Yes" or "No" — Shall Licenses be granted for 
the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town? All the fore- 
going to be voted for on one ballot. 

Article 3 — To hear the reports of the various rown officers 
and act thereon. 

Article 4 — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5 — To take action in relation to maintenance and 
repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing year. 

Article 6 — To take action in relation to raising money to 
defray the necessary expenses of the town for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 7 — To see what action the town will take in rela- 
tion to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Article 8 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Memorial Day. 



Article 9 — To take action in relation to the support of the 
poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appropriate money 
for same. 

Article 10 — To see if the town will appoint a committee 
of three (3), with power to act with similar Committees, 
which may be appointed by other towns, to select a suitable 
place for the co-operative care of the poor, and arrange terms 
and conditions for the use of the same, or act or do anything 
in reference thereto. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will vote under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 422, of the Acts of 1908, not to receive the 
Public Documents Series distributed by the Commonwealth. 

Article 12 — To revise and accept the list of Jurors reported 
by the Selectmen. 

Article 13 — To see if the town will raise, and appropriate 
money for the care of cemeteries for the ensuing year. 

Article 14 — To see if the town will employ a teacher of 
music in the public schools for the ensuing year, and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 15 — To see if the town will employ a teacher of 
drawing in the public schools for the ensuing year, and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 16 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 

Article 17 — To see if the town will appropriate money for 
the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children in Smith Academy, 
who are of suitable age and attainments to attend High 
School. 

Article 18 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 19 — To see if the town will authorize the Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow, during the cur- 
rent municipal year, beginning March 1, 1910, in anticipation 



of the taxes for said municipal year, such sums of money as 
may be necessary for the current expenses of the town, giving 
the notes of the town therefor, payable within one year from 
the dates thereof. 

Article 20 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the employment of one or more School Physicians, 
in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906 

Article 21 — To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield chil- 
dren attending the Industrial School at Northampton. 

Article 22 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for purchasing any supplies or apparatus 
needed by the Fire Department. 

Article 23 — To see if the town will vote to build a Sewer 
from the main on Main St., running west on School St., 800 
ft., and raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 24 — To see if the town will vote to extend its 
Sewer system on Elm St., south-westerly, 1500 ft., and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 25 — To see if the town will vote to build permanent 
roads of stone or other material, on Main and Elm Streets, 
and raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 26 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for lighting the public streets the ensuing year. 

Article 27 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for lighting, by electricity, Chestnut and 
North Prospect Sts., and certain parts of West Brook. 

Article 28 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for building sidewalks as follows: — on North 
street, from C. S. Shattuck's corner to junction of King and 
North sts., of gravel, part of the distance on South side and 
part on East side. A gravel walk on West side of Main St., 
from Thomas Dea's house — line north to Shattuck's Corner. 



A concrete walk on Elm street, on North side from V. 
Parader's house West 450 feet. All the above abutters to pay 
one-half the cost. 

Article 29 — To see if the town will authorize the Select- 
men to contract with the Mass. Highway Commission, ac- 
cording to the provisions of Section 10, Chapter 47, R. L., to 
construct a section of State Highway to be built in Hatfield 
this year. 

Article 30 — To see if the town will authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, or a majority 
thereof, to borrow a sum of money, not exceeding $10,000.00, 
to construct said highway; said loan to be paid out of the 
money paid the town by the State Highway Commission for 
constructing said road. 

Article 31 — To see if the town will vote to rescind the 
vote passed last spring accepting a set of By-Laws. 

Article 32 — To see if the town will vote to appoint a 
Committee for getting up a set of By-Laws to be submitted to 
the Attorney-General for his approval, and to be afterwards 
accepted by the town at some future meeting. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 

APPOINTED AT THE 

Convention of the Overseers of the Poor 

OF HAMPSHIRE COUNTY 

HEI.D in Northampton, November 26, 1909. 



Read and accepted at the Meeting of the Overseers of the Poor, in War 9, 

fan. 29, 1910. 

Your Committee appointed November 26, 1909, to investi- 
gate and report upon the advisability of operating joint Alms- 
houses in the county of Hampshire, wish to report that, after 
consideration and such investigation as was possible, your 
Committee wish to place themselves on record as follows: — 

We recommend two Almshouses, one at Northampton, the 
other at Ware, and that the towns in the vicinity of each 
Almshouse form an association for the conduct and main- 
tenance of said house. 

PREAMBLE AND BY-LAWS OF THE POOR FARM 
ASSOCIATION. 

We, the Subscribers, representing the towns of 

chosen in an article in a warrant 
for a town meeting in our respective towns held in March, 
1910, reading substantially as follows: — 



"To see if the town will choose a Committee of three (3), 
with power to act with similar Committees, which may be 
appointed by other towns, to select a suitable place for the co- 
operative care of the poor, and arrange terms and conditions 
for the use of the same, or act or do anything in reference 
thereto." 

By virtue of the authority vested in us by our respective 
towns at the meeting aforesaid, to earn* out the intent of our 
said towns, we do hereby form ourselves into an Association 
for the purpose of caring for the poor of our respective towns, 
to be known as The Farm 

Association. 

Article 1. The Association shall be formed for the period 
of three .3 years, with the privilege of three .3 years more. 

Article 2. The poor of all towns interested, requiring 
full support shall be maintained at the place selected when 
requested by the Overseers of the Poor of their several towns. 

Article 3. The expense of maintaining the poor at these 
places shall be divided among the respective towns, according 
to the number of week's board furnished the poor belonging 
to that town. 

Article 4. In case of death, the Warden shall notify, at 
once, the town to which the deceased person belongs, which 
shall care for and bury said person at its expense. 

Article 5. The board of management under this agree- 
ment shall employ a suitable physician to attend and care for 
all paupers committed to such Farm when sick, and the ex- 
pense thereof, including all needed medicines shall be charged 
as items :: ex~:e::-e fcc ~uch said Association. 

ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT 

between the town of . by its Committee 

and the Poor Farm Association 



The town of , by its Committee, chosen and 

authorized by a vote of the town at a legal meeting held 
March, 1910, hereby agree to furnish the real estate known as 
the Poor Farm, with the personal property con- 

nected therewith, to the Poor Farm Association on the follow- 
ing terms and conditions: — 

Article 1. The Association shall carry on farming after 
he manner of good husbandry, spending the hay and fodder 
grown on the place. 

Article 2. The Association shall pay the town of 

the sum of hundred dollars per year, for the 

term of three (3) years from , with the privilege of 

three (3) years more, as rent for the real estate. 

Article 3. The town of shall make all necessary 

repairs, alterations and additions, at their expense, to accom- 
modate thirty (30) paupers, or more. 

Article 4. The personal property shall be taken at the 
appraisal of three (3) disinterested Assessors. 

Article 5. The personal property shall be appraised by 
three (3) disinterested men, consisting of the Chairman of the 
Board of Assessors of the towns of and 

and , or by some member of these boards at the 

end of three (3) years. Any deficiency in the valuation at the 
close, compared with the previous valuation shall be deemed 
an expense of the Association, and any excess in the second 
valuation over the first shall be credited to the Association in 
settlement with the town of 

Article 6. The Association shall pay 6 per cent per year 
to for the use of the personal property reckoned 

upon the first appraisal. 

Article 7. The salary and expenses of the board of 
management shall be paid by the town they represent. 



JO 

Article 8. The sums above mentioned shall be in full 
satisfaction for the use of said property, and this writing and 
nature of contract shall be binding upon all parties when 
signed by the Committee authorized to do so by a vote of their 
respective towns. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. D. GIRARD, 

F. E. LYMAN, )- Committee 

W. E. SHANNON, 



Selectmen's Report. 



To the Citizens of Hatfield, Mass. : 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the requirements of 
the Public Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for 
the year ending March 1st, 1910, is respectfully submitted. 

Notwithstanding that the Assessors, inform us that the 
valuation will probably be increased by the taxation of 
tobacco this year, the old rule is still good as ever, — That by 
cutting down on the appropriations by the voters, the tax-rate 
will be lowered. 

STATE AID 

Sarah W. Bardwell $48.00 

Charles R. Crafts 24.00 



$72.00 



POOR EXPENDITURES 

City of Northampton, support of Christina Winzel $112.00 

Pre w family 88.93 

Gendron family 83.12 

aid Arthur Heon 9.30 

clothes for Kelvey family 13.15 

C. N. Clark, rent for Gendron family 72.00 

M.J. Ryan, supplies for Shea family 120.05 

J. H. Howard, " " " " 198 22 

Edward Proulx, rent " *' " 120.00 

Howard & Smith, wood and coal for Shea family, 20.75 

Louise Shea, supplies, . 15.00 



J2 

Mrs. F. T. Vining, rent, $ 12.00 

M.J. Ryan, supplies for M. O'Neil, 53.75 

Howard & Smith, wood and coal for M. O'Neil 10.25 

B. & M. R. R., rent for Demroi family 19.50 

Dickinson Hospital, care Stella Soszilla 23.00 

City of Holyoke, burial of Eddie Talar 8-00 

A. J. Bonneville, med. care John Sogasta 8.00 

Joseph Abramzek 17.00 

L. J. Pellessier, meat, Thomas Abramzek 16.24 

Howard, supplies, 3.02 

Byrne, med. care Shea family 26.00 

Demroi family 6.00 

" " H. P. Tisdale 8.00 

11 John Sharock 3.00 

" Mrs. John Sosilla 15.00 



J. H 
C. A 



OLD BILLS 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 



LAFRENIER CASE 



$1,081.29 



S. W. Kingsley, police duty $19.25 

F. G. Bardwell, Est., wood for schools 19.00 



$38.25 



A, J. Bonneville, school inspection, 1908, $50.00 

Chas. A. Byrne, " " 50.00 



$100.00 



O'Donnell & O'Donnell, law and expenses $168.22 

Wm. H. Belden, witness 4.50 

Robt. L. Belden, 4.50 

R.W.Weber. " 4.50 

John Hafey, " 4.50 



13 



Expenses, 


< 


( 




$ 7.50 


John J . Breor, 


< 


i 




4.50 


A. J. Bonneville, 




< i 




25.00 


E. W- Brown, 




i i 




25.00 


E. E. Davis, plans, 








27.96 




$276.18 


TOWN 


■ OFFICERS 






John McHugh, Jr., 


services as Selectman, 


1908 


$150.00 


Thos. J. Ryan, 




l (. i n 


1908 


75.00 


C. Edward Warner, 




i ( ( C ( 


1908 


75.00 


Daniel W. Wells, 




Water Commissioner 10.00 


C. L. Warner, 




i << i 


< 


io;oo 


M. J. Proulx, 




i c < < 


( 


10.00 


Oscar E. Belding, 




Ballot Clerk 




4.00 


Archie P. Graves, 




' " " 




2.00 


Larkin M. Proulx, 




( c < i < 




4.00 


John C. Ryan, 




' " " 




2,00 


Harry E. Graves, 




( i i 1 1 




2.00 


John F. Day, 




t (i i « 




4.00 


Thaddeus Graves, Jr., 




< u a 


• 


2,00 


Alfred H. Breor, 




i l ( ( c 




2.00 


E. B. Dickinson, 




* Auditor 




5.00 


M.J. Proulx, 




Constable 




22.00 


Edson W. Strong, 




Assessor 




90.00 


L. H. Kingsley, 




i < i 




121.25 


Wm. H. Belden, 




i i i 




60.00 


Alvin L. Strong, 




Tax Collectoi 


•, 1908 


200.00 


L. A. Powers, 




School Committee 


20.00 


Thaddeus Graves, Jr., 




i . i ( < 




20.00 


< < < ( 




< (( C ( 


190£ 


; io.oo 


John J. Betsold, 




i it a 




15.00 


L. H. Kingsley, 




Town Clerk 




300.00 


c< < < (< 




Treasurer 




100.00 


t ( ( ( c< 




Registrar of Voters 


8.00 


Thos. W. Ryan, 




i Hit 


t i 


8.00 


Saml. F. Billings, 




( ( ( ( ( 


i i 


8.00 




$1,349.25 



14 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

H. W. Marsh, storing hose wagon $ 5.00 

H. W. Wolfram, attending fires 5.00 

Boston Woven Hose Co., hose 240.00 

Adam B. Wolfram, chimney fire 2.00 

John Karen, fighting fire 2.00 

F. G. Howard, freight and express 3.31 

G. C. Fisk, supplies 56.75 
John M. Strong, fighting forest fires 4.00 
C. H. Crafts, storing hose wagon 5.00 
John J. Betsold, stor. h. wagon, hose, harness, horse 10.00 
Thomas Dea, storing hose wagon 5.00 
John McHugh, Jr., horse 2.00 
Fred Wenzel, storing wagon, labor, hose 9.00 
Geo. H. Newman, labor 3.00 
Whalen Bros., horse 6.00 

$358.06 
. CEMETERY APPROPRIATION 

F. H. Bardwell, Treas., $100.00 

SMITH ACADEMY 

Trustees Smith Academy, tuition $500.00 

HARDENING COFFEY ROAD 



James S. Bardwell, 
H. Shumway> 
C. H. Crafts, 
Steve Vochula, 
'George M. Donelson, 
John C. Ryan, 
Frank Kousinkoski, 
John W. Kiley, 
Daniel P. Sheehan, 



team and labor 


$16.25 


i < i i it 


20.00 


a ( ( < ( 


14.00 


c ( a a 


15.00 


( ( a a 


10.00 


t < ( ( 1 1 


10.00 


( c ( ( ( ( 


6.00 


( ( C ( ( ( 


4.00 


C ( ( ( ( f 


4.00 



15 



Thos. J. Ryan, 
L. B. Waltz, 
J. L. Sheehan, 
Jacob Geis 
John Merrick, 
John Fusek, 
Ignace Sadoski, 
Steve Hurley, 
George P. Graves, 
Edw. N. Dickinson, 



gravel 



$ 21.00 
8.75 
8.75 
6.13 
6.13 
1.50 
3.00 
1.50 
3.50 
13.00 

$172.51 



FILL ON PLAIN 



Daniel P. Sheehan, team and labor $20 00 


John C. Ryan, 


18 00 


James L. Boyle, 


10 00 


James S. Bardwell, 


16 00 


Wm. W. Langdon, 


10 00 


H. Shumway, 


16 00 


L. B. Waltz, 


9 62 


John L. Sheehan, 


9 62 


John Merrick, 


8 75 


Michael Spurber, 


3 75 


Thos. Wickles, 


5 25 


John Karen, Jr., 


5 25 


John Winzel, 


3 75 


Jacob Jandenski, 


5 25 


Wm. S. Murphy, 


5 25 


L. H. Kingsley, sand 


21 25 


John Karen, 


20 05 



$187 79 



TREE WARDEN 



M.J. Ryan, 
Ham J. Kelvey, 



axe 
labor 



1 00 

22 95 



J6 



John Sklosdoski, 


1 1 


$ 2 62 


D. L. Fitzgerald, 


i i 


13 11 


P. J. Whalen, 


i i 


40 40 


Henry LaMountain, 


i i 


2 20 


Wm, P. Boyle, 


i i 


1 75 


John Deinlein, 


i i 


11 00 


F. G. Vollinger, rep 


airs on carriage, 


5 00 




$100 03 




STATE ROAD 




James S. Bardwell, 


team and labor 


$ 237 25 


H. Shumway, 


( ( U ( ( 


150 00 


John C. Ryan, 


a a ( < 


74 00 


Whalen Bros., 


i < c < i < 


14 00 


John B. Vollinger, 


U i l ( ( 


41 00 


Joseph S. Newman, 


t < t < a 


135 00 


John M. Strong, 


a t < ( c 


134 00 


Fred T. Bardwell, 


(l 4 1 (< 


115 50 


Wm. E. Boyle, 


a a a 


111 00 


Howard & Smith, 


< < it ( < 


110 00 


Steve Vochula, 


( ( U l < 


101 50 


Patrick W. Mullins, 


< ( n ( i 


72 00 


Panl Balise, 


i ( ( < ( ( 


69 00 


D. P. McGrath, 


a ( ( ( < 


70 00 


T. J. Ryan, 


labor 


153 00 


L: B. Waltz, 




78 75 


J. L. Sheehan, 




80 50 


John Merrick 




78 75 


P. J. Deinlein, 




55 13 


John Vochula, 




19 50 


John Fusek, 




24 50 


John Urek, 




45 00 


F. L. Betsold, 


< < 


29 18 


George Olsin, 




3 00 


Wm. S. Murphy, 




8 75 


Bazyli Buchak, 




22 50 



M 



Michael Kowaisky, " 




$ 39 00 


Charles Carson, 




12 00 


John Tonisky, 




8 25 


Tony Bodise, " 




8 25 


Howard & Smith, coal 




56 57 


W. A. Clark Coal Co., 




12 98 


Mass. Broken Stone Co., 


crushed stone 


184 71 


John S. Lane & Sons, 


it t < 


2,782 50 


N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., 


demurrage 


15 00 


Expenses in buying 




4 50 


B. & M. R. R., freight on stone bounds 


4 20 


Charles Millar's Sons, iron pipe 


80 70 


W. H. Riley, packing for steam roller 


1 56 


P. McCarthy, coal 




20 36 


Wm. Fisher, labor 




2"25 


Geo. Eberlein, blacksmithing 




5 65 


John L. Boyle, sand 




25 80 




$5,421 22 


Received from State 




$6,452 31 



PERMANENT ROAD— MAIN AND ELM STREETS 



City of Northampton, crushed stone, 

John S. Lane & Sons, 

E. B. Dickinson, sand, 

Henry LaMountain, sand, 

E. E. Davis, plans and surveying, 



J. S. Bardwell, 
H. Shumway, 
H. E. Bardwell, 
John C. Ryan, 
F. H. Bardwell, 
Daniel P. Sheehan, 
M. W. Boyle, 
Geo. A. Billings, 
Ernest Godin, 



team and labor, 



$574 95 

220 02 

31 40 

4 70 

26 92 

176 50 

136 00 

42 00 

75 00 

9 00 

7 00 

7 00 

7 00 

19 00 



18 



David Billings, 
P. T. Boyle, 
D. W. Wells, 
A. W. Morton, 
James L. Boyle, 
John W. Kiley, 
Whalen Bros., 
Wm, E. Boyle, 
Howard & Smith, 
T. J. Ryan, 
L. B. Waltz, 
J. L. Sheehan, 
John Merrick, 
Jacob Geis, 
Bazyli Bachak, 
John Fusek, 
Geo. Chandler, 
John Borowski, 
Eddie Kampiste, 
Tony Penkosky, 
Stanley Glosky, 



20 00 



4 


00 


7 


00 


9 


00 


3 


00 


4 


00 


32 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


139 


50 


70 


89 


63 


89 


47 


26 


14 


00 


7 


13 


20 


63 


7 


00 


2 


63 


3 


38 


2 


63 


2 


63 



$1,816 06 



CRONIN'S HILL 



Geo. B. McClellan, 


gravel, 


$ 4 00 


J. S. Bardwell, 


team and labor, 


10 00 


H. Shumway, 


(< <( 


12 00 


H. E. Bardwell, 


<( (< 


4 00 


T. J. Ryan, 


i < 


9 00 


L. B. Waltz, 


t < 


5 25 


J. L. Sheehan, 


( < 


5 25 


Jacob Geis, 


i . 


5 25 


John Merrick, 


1 1 


5 25 


Ed. J. McGrath, 


i i 


3 50 



$63 75 



19 



^EWERS— MAIN, ELM AND NORTH MAIN STREETS 



David W. Lewis Co., sewer pipe, $481 20 


B. & M. R. R. freight on 


372 


32 


Brownell & Dickinson, 


33 


38 


A. L. Smith, brick, 


40 


60 


E. E. Davis, plans and surveying 


66 


44 


John L. Mather, labor, 


33 


03 


H. S. Hubbard Est, brick, 


3 


00 


Nor. Eng. Co., catch basins and covers, 56 


00 


Hatfield Water Works, connecting main, 8 


56 


B. M. Warner, sewer rights, 


50 


00 


J. A. Sullivan, cement, 


28 


25 


J. S- Bardwell, team and labor, 75 


50 


John C. Ryan, 


10 00 


Daniel P. Sheehan, " 


20 


00 


James L. Boyle, 


10 


00 


H. Shumway, 


3 


00 


T. J. Ryan, 


87 


00 


L. B. Waltz, 


53 


38 


J. L- Sheehan, 


37 


63 


Wm. S. Murphy, 


35 


87 


Bazyli Bachak, 


27 


60 


Jacob Geis, 


43 


74 


Ham. J. Kelvey, 


6 


00 


T. J. McGrath, 


4 


50 


Ed. J. McGrath, 


32 


56 


Peter Zagrodnek, 


9 


15 


John Merrick, 


32 


56 


Thos. Wickles, 


18 


90 


Cash, Polish 


299 05 


R. D. Graves, 


2 


63 






$1,981 84 


Rec'd from Sewer Assessment and 


. sale of tile, 


$819 46 



20 



IRON BRIDGES— COW, STRONG'S & CRONIN'S HILL 



United Construction 


Co. three iron 


Dridge 


s $180 00 


W. N. Potter's Sons, 


cement, 


63 70 


J. S. Bardwell, 


team and labor, 


42 00 


H. Shumway, 


i i i 




23 33 


Ernest Godin, 


i < < 




16 00 


Howard & Smith, 


i < i 




14 00 


John C. Ryan, 


i i i 




14 00 


T. J. Ryan, 






39 00 


J. L. Sheehan, 






22 75 


L. B. Waltz, 






22 75 


Jacob Geis, 






22 75 


John Merrick, 






19 25 


Ed. J. McGrath, 






12 26 


George Matuska, 






4 50 


Bazyli Bachak, 






3 75 



$500 03 



CONTINGENCIES 



A. J. Bonneville, fumigating, 

medical care W. S. 

returning births, 
Chas. A. Byrne, fumigating, 
Chas. A. Byrne, returning births, 
Herald Job Print, printing town reports, 
E. L. Graves, postage 
Scott Harris, care town clock, 
L. Vollinger, repairing clock, 
Hampshire County, filing By-laws, 
Metcalf & Co., election ballots, 
W. & L. E. Gurley, die and labels, 
Gas, town hall, 
Buffalo Steam Roller Co. repairs steam roller, 32 20 
Hobbs & Warren, license blanks, 3 00 



$12 


00 


Murphy, 10 


00 


4 


75 


60 


00 


10 


00 


ports, 86 


50 


6 


32 


10 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


13 


50 


3 


10 


1 


46 



21 



Wm. H. Feiker, law, $ 10 00 

Wright & Potter, intention of marriage book 2 50 
H. S. Gere & Son, pub. pauper notice, 2 25 

B. & M. R. R., freight, 25 

E. S. Warner, inspection, 100 00 

C. T. Bagnall, tax bills and stationery, 6 90 
Metcalf & Co., order book, 9 00 
Herman Buchloz, costumes Hadley parade 18 00 
Todds, bunting, " " 12 26 
McCallums, bunting, " 12 54 
R. M. Guilford, hacks, " " 6 00 

F. S. O'Brien, " " ll 6 00 
John Bitner, work float, 6 25 
Express, parade, 1 60 
F. H. Bardwell, " float, 2 00 
Alfred E. Breor, team, parade, 4 00 
John McHugh, Jr., team, 4 00 
J. S. Bardwell, driving team, 2 00 
V. H. Keller, cash paid, " " 8 65 
Barry Printing Co., election blanks, 1 62 
Laura Billings, banner for Hadley parade, 2 69 
E. S. Warner, inspecting beeves, etc., 64 00 
A. B. Wolfram, repairs Hall West Brok, 25 00 
Leroy Graves, repairs Town hall, 1 00 
Boston Nickel Plating Co., plating weights, 7 95 
L. J. Pellissier, twine, 35 
Bill Brothers Co., safe, 160 00 
Express on weights, 1 08 
L. H. Kingsley, recording and indexing 

births, mar. and deaths, 44 80 

L. H. Kingsley, posting Selectmens warrants 11 00 
L. H. Kingsley, stamps, envelopes, paper 

and pencils, 
L. H. Kingslep, forest fire ballots, 
L. H. Kingsley, express and typewriter 

supplies, 
Frank Malinoski, burial Frank Dembroski, 



17 


18 




83 


4 


30 


50 


00 



$865 39 



22 

MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Howard & Smith, coal, $49 74 

Gas, 11 20 

R. D. Graves, plumbing, 2 00 

Brownell & Dickinson, repairing roof, 20 68 

L. H. Kingsley, janitor, 75 00 

M. J. Ryan, supplies, 2 28 



$160 90 
BONDS FOR TOWN OFFICERS 

Wm. M. Cochran, treasurer, $ 24 00 

Wm. M. Cochran, collector, 20 00 



$44 00 

SMITH AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 

Tuition, $370 00 

MUSTER DAY 

F. G. Howard, chief, $75 00 

MEMORIAL DAY 

C. K, Morton, appropriation, $75 00 

STREET LIGHTING 

Hatfield Gas Co., $ 150 00 

Amherst Gas Co., 813 16 



$963 16 

WATER RATES 
Hatfield Water Works, water, $500 00 



23 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



J. L. Gilford, books, 
Underwood, photo views 
Wm. G. Atkins, blanks, 
Holyoke Bindery, binding books, 
Bridgman & Lyman, books, 



$ 20 00 

11 75 

3 50 

13 50 

97 24 



CM. Barton, librarian and catalog books, 153 09 
Mrs. C. K. Morton, books and supplies, 25 92 



$325 00 



ORDINARY REPAIRS— HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 



F. H. Bardwell, team and labor, 


$ 12 00 


H. Shumway 


i i i 


234 00 


J. S. Bardwell, 


i t i 


211 25 


Howard & Smith, 


i i i 


87 43 


John C. Ryan, 


< ( < 


19 25 


Wm. W. Langdon, 


< i i 


8 00 


Wm. E. Boyle, 


i < t 


18 00 


A. W. Morton, 


< i i 


12 00 


John B. Vollinger, 


< ( i 


11 50 


James L. Boyle, 


i 1 1 


6 00 


Daniel P. Sheehan, 


i i i 


17 00 


M. J. Proulx, 


< ( * 


26 75 


John W. Kiley, 


< ( i 


20 00 


P. W. Mullins, 


i i i 


4 00 


F. G. Vollinger, 


i i i 


12 25 


Whalen Bros., 


i i i 


8 


B. M. Warner, 


i i i 


8 00 


Alfred E. Breor, 


i i < 


6 00 


Wm. H. Belden, 


' " 


33 60 


E.W. & S. H. Field, ' 


i i i 


4 30 


John M. Strong, 


i < t 


2 00 


Thos. J. Ryan, 


< i 


273 92 


L- B. Waltz, 


( < 


98 89 


J. L. Sheehan, 


< < 


98 02 



24 



Wm. S. Murphy, 


$ 7 00 


Jacob Geis, 


54 25 


Bazyli Buchaek, 


21 00 


George Eberlein, 


11 75 


John Merrick, 


25 38 


John Deinlein, 


2 75 


Fred W. Schepp, sand and 


8 00 


Wm. P. Boyle, 


1 40 


Michael Spurber, 


1 25 


David Powers, 


2 75 


John Toniskey, 


2 25 


Tony Bodise, 


2 25 


Mike Kowalsky, " 


2 25 


John Zoszylia, 


1 50 


P.T.Boyle, 


3 50 


John Fusek, 


10 50 


J. H. Howard, supplies, 


23 03 


D. W. Wells, snow paths, 


1 50 


Nelson Allaire, sand, 


1 40 


Express, 


2 50 


Repairs on steam roller, 


4 84 


S. E. Briggs, filing saws, 


1 00 


W. N. Potter's Sons, cement, 


14 00 


H. E. Bardwell, paint, spikes, etc., 


28 40 


Howard & Smith, coal, 


25 73 


John L. Smith, scraper edges, 


16 00 


Brownell & Dickinson, work on fence, 


24 83 


Foster Bros., wire, supplies, 


31 62 


A. L. Strong, lumber, 


15 60 


Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 


47 05 


Archie P. Graves, plank, 


236 25 


Ed. N. Dickinson, " 


122 10 


F. T. Bardwell, 


100 00 


City of Northampton, stone, 


10 50 


Albert H. Marsh, labor, 


3 00 


M. J. Ryan, supplies, 


21 04 


Edgar H. Field, labor, 


12 45 



$2132 78 



25 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 



Miss Hazel Cheney, teaching $130 00 


C. Mabal Barton 


253 00 


Mary E. Broer, 


143 00 


Katherine W. Day, 


396 00 


Edith L. Leland, 


383 00 


Lulu L. Burbank, 


383 00 


Sarah V. Kiley, 


383 00 


Mary J. Mulcahy, " 


396 00 


Margaret A. Ryan, 


396 00 


Ethel P. Moore, 


288 00 


Mary Decker, 


383 00 


Katherine E. Murray, 


230 00 


Lucille Gravestein, 


drawing 132 00 


Christine A. Reece, 


music 94 66 


Charlotte Woods, 


64 00 


M. H. Bowman, services as Superinl 


.endent 542 32 


transportation ticke 


ts 88 80 


supplies and telephone 17 66 


J. L. Hatmnett Co., books and supplies 173 56 


American Book Co., 


82 54 


Ginn & Co., 


69 93 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co., " 


8 08 


E. E. Babb & Co., 


22 94 


D. C. Heath & Co., 


5 63 


Silver, Burdette & Co., " 


35 50 


Rand & McNally Co., 


48 52 


Milton Bradley Co., 


15 28 


Masury, Young & Co., no-dusto 


26 00 


L. S. Crafts, book-cases 


24 00 


Charles Flynn, janitor 


105 60 


Scott Harris, 


104 00 


John Salvas, 


55 90 


Silas G. Hubbard, 


49 00 


Mrs. Coney Liebl, 


60 50 


Kate Ginchas, cleaning 


7 87 


Andrew Hilbert 


7 00 



J. H. Howard, 


supplies 


L. A. Powers, 


and express 


John J. Betsold, 


" labor 


F. J. Saffer, 


labor 


F. L. Betsold, 


i i 


David Landry, 


i i 


H. R. Holden, 


i i 


Howard & Smith 


i < 


it < < 


coal 


A. L. Strong, 


lumber 



26 

Louise' Shea, " $6 75 

Katherine Flynn, " 7 00 

Miss Cornelia M. Wickles, sweeping 67 50 

Kate Wickles, - " 2 25 

Mary E. Broer, " 3 25 

Katherine W. Day, " 9 00 

Mary J. Mulcahy, ribbon 63 

Ethel P. Moore, tickets 1 80 

6 92 

labor 36 09 

15 50 

1 88 

73 01 

10 00 

1 00 

2 55 
447 86 

5 00 

Merrick Lumber Co., " 53 77 

C. N. Fitts Co., desk and supplies 84 60 

Foster Bros., " 44 20 

A. L. Harris, books 3 00 

Town of Deer field, supplies 2 04 

C. H. Crafts, wood 18 00 

John Evans, repairing roofs 9 45 

Shumway & Riley, plumbing 9 73 

W. H. Riley & Co., " 8 73 

R. D. Graves, " 30 89 

F. M. Crittenden, supplies and printing 6 00 

Herald Job Print, printing school reports 16 80 

John M. Strong, carrying scholars 6 00 

Steve Vochula, " " 6 00 

grading yard 4 60 

John C. Ryan, team and labor 7 00 

Express 2 79 

Thaddeus Graves, Jr., labor ll 85 

school census 18 00 

Thaddeus Graves, cementing cellar 69 19 



27 



G. Henry Clark, repairing clock 
L. L. Vollinger, 

Wm, P. Boyle, repairing and painting 
M.J. Ryan, supplies 



1 


00 


5 


00 


151 


75 


14 


59 


$6,888 59 



RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN 

Town Officers, $1,349 25 

Old Bills, 38 25 

School Physicians, 100 00 

Highways and Bridges, 2,T32 78 

Schools, 6,888 59 

Poor, 1,081 29 

Hardening Coffey Road, 172 51 

Lafrenier Case, 276 18 

Contingencies, 865 39 

Fire Department, 358 66 

Cemeteries, 100 00 

Smith Academy, 500 00 

Bonds, 44 00 

Tree Warden, 100 03 

Smith Ag'l School, 370 00 

Muster Day, 75 00 

Memorial Day, 75 00 

Street Lighting, 963 16 

Water Rates, 500 00 

State Aid, 72 00 

Memorial Building, 160 90 

Fill on Plain, 187 79 

Public Library, 325 00 

Sewers, 1,981 84 

Three Iron Bridges, 500 03 

Cronin's Hill, 63 75 

Main and Elm street Stone Road, 1,816 06 



28 

State Road, $ 5,421 22 



$26,518 08 

LIST OF APPROPRIATIONS VOTED TO BE RAISED 
AT THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

hkij) March 15, 1909 

For Memorial Day, 
Cemeteries, 
Teacher of Music, 
Teacher of Drawing, 
Schools, 

School Physicians, 
Muster Day, 

Cronin's Hill-Improving, 
Sewer Extension — Main and Elm 

streets $1,400 Ass' d '09, 
Repairs Highways and Bridges, 
New Bridges at Cow, Cronin's Hill 
and Strong's Mill, 
Hardening Coffey Road, 
Permanent Roads — Main and Elm sts. 
Public Library, 
Tuition — Smith Academy, 
Poor, 

Lighting Public Streets, 

Tuition — Indust. School, Northampton 400 00 
Purchasing Fire Apparatus, 
Town Water Rates, 
Interest, 

Salaries - Town Officers, 
Bonds, 
Memorial Building, 



$75 00 


100 00 


150 00 


150 00 


5,100 00 


100 00 


75 00 


100 00 


700 00 


1,500 00 


500 00 


300 00 


1800 00 


325 00 


500 00 


800 00 


1,200 00 


n 400 00 


300 00 


500 00 


400 00 


1,400 00 


50 00 


150 00 



29 

Town Debt— Note— Depot Road, $1,000 00 

Contingencies, 800 00 

Sewer North Main Street, 350 00 



$18,825 00 

JOHN C. RYAN, ^ Selectmen 

C. EDWARD WARNER, > of 
THOS. J. RYAN. J Hatfield 

I have examined the books of the Selectmen of the town 
of Hatfield, and have found them correct. 

CHARLES K. MORTON, Auditor 
Hatfield, March 7, 1910. 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD, 1910. 



Name 

Michael P. Kiley, 
Thomas W. Ryan, 
Charles S. Shattuck, 
Charles W. Wade, 
Thaddeus Graves, Jr., 
Edward A. Ryan, 
John W. Kiley, 
Paul Balise, 
G. Raymond Billings, 
Eugene Jubenville, 
Thomes M. O'Dea, 
Archie P. Graves, 
Edson S. Crafts, 
Joseph S. Newman, 
John L. Sheehan, 
Larkin M. Proulx, 
John E- Porter, 



Occupation 

Farmer 

Clerk 

Manufacturer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Lathe Manufacturer 



30 



Thomas P. Fitzgerald, Farmer 

Matthew J. Ryan, Merchant 

George A. Chandler, Farmer 

Gilbert E. Morton, Farmer 

Edward N. Dickinson, Farmer 

John J. Betsold, Farmer 

William E. Boyle, Farmer 

Joseph. E Stoddard, _ Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 

DR. 

To balance in Treasurer, $ 1540 41 

To cash received from A. L. Strong, collector 1908, 4864 34 
E. L. Graves, coll. 1909, 18,137 54 

2900 00 

40 84 

2 00 

1 00 

5 00 

140 50 

118 22 

9 00 

30 

318 24 

968 53 

236 62 

97 00 

4 65 

30 00 

50 50 

462 96 



Treas. Water Commissions, 

District Court, fines and fees, 

Pool license, 

Auctioneer's license, 

Slaughter licenses, 

Refunding of dog fund, 

Sale of tile, 

Rent of Town Hall, 

M. H. Bowman, supplies sold, 

State, Corporation Tax, 

National Bank Tax, 

Street Railway Tax, 

State Aid, 

Support of sick paupers, 

Inspection of animals, 

City of Boston, tuition, 

Supt. of Schools, 

Income Mass. school fund 736 68 

Mass. Highway Com. 6,452 31 
Estate Frank Dembroski, 50 00 

Estate William Matras, 92 00 



32 



To cash received from City of Northampton, tuition, $191 91 



Sale of lumber, 


3 50 


Sale of cement, 


80 


John Petzen, cemetery plot, 


50 


James Porter, 


50 


Reuben F.Wells, sidewalk assm't 43 37 


M. F. Sampson, 


10 94 


J. H. Howard, 


96 90 


Cordelia Hubbard, 


16 40 


Edward A. Ryan, " 


30 95 


JohnMcHugh,Jr., " 


48 15 


Levi L. Pease, sewer 


33 00 


John McHugh, 


33 00 


Joseph Goclowsky, 


33 00 


J. H. Howard, 


33 00 


Malcolm Crawford, " 


33 00 


First Parish, 


33 00 


Smith Academy, 


33 00 


F. H. Bardwell, 


33 00 


John T. Powers, 


33 00 


Emma A. Waite, 


33 00 


Emma E. Breor, 


33 00 


John F. Day, 


33 00 


David Billings, 


33 00 


H. L. Howard. 


33 00 


D. W. Wells. 


33 00 


Tames L. Day, 


33 00 


J. E. Porter, work & 


41 25 


Sam'l F. Billings, 


33 00 


John T. Burke, 


33 00 


Elizabeth H. Abbott,' 4 


33 00 


C. L. Warner, 


33 00 




38,403 81 



33 

TO CASH REC'D FROM TEMPORARY LOANS 

Jose, Parker & Co., 6 mos. Note, $6,894 47 

Northampton Ins. for Savings, 4 mos Note 7,000 00 

•' 6 " " 3,000 00 
Demand Note, 150 00 17,044 47 





$55,448 28 


To cash received from Estate Charlotte G. Wilkie, 


$1,333 82 




$56,782 10 


CR. 




By cash paid Selectmen's orders, 


$26,518 08 


Interest on Water Bonds 


2,000 00 


District Court fees and expenses, 


81 36 


Interest on temporary loans, 


329 69 


Interest on outstanding loans, 


53 33 


County Tax, 


2,463 96 


State Tax, 


2,038 70 


Treas. Sinking Fund, 


861 67 


Balance in Treasury, 


1,101 49 




$35,448 28 



BY CASH PAID TEMPORARY AND OUTSTANDING 

LOANS. 

Jose, Parker & Co., Depot Road Note, $1,000 00 
Northampton Inst, for Savings, note, 2,000 00 

Jose, Parker & Co., 6 mos. note, 7,000 00 

Northampton Inst for Savings, 6 mos note 3,000 00 

11 " " 4 " " 7,000 00 20,000 00 



$55,448 28 
By cash deposited Bank, Charlotte G. Wilkie fund, 1,333 82 

$56,782 10 



34 

IN ACCOUNT WITH A. L. STRONG, COLLECTOR. 
1908 TAXES. 

DR. 

To Cash received, $4,864 34 

To Assessors Orders of Abatements, 113 74 



$4,978 08 



CR. 

By Uncollected Taxes, $4,938 31 

By Interest on Taxes 39 77 



4,978 08 



IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 
1909 TAXES 

DR. 

To cash received, $18,137 54 

Uncollected Taxes, 4,334 95 

Discount on Taxes, 327 98 

■ .r 22, 800 47 

CR. 

By Assessors Warrant, $22,307 47 

Addition to Warrant, 442 53 

Interest collected, 50 47 

22,800 47 

WATER SINKING FUND 

DR. 

To 30 years 4 per cent Water Bonds, $50,000 00 

CR. 
By Sinking Fund, $14,735 22 



35 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT. 

DR. 

Northampton Inst for Savings, note $3,000 00 

Water Sinking Fund, note 927 52 

Demand Note, 150 00 

Depot Road Note— due from taxes 1910, $1,000 00 



5,077 52 



CR. 

By uncollected taxes, 
Due from State Aid, 

State, Inspection of animals, 

City of Northampton, tuition, 
' ' Sidewalk Assessments, 

Sewer Assessments, 

Sale of tile, 
Balance in Treasury, 

Balance in favor of the town, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer 

I have examined the books and accounts of the Treasurer 
of the Town of Hatfield, and have found them correct, with 
Selectmen's orders on file for all payments made; — with can- 
celled Notes and receipts for State and County taxes and 
interest paid. I find a balance in the Treasury of Eleven 
hundred and one and 49-100 dollars. ($1,101.49). 

CHARLES K. MORTON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, March 7th, 1910. 



$4,334 95 






72 


00 






32 


00 






i, 168 


00 






770 


66 






330 00 






76 


02 






1,101 


49 










6,885 


12 










$1,807 60 



Water Commissioners' Report. 



The following is respectfully submitted as the fourteenth 
annual report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows : — 

Balance of cash from last year's account $ 915 00 
Cash from collection of water rates 4,053 57 

Connections with main pipe 54 00 

Advance of C. L. Warner on construction 257 82 



We have paid the past year as follows : — 

Town of Hatfield, water rates 

Norwood Engineering- Co., hydrants, valves, etc 

Chas. Miller & Son Co., lead 

11 11 11 It. . A • 1 

iron pipe, 4 men 
M.J. Ryan, laying pipe and expenses 
Damage to wheels on highway, 
W. H. Riley & Co., jute and 1 in. iron pipe 

" supplies to supt. 
LaFleur Bros., paint for hydrants 
Boston & Maine Railroad, freight 
R. D. Graves, labor 
Northampton Water Works, specials 
C. L. Warner, advance on construction 
Charles W. Wade, collection of water rates 

labor and cash paid 
Balance, cash on hand 



$5,280 


39 


$2900 


00 


171 


95 


83 


98 


899 


67 


479 


58 


19 


35 


84 


90 


52 


98 


5 


40 


1 


40 


2 


92 


6 


21 


261 


17 


121 


60 


141 


56 


47 


72 


$5280 39 



37 

There are now 326 connections with private property, 90 
hydrants for fire protection, 5 water tanks, water in 5 school 
houses and in Memorial Hall. 

There has beenflaid the past year 364T feet of 4*inch cast 
iron water main on fthe Plain and at Bradstreet with three 
hydrants at a cost of $1608.16, and about 800 feet of 1 inch 
galvanized iron pipe to the house of John Steel at a cost of 
$74.48 } oJu £ o*^ H iv H > J 6 

CHARLES L. WARNER ^ 

Hatfield 

DANIEL W. WELLS } WaUr 

I 

M. J. PROULX Commissioners 

I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the Town of Hat- 
field and have found them correct with vouchers on file 
for all payments made. 

CHARLES K. MORTON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 2, 1910. 



Town Clerk's Report. 



The Vital Statistics for the Town of Hatfield for the year 
1909, are as follows : — 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS 



January 

February 

March 

April 

June 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total 



No. 


Males 


Females 


4 





4 


9 


2 


7 


5 


3 


3 


7 


2 


6 


7 


6 


1 


5 


1 


4 


4 


4 





3 


2 


1 


5 


5 





7 


5 


2 



64 



30 



34 



BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 



Born in Canada 

United States 
Poland 
Germany 
Hungary 



father 


Mother 


1 


1 


16 


18 


42 


42 


3 


1 


2 


2 



64 



64 



39 

BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 
1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 



52 64 68 67 92 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

No. 

January 4 

February 5 

April 1 

May 2 

June 6 

August 2 

September 5 

October 1 

November 5 

December 1 

33 

First marriage of both parties 32 

Second marriage of groom, first of bride 1 

The oldest and youngest grooms were thiry-five and 
twenty-one years of age respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were thirty-one and six- 
teen years of age respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PEOPLE MARRIED 



Born in United States 
Poland 
Hungary 
Canada 



Groom 


Bride 


18 


18 


12 


12 


2 


2 


1 


1 



33 33 



40 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 
1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 



17 



30 32 33 

DEATHS BY MONTHS 



January 

February 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



21 



STo. 


Males 


Females 


2 





2 


2 


2 


2 


3 





3 


2 


1 


1 


4 


3 


1 


3 


1 


2 


4 


1 


3 


3 


2 


1 


1 


1 





1 








4 


1 


3 



31 



13 



18 







No. 


Males 


Females 


Under 1 year 


of age 


10 


5 


5 


Between 1 and 5 years 











5 


10 


1 





1 


10 


20 











20 


30 











30 


40 


4 


1 


3 


40 


50 











50 


60 


4 


2 


2 


60 


70 


7 


2 


5 


70 


80 


2 ■ 


2 





80 


90 


3 


1 


2 



31 13 

Age of oldest person deceased (female) 88 years 



18 



41 

CAUSES OF DEATH 

Classified according to the nomenclature adopted by the 
State Board of Registration. 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES 

Malarial Fever, 1 

Cholera-Infantum, 3 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES 

Cancer, 3 

Tuberculosis, 2 

DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES 

Infantile debility, 1 

Premature birth, 2 

Still born, 2 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Hypertrophied Prostrate, 1 

Apoplexy, 3 

Nephritis, 2 

Pneumonia, 4 

Heart Disease, 1 

Uraemia, 1 

Appendicitis, . 1 

Brights Disease, 1 

Hemorrhage, 1 

VIOLENT DEATHS. 

Suicide, 1 

Found dead, 1 



31 



42 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED. 



Hannah A. B. Wells, 
Martin Lyons, 
Bridget Nolan, 
Zigniont Maxinoski, 
Edward B. Dickinson, 
John F. Kiely, 
Robert McEwen Woods. 
Sarah M. Field, 
Mary Abromzick, 
Frank Kalos, 
Annie Kulek, 
Deforest E. Shattuck, 
Julia Ann Fitch, 
Nellie Karakula, 



Jennie M. Barton, 
Margaret Karakula, 
Charles W. Marsh. 
Julia A. Brainerd, 
John M. Smith, 
John Petsen, 
Anna Casten, 
Emma E. Billings, 
Katherine Ryan, 
Rose Donis, 
Sarah E. Sanderson, 
John S. Carl, 
John E. Waite, 
George L. Marsh. 



DOG LICENSES. 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending No- 
vember 30, 1909, with the receipts and settlements of the ac- 
count with the County Treasurer, is as follows: — 

90 male dogs at $2.00 each, $ 180 00 

4 female dogs at $5.00 each, 20 00 



$ 200 00 
Less fees, 94 dogs at 20 cents each, 18 80 

Paid to County Treasurer, $ 181 20 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 



Town Clerk. 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed personal estate, $ 213,639 00 
real estate, 1,113,203 00 



Total value of assessed estate, 
Value of assessed buildings, 
land, 


$1,326,842 00 
$ 626,772 00 
486,431 00 






$1,113,203 00 


No. of male polls assesed, 

residents assessed on proj 
All others, (Corporations, etc.) 


ierty, 


539 
317 
34 




351 


No. of non-residents assessed on 
All others, 


property, 


55 

27 



82 



No. of persons assessed on property, 433 

For poll tax only, 287 



720 

Rate of total tax per $1,000, $16 00 

No. of horses assessed, (4 mules) 450 

" cows, 288 

neat cattle, 73 

swine, 14 

" fowl, 641 



44 



No. of dwelling houses, 






340 


acres of land, 






9,260 


State Tax 




$ 2,038.70 




County Tax m 




2,463.96 




Town Tax 




17,525.00 




Overlayings 




279.81 








$22,307 47 


Estimated bank and cor. 


tax 




1,300 00 


Conn. Val. St. Ry. Co., 


excise tax 




301 32 



Value of property exempt from taxation, Chap. 12, Sec. 
5, Revised Laws. 

Literary institutions, $70,860 00 

Church property, 27,000 00 

$97,860 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. H. BELDEN, ] Assessors 
EDSON W. STRONG, V of 
L. H. KINGSLEY, j Hatfield 



Report of the Sinking: Fund 
Commissioners. 



We have the following amounts deposited to the credit 
of the sinking- fund : 



Florence Savings Bank 


$ 945 84 


Nonotuck 


1029 12 


Haydenville Savings Bank 


420 66 


Easthampton 


457 37 


Hampden 


1000 00 


Northampton Institution for 




Savings 


954 71 


N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co.'s 




Notes 


2000 00 


N.Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co.'s 5 




Bonds 


2000 00 


Boston & Maine R. R. Co. Bonds 


3000 00 


Town of Hatfield Water 


2000 00 


11 " " " Note 


927 52 




$14,735 22 



M.J.RYAN \ Sinking Fund 

E. S. WARNER y Commissionm 

I have examined the accounts of the Sinking Fund Com- 
missioners of the town of Hatfield and find in their possession 
securities amounting to fourteen thousand, seven hundred and 
hirty-five and 22—100 ($14,735.22) dollars. 

CHARLES K. MORTON, Auditor, 
Hatfield, Mass., March 3, 1910, 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



of the; 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE 



Year Ending March J, 1910 



49 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Lawrence A. Powers, Chairman, 1909 

Thaddeus Graves, Jr., Sec, 1911 
John J. Betsold, 1910 

M. H. Bowman, Superintendent 



Truant Officers 

S. W. Kingsley and A. L. Strong 

Authorized to sign Certificates for children between the 
ages of 14 and 16. 

M. H. Bowman. 



School Census September J, 1909 

No. of boys between the ages of 5 and 15, 130 

No. of girls " " 5 and 15, 120 

Total, 250 



No. of boys between the ages of 7 and 14, ° 

No. of girls " 7 and 14, 96 



Total, 180 

No. of male illiterate minors over 14 years of age, none. 
No of female illiterate minors over 14 years of age, none. 



50 



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Report of School Committee 



During the past year many repairs were made on the 
several school buildings. 

At the Center School new set bowls were put in two of the 
rooms which have proved very satisfactory. 

A cement floor was laid in basement of Hill School which 
for many years has been greatly needed. 

At Bradstreet a new floor was laid and new seats put in. 
These add greatly to the appearance of the room. 

In one of the rooms the desks, which were in a badly 
defaced condition, were planed and gone over with a hard 
finish giving them the appearance of new. 

Each building has been supplied with a coal sifter. These 
have saved the fuel to quite an extent. 

The walls of all the rooms have been gone over. No- 
dusto has been applied to all the floors. All the buildings 
have been thoroughly cleaned at the beginning of each term 
so we feel that the buildings have been kept in as nearly a 
sanitary condition as possible. 

These and many other minor repairs show to some extent 
what has been done. 

We feel that as far as possible schools that are not at 
present connected with the sewer should be in the near future. 
Our outbuildings, which are usually in very bad condition, 
could then be done away with and sanitary conditions much 
improved. 

L. A. POWERS, Chairman, 





54 








SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 




RESOURCES 








Town appropriation, 

Dog fund, 

Income Mass. School Fund, 

State Supt., 

City of Northampton, tuition. 

City of Boston, tuition, 


i 


$ 


5400 00 
140 50 
736 68 
462 96 
168 00 
50 50 










$6958 64 


Orders drawn on treasury, 








$6888 59 



Superintendent's Report. 



To the School Committee of Hatfield : 

I hereby submit for your consideration my fifth annual 
report of the schools of Hatfield ending Dec. 31, 1909. It 
also contains the usual appended reports and statistics. 

With the passing of the calendar year another school 
year has been completed. The weeks have not been charac- 
terized by any great changes ; yet the rythmic beat of daily 
work has been perceptable throughout the entire period. It 
is a source of no small gratification that only one change was 
necessitated in the teaching force. The resignation of Miss 
Breor, after years of very efficient and sucessful service, was 
a distinct loss to the corps of teachers and also to the town. 
Miss Barton, who at the commencement of the fall term as- 
sumed charge of the Hill primary school, came to her work 
finely trained and with a long successful experience. The 
return, year after year, of well trained teachers to their schools 
in this town, when they could have secured desirable positions 
elsewhere, argues well for the town and its schools. It may 
be added, with commendable modesty, that the salary paid is 
a large factor. The policy to pay a good teacher a fair wage 
and not hesitating to increase her salary a dollar or two per 
week, when she has shown ability and fidelity to her work, 
has been repaid in the golden coin of greater school efficiency. 

That the year has passed without any serious or wide- 
spread illness among the children is a source of thankfulness. 
Doubtless much credit is due the school committee who have 
earnestly endeavored to keep the school buildings in a proper 
condition and the school physicians that have carefully 
watched over the children and encouraged the best sanitary 



56 

living. Yet for several years it has appeared to the superin- 
tendent that some changes ought to be made in and about 
the various school buildings that would contribute largely to 
the health and comfort of the children. The installing of 
town water and set bowls at the Center school building last 
fall has proved both servicable and healthful. However, two 
other things ought to be done at this building, namely, the 
removal of the outbuildings and the construction of closets 
inside of the building and connecting them with the sewer. 
While sanitary conditions in the other school buildings are 
far from perfection and ought to be improved at an early date 
yet it might be desirable to delay action another year, except 
at the Hill school where slight changes ought to be made at 
once. 

The moral education involved in sanitary school surround- 
ings is immeasurable. They may inculcate principles of 
neatness and fitness or they may leave impressions that 
only eternity can efface. 

The heating of the various school buildings involves care 
as well cost. After considerable observation we think that 
both furnaces in the Hill building and two in the Center 
building ought to be relocated and ventilating shafts built from 
the floor of the school rooms to the attic. By doing this, fuel 
could be saved, ventilation secured, and only pure air ad- 
mitted to the school room. At present much of the air is 
taken from the basement. Comment is unnecessary. The 
best ventilated school building in town is the West. While 
the position of the furnace and ventilating stack appear a 
little cumbersome yet ^the principle of ventilation is correct 
and good results are secured. 

In closing I desire to express my appreciation of the 
faithful work of the teachers, the cordial attitude of the citi- 
zens, and the continued confidence and support of the 
school committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MORTIMER H. BOWMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 



Report of School Physician 



To the School Committee of Hatfield, Mass., 

Your School Physicians have in earlier reports drawn 
attention to importance of physical examination which aims 
to discover defects and physical conditions, as distinguished 
from detection of communicable disease. 

Now, in illustration we would state that in the matter of 
chronic throat troubles, (worth watching but not all requiring 
individual reports to parents), about one-quarter of the chil- 
dren in Hatfield Public schools suffer from enlarged tonsils. 

Such pupils are more susceptible to exposure and disease. 

By examination and advice we hope to increase health 
and vitality of all of the pupils. There is a noticeable im- 
provement of general conditions this school-year. 

Some trouble has been experienced from impetigo, a con- 
tagious skin-disease, but at the present time, the schools are 
free from it. Pediculosis and scabies made their appearance 
and are being cared for with some trouble, as it seems impos- 
sible to obtain the co-operation of parents, in some cases ; thus 
keeping a focus of infection present. 

At this time we think it advisable, to call attention to the 
sanitary condition of the schools and ask that all schools be 
connected with sewers. 

CHAS. A. BYRNE 
A. J. BONNEVILLE 
Feb. 10th, 1910. 



Report of Supervisor of Music 



Mr. M. H. Bowman, Superintendent of Schools'. — 

The work in music has been conducted along the same 
lines as formerly. 

In the first grades, the work is chiefly with scale tones. 
The pupil should gain the ability to recognize the relativity of 
the tones and to sing the same independently and correctly. 
Songs are taught mostly by rote. The pupils become 
acquainted with the staff, the names of the lines and spaces 
and learn to read simple exercises. 

The intermediate grades are taught to sing two-part songs 
with some attempt at artistic rendering. They become more 
efficient in the singing of scale tones and are taught in advance 
to sing and recognize the finer chromatic tones. More com- 
plicated drill in tone principles is pursued. 

We try to have the upper grades sing appreciatively three- 
part songs. This individual work includes the singing of both 
scale tones and chromatic tones, a thorough knowledge of 
major and minor scales in all keys and a complete drill in 
tone principles. 

This in brief is what we are working to attain. The suc- 
cess of our work depends on the co-operation of the grade 
teachers in their patient daily work with the individual pupils. 
The supervisor wishes here to extend to them her appreciation 
of their persevering efforts. 

The training of the child in music is many sided: — 

First, it requires concentration of thought, discipline of 
mind to gain a mastery of musical language, its sounds and 
symbols to sing accurately and appreciatively songs and 
exercises at sight. It requires quick calculation on the part 



59 

of the pupils to think in tones for these tones must be related 
to each other in accurate sequence and must be sung in a cer- 
tain indicated time. 

Secondly, the individual learns to be self-reliant and to 
lose that self-concious feeling when he is required from the 
very beginning to sing alone. This is not considered by the 
children to be a strange performance nor at all extraordinary 
but it is the expected requirement. 

Thirdly, the child gains an appreciation of good music 
and learns to recognize beauty in melody and rythme. He 
unconsiously falls into the spirit of music and enjoys being 
able to read at sight and to interpret to some degree songs on 
first acquaintance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLOTTE WOODS, 

Supervisor of Music. 



Report of Supervisor of Drawing 



Mr. M. H. Bowman , Superintendent of Schools ; 

In presenting the subject of drawing, I have aimed to 
culivate in the student an appreciation of the beauty of order. 

The work in all the schools is in advance of what it was 
last year and many of the schools are doing all that is possible 
toward laying a foundation for acquiring knowledge in draw- 
ing, — free-hand, mechanical and design. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LUCILE GRAVESTEIN, Supervisor of Drawing 

Northampton, Feb. 4, 1910. 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 
April 4, 1910 Schools open 





19, 


< < 


Patriots' Day, holiday 


May 


27, 


< < 


Patriotic exercises 




30, 


t < 


Memorial Day, holiday 


June 


17, 


< < 


Schools close 


Sept. 


7, 


( < 


Schools open 


Nov. 


23-2< 


t ' ' 


Thanksgiving recess 


Dec. 


16, 


< < 


Schools close 


Jan. 


2 


1911 


Schools open 


Feb. 


21, 


t i 


Patriotic exercises 




22, 


< i 


Washington's Birthday, holiday 


Mar. 


17, 


< < 


Schools close 


April 


3, 


1 1 


Schools open 




19, 


i < 


Patriots' Day, holiday 


May 


29, 


i i 


Patriotic exercises 




30, 


i i 


Memorial Day, holiday 


June 


16, 


i i 


Schools close 



RESIGNATIONS 
Hill primary, Mary E. Breor, resigned 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 




m- 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



FOR THE 



Year Ending March I, 1911 



Articles in the Warrant for Town Meetings 
March 20, 1911* 



Article 1 — To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2 — To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; one Assessor 
for three years; Town Treasurer; one School Committee for 3 
years; one Water Commissioner for 3 years; one Sinking Fund 
Commissoner for 3 years; one Trustee for Public Library for 
3 years; Auditor; Tree Warden; Elector under the will of 
Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; six Constables; and to vote on 
the question — '"Yes" or ''No" — Shall Licenses be granted for 
the Sale of intoxicating liquors in this town? All the forego- 
ing to be voted for on one ballot. 

Article 3 — To hear the reports of the various town officers 
and act thereon. 

Article 4— To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5 -To take action in relation to maintenance and 
repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing year. 

Article 6 — To take action in relation to raising money 
and appropriating same to defray the necessary expenses of 
the town for the ensuing vear. 

Article 7— To see what action the town will take in rela- 
tion to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 



Article 8 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Memorial Day. 

Article 9 — To take action in relation to the support of the 
poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appropriate money 
for the same. 

Article 10 - To revise and accept the list of Jurors re- 
ported by the Selectmen. 

Article 1 1 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the care of cemeteries for the ensuing year. 

Article 12— -To see if the town will employ a teacher of 
music in the public schools for the ensuing year, and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 13 — To see if the town will employ a teacher of 
drawing in the public schools for the ensuing year, and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 14— To see is the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 

Article 15 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children in 
Smith Academy, who are of suitable age and attainments to 
attend High School. 

Article 16 — To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Fireman's Muster. 

Article 17— To see if the town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, or a majority thereof, 
to borrow, during the current municipal year, beginning March 
1st, 1911, in anticipation of the taxes for said municipal year, 
such sums of money as may be necessary for the current ex- 
penses of the town, giving the notes of the town therefor, pay* 
able within one year from the dates thereof. 

Article .18— To see if .the town will raise and apprpprate 
money for the employment of one or more School Physicians, 



in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 502 , Acts of 
1906. 

Article 19 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield 
children attending- the Industrial School at Northampton. 

Article 20 — To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for purchasing any supplies or apparatus 
needed by the Fire Department. 

Article 21 — To see if the town will vote to build a per- 
manent road of stone or other material, on Prospect Street, 
from Mill Bridge South to top of Kingsly's Hill, and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 22— To see if the town will authorize the Select- 
men to contract with the Massachusetts Highway Commission, 
according to the provisions of Section 10, Chapter 47, R. L., 
to construct a section of State Highway to be built in Hatfield 
this year. 

Article 23. — To see if the town will authorize the Town 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, or a majority 
thereof, to borrow a sum of money, not exceeding $7,000, to 
construct said highway; said loan to be paid out of the money 
paid the town by the State Highway Commission for con- 
structing said highway. 

Article 24 — To see if the will vote to accept and repair 
as a sewer, the surface drain running into Mill River near 
Frank Malinowski's house on Prospect Street, and raise and 
appropriate money for same. 

Article 25 — To see if the town will repair and harden the 
road this side of Bradstreet, from the Causeway bridge, south 
to the old guide board, and raise and appropriate money for 
the same. 

Article 26 — To see if the town will hear the report of the 
Committee on By-Laws, and act thereon. 



6 

Article 27 — To see if the town will vote to extend its 
Water System at North Hatfield, from L. S. Crafts' corner 
West to house of F. T. Bardwell, and South to house of the 
late Morris Fitzgibbons, and raise and appropriate money for 
the same. 

Article 28 — To see if the town will vote to install any 
more electric lights on any streets in any part of the town, 
and raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 29 — To see if the town will vote to repair side- 
walks in any part of the town, and raise and appropriate 
money for the same. 

Article 30 — To see if the town will vote to build a gravel 
walk on the South side of Chestnut Street, West from the 
residence of F. G. Vollinger's to the first bridge, and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 31 — To see if the town will vote to extend its 
Sewer System on Kim Street, Southwesterly 1500 feet, and 
raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 32 — To see if the town will vote to extend its 
Sewer System on Main Street, South from opposite George 
Saffers' 500 feet to residence of H. E. Bardwell, and raise and 
appropriate money for the same. 

Article 33 — To see if the town will vote to run and estab- 
lish the lines on both sides of the highway on South Street, 
from residence of A. W. Morton — South to brow of Indian 
Hollow Hill. 

Article 34—To see if the the town will have a Commission 
appointed to investigate and ask for a reduction of the Insur- 
ance Rates in the Town of Hatfield. 

Article 35— -To see if the town will vote to build a Macadam 
Road from a point near residence of D. W. Wells to C. S. 
Shattuck's, and same to be paid for in installments of $1000 
each. 



Selectmen's Report. 



To the Citizens of Hatfield, Mass.: 

Gentlemen: — In accordance with the requirements of 
the Public Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for 
the year ending March 1st, 1911, is respectfully submitted. 

Chapter 4l2, Acts of 1910, Section 1. — No. city or town, 
and no department of official of any city or town in this 
Commonwealth, shall publish in any annual or other report 
for general distribution to the public, or to the citizens of any 
city or town, the names of any persons assisted in any way 
by the poor department of any city or town, or the names of 
any persons receiving aid under the provisions of chapter 
seventy-nine of the Revised Laws, and acts in amendment 
thereof and in addition thereto, residing in such city or town. 

STATE AID. 
Paid to three persons $76 00 

POOR EXPENDITURES. 

City of Worcester $ 28 57 

City or Chicopee 46 00 

City of Northampton 148 75 

H. D. Smith, coal 11 75 

C. N. Clarke, rent 12 00 

Aid 5 00 



Clias. A. Byrne, ined. attend, and fumigalini 

A. J. Bonneville, 

H. A. Suitor, 

Board 

M. J. Ryan, supplies 

Edward Proulx, rent 

F. T. O'Brien, hack -- — -•- 

K. W. Brown, med. attend. 
M.J. LaporteCo., ambulance 
P. Ahearn & Co., burial of poor 
Expenses to Tweksbury. 



$187 


50 


20 


00 


4 


50 


39 


00 


204 


83 


102 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


14 


00 


40 


00 


2 


75 



$881 65 



STREET LIGHTS. 



Amherst Gas Co. 



$1,727 00 



SMITH ACADEMY. 
David Billings, Treasurer, tuition 



$1000 00 



CEMETERY APPROPRIATION. 
F. H. Bardwell, Treasurer $100 00 

SMITH INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 
Tuition $335 00 



SEWERS -ELM AND SCHOOL STREETS. 



H. Shumway, 
John C. Ryan, 
Thomas J. Ryan, 
L. B. Waltz, 



team and labor 



$ 10 00 
4 00 

30 00 

31 00 



*9 



labor 



J. L. Sheehan, 

John Merrick, 

F. H. Svveatland, 

Eddie Kempiste, 

Tom Prosat, 

Martin Pole, 

Frank Kulpa. 

George Matula, 

Larry Waskiewicz 

John Zean, 

Nicholas Kulson, 

Martin Karkut, 

John Pole, 

John Kuchyt, 

John Szeringer, 

B. & M. R. Co 

David W. Lewis Co., tile 

Shumway & Riley, traps 

Chas. Millars Sons, iron pipe 

A. L. Smith, brick 

Norwood Eng. Co., catch basins 

E. E. Davis, surveying 



freight on tile 



$29 00 


22 


75 


8 


75 


17 


75 


9 


00 


9 


75 


9 


00 


4 


50 


2 


25 


16 


75 


It 


50 


11 


50 


5 


50 


7 


50 


6 


00 


165 


42 


248 


20 


2 


62 


19 


00 


8 


00 


18 


00 


16 


98 



$724 97 



WATER RATES. 
Hatfield Water Works, water 



$500 00 





INSURANCE. 




C. H. Pierce 




$138 75 


H, M. McCloud 




15 00 



$153 75 



10 



SIDEWALK— NORTH STREET 



John C. Ryan, 
H. Shumway, 
M. J. Proulx, 
Fred Carl, 
D. P. Sheehan, 
Thomas J. Ryan, 
L. B. Waltz, 
J. L. Sheehan, 
Ludwie Krahel, 
Eddie Kupozynski 
John Osley, 



team and labor 



$ 24 00 


20 


00 


12 00 


14 00 


11 


25 


15 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


8 


75 


7 


87 


8 


75 


$141 


62 



MUSTER DAY 



F. G. Howard, chief 



$75 00 



CONTINGENCIES. 



E. L. Graves, stamped env., postage on reports $ 17 51 

Herald Job Print, printing town reports 109 80 

Hobbs & Warren, books— Assessors and Tax Coll. 18 23 

A. J. Bonneville, fumigating and retng. births 21 50 

Chas. A. Byrne, " " " 28 65 

H. A. Suitor, " " 2 75 

Metcalf & Co., printing ballots and order books 21 00 

Hatfield Gas Co., gas Town Hall 15 18 

Scott Harris, care clock and mowing 25 00 

R. W. Lyman, copies of title changes 5 55 

Johnson's Bookstore, Collectors book 1 58 

C. T. Bagnell, tax bills 2 20 

T. M. Connor, law opinion 15 00 

E. S. Warner, meat inspector 165 00 

P. H. Chew, mortgage book 7 00 



11 



W, & L. E. Curley, sealers supplies 

Pneumatic Stamp Co., 

Peler Gray & Son, 

Maiden Specialty Co., 

F. M. Crittenden, printing; 

Locksmith, keys 

L- H. Kingsley, copying valuation book 

Geo. P. O'Donnell, law opinion and contract 

L. L. Peas, land Little Meadow 

P. J. Whalen, trimming trees 

L. H. Kiugsley, indexing, births; marriages, deaths 

L. H. Kingsley, serving Seclectmen's Warrants 

L. J. Pelissier, fish warden 

M.J. Proulx, service as Constable 

J. C. Ryan, preambulating town lines 

C. E. Warner, 

Arthur R. Breor, service Constable 

Geo. Eberlein, repairing hose wagon 

Fred Winsel, storing hose wagon, labor, constable 

Geo. H. Newman, labor at fire 

H. A. Marsh, storing hose wagon 

T. M. Day, 

C. H. Crafts, " use of horse 

Mullins Bros., 

Whalen Bros., 

J. McHugh, drying hose 

E. j. Day 

J. F. Day, 

Geo. A. Boyle, labor at fire 

A. H. Breor, 

Jos. F. Chandler, " 

L. Deinlein, 

John J. Betsold, storing hose wagon 

John J. Betsold, use of horse, drying hose 



$13 05 


81 


4 10 


1 00 


6 50 


1 20 


26 00 


10 00 


175 00 


18 25 


50 30 


11 00 


10 00 


27 00- 


4 00 


2 00 


2 00 


5 65 


10 00 


5 00 


5 00 


5 00 


7 00 


5 50 


6 00 


8 00 


4 00 


4 00 


2 00 


2 00 


3 00 


3 00 


5 00 


5 00 



$901 41 



12 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Rogers Carriage Co., hose wagon 

G. C. Fisk, hose, etc., 

B. 8z M. R. R. Co., freight 



$128 00 

145 00 

11 41 

$284 41 



ORDINARY REPAIRS— HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 



H. Shumway, 
F. T. Bardwell, 
J. S. Newman, 
Alfred E. Breor, 

D. P. Sheehan, 
H. D. Smith, 
H. E. Bardwell, 
John C. Ryan, 
P. T. Boyle, 

M. J. Proulx, 
Archie P. Graves, 
Ernest Godin, 

E. A. Ryan, 
Geo. M. Donelson. 
C. H. Crafts, 
Fred Carl, 

Jas. L. Boyle, 
J. W. Kiley, 
A. W. Houghton, 
Ed. N, Dickinson, 
Thos. J. Ryan, 
L. B. Waltz, 
J. L. Sheehan, 
Joseph Raboin, 
Michael Superba, 
Lewis J. Casten, 

F. H. Sweatland, 



team and labor 



labor 



$305 


73 


32 


50 


45 25 


8 


00 


51 


00 


45 


00 


29 


oo 


104 25 


13 


00 


34 


00 


7 


25 


32 


00 


19 


25 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


8 


00 


4 


00 


8 


19 


288 


26 


97 


37 


73 


65 


21 


00 


3 


00 


rr 
i 


50 


20 


06 



13 



John Merrick, labor 

Frank Pole, 

Eddie Kempiste, 

Ludwik Krahel, 

John Fnsek, 

George Matula, 

Lucas Noreska,' 

Geo- A. Chandler, 

Eddie Kupozynski, 

John Osley, 

John Waskiecz, 

John Pessen, 

John Zarenski, 

Nicholas Kulson, 

John Zean, 

F. G. Vollinger, 

Stan Becker, 

Tom Prosat, 

Michael Blaske, 

John Karen. Jr., 

Peter Brainerd, 

John Monahan, 

Sebastian Gonchas, 

Alex Czelotka, sand 

J. S. Newman, stone 

F. H. Bardwell, team, snow path 

D. W. Wells, 

A. H. xMarsh, 

Metal Culvert Co., culverts 

W. H. Riley & Co,, repairs S. Roller 

J. A. Sullivan, supplies and cement 

Foster Bros., supplies 

L.II'. Kingsley, sand 

John Karen, 

George Eberlein, repairs 

Wm. R. Cutter, posts and wood 

C. Lewis & .Co., steel rods 



$21 


54 


■ 2 


00 


18 


38 


14 


87 


17 


50 


7 


87 


4 


50 


n 
i 


50 


7 


00 


1 


75 


1 


75 


3 


50 


7 


00 


■ 4 


50 


4 


50 


2 


00 


3 


00 


4 


50 


3 


37 


9 


00 


5 


25 


1 


50 


10 


87 


3 


50 


2 


50 


8 


25 


2 


90 


4 


60 


111 


04 


1 


■ 8o 


44 


39 


17 


82 


13 05 


70 


05 


17 


16 


29 


40 


4. 67 



14 



A. L. Strong, lumber 

B. & M. R. R. Co., freight 
H. D. Smith, supplies 
John Stoddard, stone 

H. E. Bard well, roofing 

Wm. P. Boyle, painting 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., repairs 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber 

P F. O'Leary, road signs 

M. J. Ryan, supplies 

F. H. Bardwell, lumber 

J as. L. Day, horse 

Edgar H. Field, labor 



124 


97 


2 


20 


18 


26 


5 00 


3 


00 


13 


90 


3 00 


101 


93 


6 


75 


26 


17 


12 


00 


1 


00 


5 


55 


$2,097 


93 



TOWN OFFICERS. 



John C. Ryan, service as Selectman, 1909 

Thos. J. Ryan, " 1909 

C. Edward Warner, " " 1909 

Daniel W. Wells, Water Commissioner 

M. J Proulx, 

Chas. L. Warner, 

M. T. Proulx Constable 

Fred Winsel, 

S. W. Kingsley, police duty 

Chas. K. Morton, service as Elector and Auditor 

Thaddeus Graves, Jr., service as Ballot Clerk 

Archie P. Graves, 

T. Mullany, 

P.. R. Mullany, 

Scott .Harris, 

Lark in M. Proulx, 

Edson "W. Strong, Assessor, 

Wm.H. Belding, 

L. H. Kingsley, 



$150 00 

75 00 

75 00 

LO 00 

10 00 

10 00 

17 50 

2 00 

28 50 

20 00 

2 00 

4. 00 

2 00 

2 00 

2 00 

I 00 

86. 25' 

110 00 

128 75 



15 



R. W. Webber, Registrar of Voters 

Thos. W. Ryan, 

Saml. F. Billings* 

h. H. Kingsley, Town Clerk, Clerk Bd. Selectmen 

L. H, Kingsley, Town Treasurer 

John J' Betsold, service School Committee 

Arthur R. Breor, 

Thaddeus Graves, Jr., 

E. L. Graves, Tax Collector, 1909 



$8 


00 


8 


00 


8 


00 


l 300 


00 


200 


00 


25 


00 


15 


00 


20 


00 


200 


00 


$1,521 


00 



MEMORIAL DAY. 



Chas. K. Morton 



$75 00 



STATE ROAD. 



Kiely & Gleason, bridge contract, 

H. Shumway, team and labor 

Geo. M. Donelson, 

Geo. M. Donelson, sand 

H. R. Holdeu, 

Jos. S. Newman, 

John C. Ryan, 

H.D. Smith, 

Frank Kosinkoski, 

F. T. Bardwell, 

P. J. Donovan, 

Steve Vochula, 

D. P. Sheehan, " " .-.. . 

J. W. Kiley' 

J.-M. Strong, " '' . ;_ 

Thos. J. Ryan, labor ';..•■ t2l * 

Joseph Ryan, 

J. L, Sheehan, 



$3,396 87 
381 20 

285 20 
85 00 

199 20 
221 20 

286 20 
12 00 
44 00 
38 00 
46 00 
61 : 00 
40 00 
16 00 

J2 00 
494 0^) 
::52 63 
234 13 



16 



L. B. Waltz, labor 

Lewis J. Casten, 

Frank J. Casten, 

Chas. J. Casten, 

Ludwik Krahel, 

F. H. Sweatland, 

Joseph Raboin. 

John Fusek, 

John Merrick, " v 

Eddie Kempiste, 

Michael Koycht, 

John Stokoski, 

John Seddak, 

Steve Omasta, 

Stan Zudoski, 

John Osley, 

Joseph Welsh. 

Ed. Kupozynski. 

John Sdanviwsyc, 

F. L. Betsold, and lumber 

John S. Lane & Son, crushed Stone 

Mass. Broken Stone Co., crushed stone 

B. & M. R. R. Co., freight on stone 

W. A. Clark Coal Co.. coal 

Kimball & Cary, 

Silas S. Dwjght, sand 

Kate Flynn, lighting lantern 

Kate Donovan, lighting lantern 

Chas W. Wade, tapping main 

N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R., demurrage, 1909 

David W. Lewis Co., tile 

A L. Smith, brick 

John L. Mather, mason work, 

George Eberlein, repairs 

Haydenville Co., repairs S. Roller 

City, of Northampton, dynamite and caps 

W..H. Riley & Co., tile 



£210 


62 


27 


75 


258 


62 


13 


50 


150 


20 


96 


63 


3 


00 


130 


95 


40 


25 


10 


50 


10 


50 


11 


00 


47 


00 


40 


25 


29 


75 


21 


00 


12 


25 


7 


00 


7 


00 


12 


55 


220 


90 


703 


26 


547 


13 


53 


48 


36 


68 


4 


20 


10 


00 


10 


00 


8 


50 


34 


00 


80 


00 


16 


80 


11 


25 


4 


70 


2 


00 


4 


80 


16 


06 



17 



Shumway & Riley, supplies 
Chas. Millars & Sons Co., iron pipe 
B. & M* R. R. Co., demurrage 
Emma D. Webber, fence posts 
A. L. Strong, fencing and posts 
Merrick Lumber Co., lumber 



Received from State Highway Commission 



$ 13 


52 


49 


68 


1 


00 


16 


25 


41 


25 


35 


85 


$8,975 59 


$9,917 


20 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES. 



Miss Lulu L. Rurbank, 


teaching 


$143 00 


Edith L. Leland, 


' ' 




143 00 


Ethel P. Moore, 


i i 




144 96 


C. Mabel Barton, 


' * 




143 00 


Mary J. Mulcahy, 


' ' 




384 62 


Sarah V. Kiley, 


' ' 




383 50 


Mary Decker, 


' ' 




407 00 


Kate E. Murray, 


1 ' 




130 00 


Katherine W. Day, 


' ' 




407 00 


Margaret A. Ryan, 


' ' 




407 00 


Hazel C. Owen, 


' ' 




220 00 


Elizabeth A. Coffin, 


' ' 




220 00 


Christine Hibbard, 


' ' 




220 00 


Nellie T. O'Brien, 


' ' 




220 00 


Constance C. Breor, 


' ' 




190 00 


Charlotte Woods, 


i i 


music 


153 00. 


Lucille Gravestein, 


* ' 


drawing 


80 00 


Beatrice J. Hibbard, 


" 


" 


93 50 


M. H. Bowman, service as Supt. 




545 64 


M. H. Bowman, transportation tickets 


75 60 


M.-H. Bowman, supplies 


and expenses 


28 80 


Milton Bradley Co., 


books 


and supplies 


22 20 


J. L. Hammett & Co., 


i i 


. « i 


161 72 


Ginn & Co. 


( < ■ ■ 


..'•_■'■" ( ( ;. 


74 18 


American Book Co., 


s < 




.5 6D : 



18 



Houghton Mifflin Co., books and supplies 


$14 60 


Silver Burdett & Co., 


93 21 


E. E. Babb & Co., 


43 15 


Masury Young & Co., 


36 00 


F. M. Crittenden, 


6 00 


C. N. Fitts Co., 


17 40 


H. D. Smith, coal 


325 19 


F. T. Bardwelh wood 


31 50 


Charles D. Flynn, janitor 


94 05 


John Salvas 


94 85 


Scott Harris, 


144 00 


S. G, Hubbard, 


36 00 


A. L. Carl, 


53 40 


R. Douyard, 


4 40 


Mrs. A. Hilbert. and sweeping 


64 00 


Celestine Wright, 


1 25 


Kate Wickles-, 


9 50 


Cornelia Wickles, 


30 00 


Margaret Wisaway, 


4 00 


Kate W. Day, 


8 50 


Amelia Wlosycn, cleaning 


6 00 


Mrs. John Merrick, 


3 00 


Mrs. Kate Flynn, 


8 20 


Wm. P. Boyle, painting and labor 


196 38 


Shumway & Riley, plumbing 


83 19 


W. H. Riley & Co., 


675 00 


Victor E. Harris, 


1 40 


Merrick Lumber Co., lumber 


19 66 


Thaddeus Graves Jr., labor and supplies 


7 00 


W. G. Parks, books 


1 84 


Arthur R. Breor, taking census and supplies, labor 


30 84 


John J. Betsold, labor and expenses 


24 19 


Frank L. Betsold, labor 


5 50 


Merrill Strong, transporting scholars 


2 00 


Foster Bros. ; supplies 


3 00 


M. J. Ryan, 


6 65 


J. H. Howard, '' 


, 2 35 



19 



Fred W. Schepp, labor 
O. Belden & Sons, 
A. L. Strong, wood 



$ 2 


50 


10 


00 


15 


00 


$7,218 


12 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS. 

Chas A. Byrne, school inspection, 1909 
A. J. Bonneville, 



$50 00 
50 00 

$100 00 



BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS. 



Wm. M. Cochran, bonds, Treasurer 
Wm. M. Cochran, bonds, Collector 



$32 00 
25 00 

$57 00 



MEMORIAL BUILDING. 



Hatfield Gas Co., gas 


$ 41 94 


Thos. J. Ryan, labor on walk and sewer 


12 00 


Eddie Kempiste, 


2 25 


L. B. Waltz, 


7 00 


Michael Koycht, 


3 00 


J. E. Sheehan, 


7 00 


John Merrick, 


1 75 


F. A. Sweatland, 


7 00 


Ernest Godin, team 


2 25 


Michael Duleska, 


3 00 


H. D. Smith, coal 


52 87 


L. H. Kingsley, janitor 


75 00 


James P. Ryan, closet, lavatory, plumbing 


102 44 


Wm". P. Boyle, painting and gas fixtures 


131 28 


C N. Fitts Co., shades 


8 24 



20 

C. I. Stowell, cement $ 50 

M.J. Ryan, burners and supplies 6 10 

W. H. Riley &. Co., gas pipe for Library 3 47 



TOWN HALL. 

Thos. J. Ryan, labor putting- in water 

Eddie Kempiste 

Michael Koycht, 

F. W. Schepp. 

Victor E. Harris, plumbing 

C. W. Wade, tapping water mam 

A. L. Strong wood 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

R. F. Wells, history of Hatfield, 

Ernest Godin, use of team, 

J. H. Howard, 

Wm. G. Atkins, supplies, 

Chauncey Graves, Roosevelt's book, 

Lewis Historical Pub. Co., books, 

Bridgman & Lyman, books, 

M. E. Hancock, pictures, 

F. G. Harlow Co., supplies, 

C- M. Barton, services as Librarian, 
Wednesday openings, 
Books to stations, 
Catalogueing books, 
Repairing books, 
Miscellaneous, items,: ,. ... 



$467 09 



$ 9., 


00 


1 


50 


i 


50 


5 


00 


11 


84 


10 


50 


10 


00 



$49 34 



$ 5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


75 


2 


25 


2 


00 


25 


00 


105 


33 


11 


01 


19 


50 


75 


00 


21 


50 


: ?9.: 


;■:}'&' 


43- 


*22: 


12 


60 


•■•• 1 


69 



$350,00 



21 

RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN 

State Aid, . $ 76 00 

Poor Expenditures, 881 65 

Sewers — Elm and School Streets, 724 97 

Water Rates, 500 00 

Street Lights, 1727 00 

Insurance, 153 75 

Smith Academy, l000 00 

Cemeteries, 100 00 

Town Officers, 1521 00 

North Street Sidewalk, 141 62 

Schools, 7218 12 

Highways and Bridges, 2097 93 

Public Library, 350 00 

Muster Day, 75 00 

Smith Industrial School ' 335 00 

Fire Department, 284 41 

Contingencies, _ 90l 41 

Memorial Day, 75 00 

School Physicians, 100 00 

Bonds— Town Officers, > . 57 00 

Memorial Building, 467 09 

Town Hall, ' 49 34 

State Road, 8975 59 



$27,811 88 



LIST OF APPROPRIATIONS VOTED TO BE RAISED 
AT THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Held March 21, 1910 

For Memorial Day, $ 75 00 

Care of Cemeteries, 100 00 • 

Public Library, 350 00 

Teacher of Music, 150 00 



22 



For Teacher of Drawing, $ 150 00 

Fireman's Muster, 75 00 

School Physician, 100 00 

Street Lights— already installed, 1400 00 

Tuition— Smith Academy, 1000 00 

Sewer— School Street, 350 00 

Draining North Street, l0> 00 

Water Rates, . 500 00 

Repairing Sewer on Elm Street, 500 00 

Salaries— Town Officers, 1400 00 

Bonds— Town Officers, 50 00 

Debt—Depot Road Note, 1000 00 

Contingencies, 800 00 

Interest, 400 00 

Insurance, 150 00 

Care— Memorial Hall, 150 00 

Repairs— Memorial Hall 400 00 
Highways and Bridges — Ordinary, 2000 00 

Fire Apparatus, 150 00 

Hose Wagon, 125 00 

Sidewalk— North Street, 150 00 

Water into Town Hall, 35 00 

Drainage— Town Hall, 25 00 

Care of Poor, lC00 00 
Maintenance of Schools—repairs 

buildings; 5600 00 
Street Lights— -Prospect, Chestnut 

and Bradstreet. . 666 00 



$18,951 00 

JOHN C. RYAN, 

C. EDWARD WARNER, 

THOMAS J. RYAN, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 

I have examined the books of the Selectmen and find 
them correct. 

C. K. MORTON, Auditor. 



23 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD, 1911 = 



Name 

Anable, John G. 
Boyle, William E. 
Boyle, James L. 
Boyle, William P. 
Billings, G. Raymond 
Brennan, Thomas J. 
Crafts, Edson S. 
Chandler, George A. 
Dickinson, Edward N 
Graves, Thaddeus Jr. 
Graves, Archie P. 
Jubenville, Eugene 
Kiley, Michael P, 
Kiley, John W. 
Morton, Gilbert E. 
Newman, Joseph S 
O'Dea, Thomas M. 
Proulx, Larkin M. 
Ryan, Thomas W. 
Ryan, Matthew J. 
Shattuck, Charles S. 
Stowell, Charles I. 
Vollinger, Frank G. 
Wade; Charles W. 
Warner, Charles L. 



Occupation 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Painter 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Carpenter 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Clerk 

Merchant 

Manufacturer 

Sexton 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 

DR. 



ce in Treasury, 


$ 1101 49 


-eceived from E- L. Graves, coll. (1909), 


4416 20 


" (1910), 


20,225 72 


Treas. Water Commissioners, 


2900 00 


District Court fines 1 


90 00 


Auctioneer's license, 


1 00 


Pool license, 


2 00 


Slaughter licenses, 


3 00 


Refunding of dog fund, 


131 27 


Rent of Town Hall, 


34 00 


City of Northampton, tuition, 


315 00 


City of Boston, tuition, 


25 00 


Joseph Schepp, cemetery plot, 


50 


State, Corporation Tax, 


201 41 


National Bank Tax, 


842 61 


State Aid, 


72 00 


Tuition, 


11 00 


Income Mass. school fund, 780 73 


Supt. of Schools, 


462 96 


Inspection of Animals, 


32 00 


Tuition of Industrial School, 185 00 


Board of Charity, 


2 55 


Mass. Highway Com., 


9917 20 



25 



To cash r 



eceived from Merrick Lumber Co., by error, 


$19 66 


J. A. Sullivan, bags, 




6 60 


Sale of wheelbarrow. 




1 00 


John C. Ryan, tile and plank, 




4 25 


L. H. Kingsley, tile, 




43 48 


John M. Strong-, tile, 




9 50 


D. P. Sheehan, lumber, 




6 50 


M. J. Ryan, Agt., sidewalk assess 


, 53 65 


George Saffer, 




45 45 


John Furtsch, 




41 44 


Emma A. Waite, 




29 90 


Wm. H. Dickinson, Est., tile, 


' ' 


145 19 


C. A. Byrne, tile and sewer assess. 


, 75 00 


" F. H. Bardwell, 




43 28 


A. Douglas, " • 




46 78 


L. J. Pelissier, 




89 98 


Ros Billings, 




33 00 


Fred Wensel, sale of tile, 




7 87 


Jas. L. Boyle, sale of brick, 




4 20 


John. J. Betsold, supplies sold, 




10 69 




$42,470 06 



TO CASH RECEIVED FROM TEMPORARY LOANS 

North. Ins. for Savings, 6 mo. Note, $ 7000 00 

6 mo. Note. 10,000 00 $17,000 00 



CR 



$59,470 06 



By cash paid Selectmen's order, $27,811 88 

Interest on Water Bonds, 2000 00 
District Court fees, 118 05 

Interest on temporary loans, 472 22 
Interest on outstanding loans, 33 33 



26 



By cash paid County Tax, 


$ 2434 67 


State Tax, 


2058 40 


Treas. Sinking Fund, 


861 67 


Balance in Treasury, 


1602 32 




— : $37,392 54 



BY CASH PAID TEMPORARY AND OUTSTANDING 

LOANS 

f 
Northampton Inst, for Savings, note, $3000 00 

note, 7000 00 

note, 10,000 00 

Depot Road Note, 1000 00 

Demand Note, 150 00 

Sinking- Fund Note, 927 52 $22,077 52 



$59,470 06 



IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 
1909 TAXES. 



DR, 



To cash received, $4416 20 

To Assessors' Orders of Abatements, 55 70 



$4471 90 



CR, 



By Uncollected Taxes, 
Interest on Taxes, 
Addition to Warrant, 



$4334 95 

119 30 

17 65 



$4471 90 



27 

1910 TAXES 

DR. 

To cash received, $20,225 72 

Uncollected Taxes, 3349 88 

Discount on Taxes, 395 30 

— — $23,970 90 

DR. 

By Assessors' Warrant, $23,272 43 

Addition to Warrant, 653 72 

Interest collected, 44 75 

r- $23,970 90 

I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collector and 
find that he has been credited by the Treasurer with the 
amount of $4416.20 of taxes of 1909, and $20,225.72 of the 
taxes of 1910. 

CHARLES K. MORTON, Auditor. 

Hatfield, March 7, 1911. 



28 

WATER SINKING FUND. 

DR. 

To 30 years 4 per cent. Water Bonds, 150,000 00 

CR. 
By Sinking Fund, $16,009 61 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 



DR. 

To Notes Outstanding, 

Bills due March 1st, not in, 

CR. 

By Uncollected Taxes, 1910, 
Due from State Aid, 

Inspection of animals, 
State, Smith School, 
Sale of tile, 
Sewer assessment, 
Sidewalk assessment, 

Balance in Treasury, 

Balance in favor of town, 



$ 000 00 
455 20 



$3349 88 




76 00 




32 50 




167 50 




18 33 




330 00 




461 22 




1602 32 






$6037 75 






$5582 55 



I have examined the books and accounts of the Treasurer 
of the Town of Hatfield for the year ending Feb. 28, 1911. I 
find Selectmen's orders on file to the amount of Twenty-Seven 
Thousand Eight Hundred Eleven and Eighty-Eight One 



29 

Hundreds Dollars .27.811 88; with evidence of their pay- 
ments by him. 

Also cancelled notes and receipts for State and County 
taxes and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the Treasury of one Thousand Six 
Hundred and Two and Thirty-Two One Hundreds Dollars. 
(1602.32). 

CHARLES K. MORTON, Auditor. 

Hatfield. March 8. 1911. 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the fifteeth 
annual report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows: — 

Balance of cash from last year's account $ 47 72 
Cash from collection of water rates 4,178 49 

Connections and supplies furnished 100 82 



$4,827 0; 



We have paid the past year as follows: — 

Town of Hatfield, water rates 
W. H. Riley & Co., supplies 
Gazette Printing Co., bill heads 
Edward A. Ryan, claim for damages 
Northampton Water Works, supplies 
Charles Miller & Son Co., pipe and specials 
City of Holyoke, specials 
Boston & Main Railroad, 
Rupert D. Graves, pipe and supplies 
O'Connor, Hebert & Davies, labor and material 
Charles W. Wade, labor and cash paid 
Charles W. Wade, collector of water rates 
M.J. Proulx, labor and cash paid 
Norwood Engineering Co , services boxes 
Western Union Tel. Co., telegram 
Ellis & Fad Mfg. Co., pipe cutter 



$2,900 00 


99 


93 


7 


00 


130 


00 


11 


50 


138 


99 


4 


93 


17 


93 


81 


81 


54 


87 


36 


05 


125 


35 


128 


40 


5 


70 




67 


25 


60 



31 

D. W. Wells, cartage of old pipe $ 1 25 

Balance, cash on hand 557 15 



$4,327 03 



There are now 330 connections with private property, 90 
hydrants for fire protection, 5 water tanks and water in 5 
school houses and in Memorial Hall. 

A machine for cutting the pipe mains has been purchased 
at a cost of $25. 60; and there is now on hand, 6 inch pipe 
worth $120, and 1 inch galvanized iron pipe worth $15. 

CHARLES L. WARNER ) Hatfield 
DANIEL W. WELLS \ Water 

M. J. PROULX J Commissioners 

I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the Town of Hatfield 
and have found them correct with vouchers on file for all 
payments made. 

CHARLES K. MORTON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 1, 1011. 



Sinking: Fund Commissioners 
Report. 



We have the following amount deposited to the credit of 
the sinking fund. 

Florence Savings Bank, $1,062 08 

Haydenville Savings Bank, 437 64 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, 1,061 08 

Easthampton Savings Bank 608 43 

Northampton Institution for Savings, 981 90 

Union Trust Co., Springfield 1,998 48 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, 940 00 

Springfield Institution for Savings, 920 00 

Boston & Main R. R. Bonds, 3,000 00 

Springfield Street Railway Bonds, 1,000 00 

N. Y.N, H. & H. R. R. Bonds, 2,000 00 

Town of Hatfield Water Bonds, 2,000 00 



$16,009 61 

M. J. RYAN ) Sinking 

E. S. WARNER \ Fund 

L.J. PELISSIER J Commissioners 

I have examined the accounts of the Sinking Fund 
Commissoners of the town of Hatfield and find in their 
possession securities amounting to sixteen thousand and nine 
and 61—100 ($16,009.61) dollars. 

CHARLES K. MORTON, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 4, 1911. 



Town Clerk's Report. 



The vital statistics for the Town of Hatfield for the year 
1.910, are as follows: — 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total 



No. 


Males 


Females 


4 


3 


1 


2 





2 


9 


3 


6 


2 


1 


1 


15 


8 


7 


5 


4 


1 


7 


4 


3 


1 1 


7 


4 


5 


2 


3 


7 


5 


2 


6 


3 


3 


6 


2 


4 



79 



42 



37 



BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS. 



Born in Canada 

United States 

Poland 

Germany 



Father 


Mother 


1 


1 


20 


21 


47 


. 47 


1 






34 



Hungary 
Ireland 



Father 


Mother 


9 


10 


1 






79 ' 79 



BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS. 
1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 



64 68 67 92 61 

MARRIAGES BY MONTHS. 

No- 

January 3 

February • 1 

March 1 

April 2 

May 1 

June 2 

September 3 

October 1 

November 8 

December 4 



26 



First marriage of both parties 23 

Second marriage of -g*oom, 'first £>f.-vbritie-: V .-. . i: 1 

Third marriage of groom, first of bride 1 

'Sec'oi-M marriage Of groom, second of bride 1 

The oldest and youngest grooms were seventy- and twenty 
years of age respectively. '■ ■'-; 

. *The oldest and youngest brides were fifty-five^ and eigh- 
teen years of age respectively. 



35 



BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED. 



Born in United States 
Poland 
Hungary 
England 



Groom 


Bride 


16 


17 


8 


6 


2 


2 





1 



26 



26 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS. 
1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 



30 



32 



33 



21 



33 



DEATHS BY MONTHS. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



No. 


Males 


Females 


1 





1 


4 


1 


3 


4 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 





2 


2 


o : 


3 


2 


i 


* 1 - 





i 


o 


3 





4 


2 


2 











3 


2 


1 



28 



17 



11 



5 


10 


10 


20 


20 


30 


30 


40 


40 


50 


50 


60 


60 


70 


70 


80 


80 


90 


90 


100 



36 

No. Males Females 

Under 1 year of age 10 5 5 

Between 1 and 5 years 



1 1 

2 2 
110 
2 2 
2 11 

2 11 

3 2 1 

4 1 3 
110 

28 17 11 

Age of oldest person deceased, (male) 90 years 1 month 
1 day. 

CAUSES OF DEATH. 

Classified according to the nomenclature adopted by the 
State Board of Registration. 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES 

Malarial Fever, 1 

Cholera-Infantum, 1 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES 

Tuberculosis 2 

Hyperpyrexia 1 

Monstrosity 1 

Exhaustion 1 

Infantile Debility 1 

Premature Birth 1 

Still Born 1 

Senility 2 

Indigestion 1 



37 



LOCAL DISEASES. 



Dysentry 
Apoplexy 
Pneumonia 
Heart Disease 
Whooping Cough 
Entveitis 



VIOLENT DEATHS 



Burned to death — accidental 
Drowned — accidental 
Struck by train — accidental 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED, 



28 



Annie Pelc 
Bridget McGrath 
Joseph Sadowski 
Peter Mazukazits 
Alpheus Cowles 
Stephen Bucalo 
Leon Zarenski 
Alice Margaret Walsh 
James Breor 
Rhoda W. Hubbard 
Pricilia C. Graves 
Margaret Kiley 
John F. Steele 
David B. Curtis 



Mary Walsh Ryan 
Maria Louise Morton 
John Brennan 
Mary C. Allaire 
Leon Zagrodnik 
Daniel J. Coffey 
Yana Kosakoski 
Stephen Vochula 
Semenns Broveausnknoir 
Samuel Osley 
Peter Balise, Sr. 
Antoine Glinianawitz 
Matilda N. Porter 



; 38 
DOG LICENSES. 



The number of dogs licensed during- the year ending- 
November 30, 1910, with the receipts and settlements of the 
account with the County Treasurer is as follows:— 



74 Male Dogs at $2.00 each 
7 Female Dogs at $5.00 each 



Less fees, 81 dogs at 20 cents each. 
Paid to County Treasurer $166 80 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Town Clerk. 



$148 00 
35 00 






$183 00 
16 20 



Assessors' Report. 



Value of assessed personal estate $ 395,693 00 
Value of assessed real estate 1,132,210 00 



Total value of assessed estate 






• ;.$! 


,527.903 00 


Value of assessed buildings 

Value of assessed land 

\ 




$647,264 
484,946 


00 
00 








$1,132,210 00 


No. Male polls assessed 
No. Residents assessed 
All others 








559 
331 
41 










372 


No. of non-residents assessed on 
All others 


property 




49 
39 










88 


No. of persons assessed on property 
For poll tax only 






460 
300 










760 


Rate of total tax per $1000 
No. of horses assessed 
No. of cows 
No. of neat cattle 








$14 50 

460 

293 

81 



40 



No. of swine 




16 


No. of fowls 




556 


No. of dwelling houses 




340 


No. of acres of land 




9,258 


State Tax 


$ 2,058 40 




County Tax 


2434 67 




Town Tax 


17,951 00 




Overlayings 


828 36 








$23,272 43 


Estimated Bank and Corporation Tax 


1,000 oo 


Conn. Valley Street Railw 


ay Co. excise tax 


649 72 



Value of property "exempt from taxation, Chapter 490, 
Section 5, Acts of 1909. 

Literary Institutions $70,368 00 

Church property 27,000 00 



$97,368 00 



Respectfully submitted, 

EDSON W. STRONG 1 Assessors 
WM. H. BELDEN > of 

L. H. KINGS LEY J Hatfield 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HATFIELD 



MASSACHUSETTS 



FOR THE 



Year Ending March 1, 1911 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

John J. Betsold, Chairman, 1911 

Thaddens Graves, Jr., Sec.,' 1912' ' '' '" ^ r " 
A. R. Breor, 1913 

M. H. Bowman, Superintendent 



Truant Officers 

S. W. Kingsley and A. L. Strong- 
Authorized to sign Certificates for children between the 
ages of 14 and 16. 

M. H. Bowman 



School Census September 1, 1910 

No. of boys between the ages of 5 and 15 _ 151 

No. of girls between the ages of 5 and 15 131 

Total ! 282 

No. of boys between the ages of 7 and 14 92 

No. of girls between the ages of 7 and 14 92 

Total . . 184 

No. of male illiterate minors over 14 years of age, none. 
No. of female illiterate minors over 14 years of age, none. 



44 





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West Grammar 

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West Brook Grammar . . . 

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Bradstreet . . . 



Report of School Committee 



During the past year many improvements have been 
made. In our Center school we have done away with our 
out buildings and established them inside of our school build- 
ing and connected with the sewer, we have also had new 
traps attached to the set bowls that was put in last year and 
good ventilation has been established. We "have also laid a 
cement floor through the entrance to the ninth grade room, 
so we have this building in pretty good standing at present 
and wish even 7 father and mother that have any children at- 
tending this school should feel proud of it. 

We have also made the following repairs on the hill 
school house on account of some sickness that prevailed last 
spring, we had the building all gone over with a new coat of 
paint, and the walls all gone over with a coat of light paint 
as well as all the seats and desks and the building well 
cleaned, we also destroyed all the books and papers in the 
building and stocked the building with new stock. We have 
also applied No Duster on all our school floors with good 
results, We- also had the buildings at West Hatfield and 
North Hatfield and Bradstreet gone over inside with a light 
coat of paint, so we feel that our schools are in fair standing 
at present. Every building has been thoroughly cleaned at 
every beginning of the school term, these and many other 
minor repairs show to some extent what has been done the 
past year, we also feel that all our schools that can be con- 
nected with the sewer should be as soon as possible. 

JOHN J. BETSOLD, Chairman. 



48 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENT, 

RESOURCES. . 



Town appropriation $5,900 00 

Supt. of Schools 462 90 

Income Mass. School Fund 780 73 

City of Northampton, Tuition 147 00 

Supplies sold 10 69 



$7,301 38 

Ofders drawn on Treasurer 7,218 12 



Superintendent's Report 



To the School Committee of Hatfield: - 

Agreeable to your custom and regulation I have the honor 
of presenting to you my report for the current year. The ob- 
ject of this and other similar reports is to keep the public in 
close touch with the work and progress of the schools. The 
past year has not been marked by any special emphasis 
having been placed upon some one department or division of 
School work. From year to year we have spoken of advance- 
ment having been made. From this- it might be inferred that 
years since the public schools ought to have reached the. goal 
of perfection. But no such high claim can be made. It is a 
well established fact that yearly progress is being made. But 
it is also equally evident . that new difficulties arise; new 
problems present themselves; and special claims push to the 
front. Furthermore, when no other department of civic life 
has the courage and determination to grappel with some 
human puzzle, in some form that is given to the schools to 
solve. At present, we must meet and so far as possible 
determine the best solution of the agricultural problem, the 
mill problem, the economic problem the rural contentment 
problem and physical problem. Candid reflection will lead to 
the conclusion that it is a wonder that the schools can and 
do accomplish so much. If w r e conceed that the aim of all 
educational effort is to most quickly and fully overcome all 
the obstacles that each member of humanity meets, then, the 
best and fullest development of the individual pupil, without 
regard to number of pages covered or rank attained, is the 
most rapid progress. By this we mean the growth in self re- 



50 

liance, in courage, in mental fiber. On the above basis the 
schools have done a year of progressive work. 

It is a subject of gratitute that another school year has 
Passed without any widespread illness among the school 
chidren. While there have been cases of contagious disease 
yet they have been so promptl}' issolated by the school physi- 
cian, and so carefully attended at home that no very serious 
interruption of school work has occurred. 

Each year the buildings where the children spend most of 
their hours of study are being modernized and rendered more 
sanitary. The changes that have been made the past year 
contribute largely to the comfort, cleanliness, morality and 
dignity of school life The demand for better conditions in 
other school buildings of the town are well known, and de- 
finite action will be taken year by year for the correction of 
their faults. 

The success of the schools the past year is due to the 
•harmonious co-operation of teachers, supervisors, superinten- 
dent and school committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MORTIMER H. BOWMAN, 

Superintendent of Schools. 
February 1, 1911. 



Report of Supervisor of Music 



Mr. M. H. Bowman, Superintendent of Schools. 

I submit this brief report regarding- the department of 
vocal music in the schools of Hatfield: — 

The faithful work and co-operation of the teachers have 
been an inspiration and they all with no exception have en- 
deavered earnestly. We owe them much thanks and com- 
mendation for their diligence. The children too have showed 
enthusiasm and interest which is gratifying to any teacner 
and makes instruction a pleasure. 

The work has been conducted along the same lines as 
formerly. It includes songs, graded to the proficiency of the 
pupils, individual work, sight singing and written drill. 

Respectfully, 
CHARLOTTE WOODS, 

Supervisor of Music, 



Report of Supervisor of Drawing; 



Mr. M. H. Bowman ^ Superintendent of Schools-. 

In making out niy outline of work in drawing it has 
been my endeavor to introduce those things which will most 
interest and help the pupils in the schools and which they 
will retain and make practical use of iu their lives. 

In the primary grades it is difficult to teach the children 
set principles belonging to art education. Therefore simple 
little studies in observation of things around us and in touch 
with us have been given them. 

In the intermediate grades the children become old 
enough to understand somewhat that in correct representation 
of objects and our surrounding certain principles must be ad- 
hered to. Therefore objects in perspective, the figure in action 
and' right proportions, color harmony, and design with its 
practical application have all been brought before the scholars 
and in an interesting manner. 

This same line of work is carried on in the grammar 
grades but with much more detail and with a greater idea of 
its practical use in daily life. 

In order to bring this about more construction work of 
different kinds has been planned, with original designs from 
various motives and good color schemes applied. 

It is my desire to express gratitude for the deep interest 
taken by the grade teachers in the work of drawing and the 
children have certainly done well by means of their co-opera- 
tion. 

Also I wish to mention the fact that through the interest 
and in conference with, the superintendent all mediums that 
have been necessary for the work, such as water colors which 



m 



the children greatly enjoy, have been readily supplied, and 
material as well for the construction of certain problems... 



Respectfully submitted, 
• -BEATRICE J. HIBBARD, 

Supervisor of Drawing [ 



54 



April 3, 


1911 


19, 


< i 


May 29, 


' ' ■ • 


, 30, 


' ' ■ 


June 16, 


" 


Sept. 6, 
Nov. 29, Dec. 3, 


Dec. 22, 


" 


Jan. 8, 


1912 


Feb. 21, 


; ' 


22 


' ' 


March 15, 


' ' 


April 1, 
19, 


<< 


May 29, 
30, 


i i 

c i 


June 14, 


i ' 



^SCHOOL CALENDAR. •"" 

Schools open 
Patriots' Day, holiday 
".Patriotic exercises 
Memorial Day, holiday 
Schools close 
Schools open 

Thanksgiving- recess 
Schools close 
Schools open 
Patriotic exercises 
Washington's Birthday, holiday 
Schools close 
Schools open 
Patriots' Day, holiday 
Patriotic exercises 
Memorial Day, holiday 
Schools close 



RESIGNATIONS AND TRANSFERS. 



Hill Primary, Mable C. Barton 

West Grammar, Edith Leland 

West Primary, Lulu L. Burbank 

West Brook Grammar, Katherine E. Murray 

West Brook Primary, Mary Decker transferred to Hill Primary 

Bradstreet, Ethel P. Moore 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 




Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending March 1, 1912 



HERALD JOB PRINT 
NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 



Finance Committee 



To the Voters of the Town of Hatfield : 

Gentlemen : — Your Finance Committee submit the fol- 
lowing report : 

We have carefully considered the calls for appropriations 
from the various town departments, and have held one public 
meeting. As the tax rate for the last year has been very 
burdensome, we have endeavored to keep this year's within 
bounds. 

The following appropriations, which we recommend 
without additions, can be had with a fifteen ($15) dollar tax 
rate; also, we beg to state that each $1600 appropriated above 
these recommendations means $1.00 added to your tax rate. 



WE RECOMMEND 



Article 5. Highways. 

' All ordinary repairs on highways 

and bridges, $1500 00 

Unfinished work at Bradstreet Fill, 600 <'0 
All extra work on highways, 500 00 

Repairs on sewers, 100 00 

■ $2700 00 



Article 6. 


Necessary Town Expenses. 




Contingencies, 


$800 00 


Care Memorial Building, 


150 00 


Bonds Town Officers, 


50 00 


Schools, 


6100 00 


Electric Lights — already installed, 


3200 00 


Water Rates, 


500 00 


Salaries Town Officers, 


1400 00 


Insurance, 


200 00 


Interest, 


350 00 






<|»-( c\ rrf/\ /\rv 






$1_Z, iOU UU 


Article 8. 


Memorial Day, 


75 00 


Article 9. 


Town Poor, 


800 00 


Article 11. 


Care of Cemeteries, 


100 00 


Article 12. 


Public Library, 


350 00 


Article 13. 


For School Supervisors, 


300 00 


Article 14. 


Tuition Smith Academy, 


1000 00 


Article 15. 


Firemen's Muster, 


75 00 


Article 17. 


School Physicians, 


100 00 


Article 19. 


Sidewalk Repairs, School St. 


500 00 


Article 20. 


Fire Escapes, repairs, school buildings, 500 00 


Article 21. 


Permanent Road, Maple street, 1500 00 


Article 23. 


Permanent Road, Elm street, 


1500 00 




$22,400 00 



Article 22. That the Selectmen be given power to sell the 
outlying meadow land, (the proceeds to be reserved as a 
fund for the improvement of Home property), and 
instructed to raze the buildings on Main street, to the end 



that the town's people at some future time can have a 
playground or breathing spot. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John C. Ryan, Chairman. 
Oscar E. Belden, Secretary. 
Thomas J. Ryan, 
John J. Betsold, 
L. H. Kingsley, 
William E. Foley, 
Thaddeus Graves, Jr., 
John McHugh, Jr., 
Charles W. Wade, 
Daniel P. Sheehan, 
Carlton H. Crafts, 

Finance Committee. 



Articles in the Town Warrant for 
Town Meeting, March 18, 1912. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; one Assessor 
for three years; Town Treasurer; one School Committee for 
three years; one Water Commissioner for three years; one 
Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years; one Trustee for 
Public Library for three years; Auditor; Tree Warden; 
Elector under the W T ill of Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; six 
Constables; and to vote on the question — ''Yes'' or ,l No" — 
Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors 
in this town? All the foregoing to be voted for on one ballot. 

The polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon, 
and be kept open at least four hours, and for as much longer 
time as a majority of the voters present shall direct, but in no 
case shall they be kept open after the hour of sunset. 

Article 3. To hear the reports of the various town 
officers and act thereon. 

Article 4. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5. To take action in relation to maintenance and 
repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing year, and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 6. To take action in relation to raising money 
and appropriate same to defray the necessary expenses of the 
town for the ensuing year. 

6 



Article 7. To see what action the town will take in 
relation to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Article 8. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money foi Memorial Day. 

Article 9. To take action in relation to the support of 
the poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appropriate 
money for the same. 

Article 10. To revise and accept the list of Jurors re- 
ported by the Selectmen. 

Article 11. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the care of cemeteries for the ensuing year. 

Article 12. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money fot the Public Library for the ensuing year. 

Article 13. To see if the town will employ Supervisors 
in the public schools for the ensuing year, and raise and 
appropriate money for the same. 

Article 14. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children 
in Smith Academy, who are of suitable age and attainments 
to attend High School. 

Article 15. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 16. To see if the town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, or a majority there- 
of, to borrow during the current municipal year, beginning 
March 1st, 1912, in anticipation of the taxes for said munic- 
ipal year, such sums of money as may be necessary for the 
current expenses of the town, giving the notes of the town 
therefor, payable within one year from the dates thereof. 

Article 17. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the employment of one or more School Physicians, 
in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 502, Acts of 
1906. 



Article 18. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children attend- 
ing the Smith Industrial School of Northampton. 

Article 19. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for repairing the sidewalk on South side of School 
street. 

Article 20. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money to be expended in furnishing fire escapes and repairs 
for our school buildings. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to build a per- 
manent road of stone or other material, on Maple street, from 
Post Office corner, West to Kingsley's Bridge, and raise and 
appropriate money for the same. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to accept the 
Silas Porter property, (willed to the town by Samuel H. 
Dickinson) and what use and disposition will be made of 
same. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to build a per- 
manent road of stone or other material, on Elm street, com- 
mencing at end of present stone road, thence East, 1500 fees, 
and raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 24. To hear report of the Insurance Committee 
and act thereon. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to appoint an- 
other Finance Committee to act for the ensuing year. 

Article 26. To see what action, ir any, the town will 
take in regard to the proposition of all night street lighting 
submitted by the Amherst Gas Company. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to build a per- 
manent road of stone or other material, on Maple and Elm 
streets, or any part thereof, under the provisions of Chapter 
525, Acts of 1910, and raise and appropriate money for the 
same. 



Article 28. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
a sum of money sufficient to build a permanent road of stone 
or other material on the Depot Road, so-called, from the 
residence of John S Deinlein to the State Road in West 
Hatfield, or any part thereof. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to raise and ap- 
propriate money for purchasing any supplies or apparatus 
needed by the Fire Department, 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to build a gravel 
walk on West side of road South from Craft's Corner to 
school house in North Hatfield, and raise and appropriate 
money for the same. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to relay four 
inch pipe in place of the two inch water pipe from the L. S. 
Crafts' Corner, North to the Whately town line; also, from 
the Depot Road, North to the Dennis Reagan place, thereby 
giving them fire protection and better service, and raise and 
appropriate money for the same. 



Selectmen's Report. 



To the Citizens of Hatfield, Mass.: — 

Gent%emkn: — In accordance with the requirements of 
the Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for the 
year ending March 1st, 1912, is respectfully submitted. 

STATE AID 

Paid to three persons, $120 00 

POOR EXPENDITURES 

City of Northampton, 

John P. Chandler, wood, 

Silas Porter, rent, 

Aid, 

M. J. Ryan, supplies, 

Mary J. Proulx, rent, 

Lawyer Stevens, rent, 

A. J. Bonneville, med. attendance, 

H. D. Smith, coal, 

L. J. Pelissier, supplies, 



TOWN OFFICERS 



$116 00 


3 00 


45 00 


10 00 


189 70 


120 00 


25 00 


4 50 


9 00 


14 15 



$536 36 



John C. Ryan, 


services as Selectman, 1910, 


$150 00 


Thos. J. Ryan, 


1910, 


75 00 


C. Edw. Warner, 


1910, 


75 00 



IO 



11 



Chas. L. Warner, services Water Commissioner, 


$ 10 00 


Daniel W. Wells, 


« H < < 




10 00 


Michael J. Proulx, 


i ( ( ( ( 




10 00 


Daniel P. Sheehan, 


Ballot Clerk, 




2 00 


Larkin M. Proulx, 


< < i 




2 00 


ThaddeuS Graves, Jr. ' 


< < < 




2 00 


Scott Harris, 


< ( < 




2 00 


Chas. I. Stowell, 


< < t 




4 00 


Edw. J. Day, 


< < i 




2 00 


Edson W. Strong, 


t < < 




1 50 


Edson W. Strong, 


Assessors, 




77 50 


Wm. H. Belden, 


( i i 




113 76 


L. H. Kingsley, 


< < ( 




143 75 


E. L. Graves, 


' Tax Collector, 


19lt), 


200 00 


Chas. K. Morton, 


Elector, 




20 00 


Chas. K. Morton, 


Auditor, 




15 00 


L. B. Waltz, 


Constable, 




2 00 


Arthur R. Breor, 


School Committee, 


20 00 


Thos. W. Ryan, 


Registrar of Voters, 


10 00 


R. W. Weber, 


< < c 


( < 


10 00 


Sam'l F. Billings, 


< ( < 


i < 


10 00 


L. H. Kingsley, 


< t i 


< < 


10 00 


L. H. Kingsley, Town 


Clerk, Clerk Bd. Selectmen 


400 00 


L. H. Kingsley, Town 


Treasurer, 




100 00 


L. J. Pelissier, Fish W 


arden, 




5 00 




$1,482 50 



SEWERS 
North Main, Prospect, Elm and Maple Streets 
team and labor, 



John M. Strong, 
H. Shumway, 
John J. Betsold, 
Daniel P. Sheehan, 
Ed. A. Ryan, 
John C. Ryan, 



5 3 50 

5 00 

7 00 

36 00 

16 55 

2 00 



12 



Thos. J. Ryan, labor, 


$ 52 00 


John L, Sheehan, 


26 00 


L. B. Waltz, 


34 00 


John Merrick, 


20 12 


John Fusek, 


21 00 


Jacob Geies, 


14 00 


George Steele, 


1 50 


Frank J. Casten, 


19 25 


Geo. M. Franklin, 


1 75 


Wm. S. Mnrphy, 


10 50 


Peter Brainerd, 


3 50 


Tony Novack, 


5 25 


M. Paschek, " 


8 75 


Stefan Stickibi, 


8 75 


John Jablonski, 


7 00 


Frank Jablonski, 


1 75 


Frank Kousinkoski, 


3 50 


Martin Covill, 


5 25 


Mike Kulson, 


3 50 


John Blidr, " 


5 25 


Sebastien Blidr, 


87 


Kostanti Rogaleski, 


5 25 


Tony Penkosky, 


5 25 


Kietan Becker, 


1 75 


S. W. Kingsley, " 


13 95 


Cash, polish laborers, 


314 98 


David W. Lewis Co., tile, 


255 12 


B. & M. Rd., freight on tile, 


196 10 


Wm. A. Bailey, brick, 


34 00 


A. L. Smith, brick, 


6 80 


E. E. Davis, maps and surveys, 


24 98 


Northampton Iron Works, catch basins, 


72 00 



$1,253 72 



13 



CARE OF COMMONS 



James P. Kelly, raking and mowing, 

C. I. Stowell, 

H. D. Smith, lawn mower. 


$34 00 

10 00 

4 50 




$48 50 


MEMORIAL DAY 




Chas. K. Morton, 


$75 00 


SMITH INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 




Tuition, 


$200 00 


FIREMEN'S MUSTER 




M. J. Ryan, chief, 


$75 00 



ORDINARY REPAIRS— HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 



Daniel P. Sheehan, 
H. Shumway, 
Jos. S. Newman, 
James Mullins, 
Wm. E. Boyle, 
James L. Boyle, 
John C. Ryan, 
John M. Strong, 
John J. Betsold, 
H. D. Smith, 
Alex Donis, 
Whalen Bros., 
Mrs. C. L. Graves, 
Daniel W. Wells, 
James L. Day, 
F. H. Bardwell, 



team and labor 



$161 00 

397 62 

128 00 

12 00 

8 00 

4 00 
90 00 

8 12 

5 25 
70 19 

7 50 

6 00 
6 00 
2 00 

16 00 

9 50 



14 



D. P. McGrath, team and labor, 

Alex Kozash, 

A. W. Houghton, 

C. H. Crafts, 

Geo. M. Donelson, 

John F. Day, 

Chas. L. Warner, 

Thos. J. Ryan, labor 

L. B. Waltz, 

J. L. Sheehan, 

John Merrick, 

Geo. M. Franklin, 

John Fusek, 

Jacob Geies, 

Joseph Ryan, 

Tony Novak, 

Lucas Noreska, 

Martin Covill, 

Mike Paschek, 

Stefan Stickibi, 

Wm. S. Murphy, 

Frank Jablonski, 

Kietan Becker, 

F. J. Casten, 

Dennis Fitzgerald, 

Stefan Klemik, 

Tony Penkosky, 

Mike Kulson, 

John S. Denlein, 

Peter Sabisky, 

Lawrence Shoenisky, 

Peter Zablonski, 

John Dembroski, 

Geo. A. Chandler, 

A. H. Beers, surveying 

H. E. Bar dwell, paint, 

Chas. C. Lewis Co., wheelbarrows, 



$ 6 00 
13 00 

10 00 

35 25 
19 50 
18 00 

6 62 
274 00 

92 00 

79 00 

46 38 

57 75 

73 78 

84 28 

1 75 

1 75 

5 50 

3 50 

21 00 

36 16 
1 75 

1 75 

7 00 
17 25 

3 50 

2 62 
1 75 
1 75 

1 00 

8 75 
8 75 

2 63 
8 75 
5 00 

4 00 
8 75 

12 00 



15 



Foster Bros-, supplies, 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., repairs, 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 

L. J. Pelissier, twine, 

Wm. P. Boyle, painting fence, 

S. E- Briggs, filing saws, 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile, 

John L. Smith, edge, 

Frank E. Wilkie, sand, 

B. & M., freight, 

W. H. Riley & Co., repairs, 

Archie P. Graves, lumber, 

John Zerginsky, fence posts, 

M.J. Ryan, supplies, 

A. L. Strong, lumber, 

Edw. N. Dickinson, sand, 



$ 28 00 


14 


00 


29 


05 




55 


16 


95 


1 


25 


62 


33 


8 


00 


15 


00 




77 


5 


61 


301 


25 


6 00 


44 


15 


91 


64 


18 


50 


$2,556 46 



CHESTNUT STREET— SIDEWALK 



H. Shumway, team and labor, 

Daniel P. Sheehan, 

James Mullins, ' ' and sand, 

John C. Ryan, 

Jos. S. Newman, 

H. D. Smith, 

D. P. McGrath, 

Thos. J. Ryan, labor, 

L. B. Waltz, 

J. L. Sheehan, 

Jacob Geies, 

Geo. M. Franklin, 

John Fusek, 

John Merrick, " 

F. J. Casten, 

Wm. S. Murphy, 



$20 00 
12 00 

17 00 
37 20 

18 00 
4 00 
2 00 

16 00 

4 00 
12 00 

7 00 

5 25 
12 25 

5 25 
1 75 
5 25 



16 



Tony Novack, labor, 
John Jablonski, 
Frank Jablonski, 
Stefan Stickibi, 
Mike Paschek, 
Kietan Becker, 
Foster Bros., supplies, 
E. E. Davis, surveying, 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 



$ 1 


75 


3 


50 


3 


50 


3 


50 


5 


25 


5 


25 


8 


42 


4 48 



$214 60 



Chas. A. Byrne, 
A. J. Bonneville. 


school inspection, 1910, 
1910, 


$50 00 
50 00 




$100 00 




INSURANCE 




C. H. Pierce, 
H. L. Howard, 




$58 50 
98 25 



$156 75 



BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 



Win. M. Cochran, bond Treas., 
bond Coll., 



$32 00 
25 00 

$57 00 



STREET LIGHTING 
Amherst Gas Company, 



$2,520 32 



17 



SPECIAL REPAIRS— HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 



culvert, fill on plain, 

< < 

at underpass, 



H. Shumway, team and labor, Chestnut St., 

Jos. S. Newman, " 

Geo. M. Donelson, 

John C. Ryan, 

D. P, Sheehan, 

J. J. Betsold, 

Wm. R. Cutter, 

Jacob Geies, 

John Fusek, 

Geo. M. Franklin, 

Paul Michalicka, 

John Dembroski, 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co. 

L. H. Kingsley, sand, 

B. & M. Rd., car cinders, 
J. S. Lane & Son, stone, 

H. E. Bard well, paint, Pine Bridge, 

Wm. P. Boyle, painting, 

John C. Ryan, team and labor, repairs Brads' t Rd, 

Belden Bros, 

Frank P. Jones, 

Geo. M. Donelson, 

John J . Betsold, 

Archie P. Graves, 

D. P. Sheehan, 

H. Shumway, 

John F. Day, 

C. H. Crafts, 
Thos. J. Ryan, 
L. B. Waltz, 
J. L. Sheehan, 
Jacob Geies, 
John Fusek, 
John Dembroski, 
Geo. B. McClellan, gravel, 



$ 2 00 



12 00 


6 00 


6 00 


1 13 


4 00 


6 00 


5 25 


1 75 


5 25 


5 25 


5 25 


62 56 


7 50 


12 00 


94 20 


35 00 


54 59 


24 00 


12 00 


12 00 


24 00 


24-00 


24 00 


24 CO 


4 00 


24 00 


20 00 


24 00 


12 00 
12 00 
10 50 
10 50 
10 50 
16 70 



$613 92 



18 



MEMORIAL BUILDING 



H. D Smith, coal, 

L. H. Kingsley, janitor, 

A. L. Strong, wood, 

O'Connor & Davies, plumbing, 



WATER RATES 
Superintendent, 

CEMETERY APPROPRIATION 
F. H. Bardwell, Treas., 

SMITH ACADEMY 
David Billings, Treas., 

PERMANENT ROADS 



Elm, Prospect and Main Streets 



H, Shumway, 
H. D. Smith, 
Whalen Bros, 
P. T. Boyle, 
Joseph S. Newman, 
Daniel P. Sheehan, 
Michael W. Boyle, 
Dennis P. McGrath, 
Mrs. C. L. Graves, 
James L. Day, 
John J. Betsold, 
John M. Strong, 



team and labor, 



and coal, 



69 


39 


75 


00 


5 


50 


9 


24 



$159 13 



$500 00 



$100 00 



$1,000 00 



$319 50 
273 21 
107 00 

18 00 
219 00 
188 00 

13 00 
143 00 

41 00 
136 00 
160 00 

99 00 



19 



A. W. Morton, team and labor, 

Daniel W. Wells, 

A. W. Houghton, 

John C. Ryan, 

Geo. M. Donelson, 

John W. Kiley, 

F. H. Bardwell. 

John F. Day, 

Alfred E. Breor, 

Alex. Kozash, 

Mrs. Stephen Vachula, 

Thos. J. Ryan, supt., 

Lawrence W. Waltz, 

John L. Sheehan, 

Frank J. Casten, 

Jacob Geies, 

Geo. M. Franklin, 

John Fusek, 

John Merrick, 

Dennis Fitzgerald, 

Stefan Stickibi, 

Michael Paschek, 

Anthony Penkosky, 

Stefan Klemik, 

Joseph Smith* 

No. 2, 

George Fusek, sand, 

Alvin L. Strong, fence posts, 

Edson W. Strong, labor stand pipe, 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 

City of Northampton, stone, 

John S. Lane & Sons, stone, 

E. E. Davis, surveying, 

A. L. Smith, brick, 

Foster Bros., waste, 

Lane Construction Co., stone, 



$ 16 00 
46 00 
74 00 
144 00 
66 00 
54 00 

18 00 
20 00 
25 00 
61 00 
54 00 

294 00 

95 00 

139 00 

210 00 

104 13 

49 88 

93 62 

30 63 

31 49 

32 38 

3 50 

4 38 

5 25 
7 88 

16 62 
11 90 

19 GO 
1 80 

24 06 
1,917 65 
1,108 04 

54 84 

6 80 
1 52 

15 40 



20 



N. Y. & N. H. Rd., demurrage, 
Henry R. Holden, wood, 



$ 18 00 
2 50 

$6,593 98 



TREE WARDEN 



Montgomery & Wilson, saws, 
John F. Batzold, labor, 



$8 00 
8 00 

$16 00 



STATE ROAD AND REPAIRS 



James L. Day, team and labor, 


$ 12 00 


James Mullins, 




8 00 


Joseph S. Newman, " 




123 50 


John M. Strong, 




15 00 


John C. Ryan, 




50 00 


Wm. E. Boyle, " 




8 00 


H. Shumway, 




133 00 


Daniel P. Sheehan, " 




26 55 


Geo. M. Donelson, 


and sand, 


97 60 


H. R. Holden, 


and wood, 


23 25 


John J. Betsold, 




32 88 


Wm. R. Cutter, 




12 00 


A. W. Houghton, " 




8 00 


H. D. Smith, 


1 and coal, 


63 11 


Thos. J. Ryan, 


supt., 


160 00 


John L. Sheehan, 




89 00 


L. B. Waltz, 




57 00 


Anton Novack, 




3 50 


M. Pashek, 




3 50 


Frank J. Casten, 




118 50 


Geo. M. Franklin, 




27 13 


Jacob Geies, 




49 88 


John Fusek, 




45 50 



21 



Stefan Skibicki, 

Paul Michalicki, 

John Dembroski, 

Stefan Omasta, 

Frank L Betsold, 

Lawrence Shoenisky, 

Wm. S. Murphy, 

Benj. P. Dwight, sand, 

B. & M. R., freight on stone, 

Mass., Broken Stone Co., stone, 

John S. Lane & Sons, stone, 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 

A. L. Strong, sand and lumber, 

Wm. P. Boyle, painting fence, 

Kate Flynn, lighting lantern, 

Kate Donovan, 

Foster Bros, oil, 

N. Y. N. H. R., demurrage, 



Received from State, 



labor, 



$ 3 50 


21 88 


20 12 


8 75 


91 69 


3 50 


3 50 


4 20 


172 94 


237 37 


339 81 


119 20 


53 45 


63 75 


4 00 


4 00 


1 95 


1 00 


$2,322 51 


$3,190 35 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Fred Winzel, 


storing hose 


wagon, 


$ 5 00 


Thos. M. Day, 


(C 


<t 


5 00 


H. W. Marsh, 


It 


< < 


5 00 


C. H. Crafts, 


tt 


< < 


5 00 


James Mullins, 


(« 


(< 


5 00 


Edw. J. Day, drying hose, use 


s of horse, 


12 00 


J.J. Betsold, storing wagon, men at fires, 


18 50 



$55 50 



22 

CONTINGENCIES 

E. L. Graves, postage town reports, 

Herald Job Print, printing town reports, 

W. H. Riley & Co., repairs town hall, 

E. S. Warner, inspection barns and stock, 

S. W. Kingsley, old bill, 

S. A. French, handcuffs and shield, 

E. L. Graves, return envelopes and stamps, 

R. W. Lyman, copy of real estate titles, 

Metcalf & Co., printing election ballots, 

Wm. P. Boyle, labor town hall, 

Scott Harris, janitor town hall, 

Hatfield Gas Co., gas public buildings, 

John M. Strong, forest fires, 

J. W. Heffernan, stationery and law book, 

O'Donnell & O'Donnell, law, 

J. E. Porter, ex. Insurance Committee, 

Johnson's Bookstore, coll. book, 

E. S. Warner, inspection beeves and pork, 

H. A. Suitor, fumigating, 

P. H. Chew, check lists, 

E. L. Graves, postage as coll., 
C. T. Bagnall, tax bills, 

C. I. Stowell, care Wilkie plot, 

F. W. Shepp, slating town hall, 
W. H. Riley & Co., plumbing, 

E. E. Davis, surveying line South St., 

E. E. Davis, map of water mains, 

C. A. Byrne, returning births, 

A. J. Bonneville, 

S. W. Kingsley, police duty, 

A. R. Breor, 

L. H. Kingsley, recording and indexing, births, 

marriages, deaths, 
L. H. Kingsley, serving Warrants, notifying T. 

officers, 



; 7 


28 


103 


30 


3 


82 


61 00 


60 84 


5 00 


14 


63 


12 00 


11 


50 


16 


75 


31 


00 


35 


89 


15 


75 


6 


25 


7 


00 


7 


33 


2 


10 


101 


25 


2 


00 


3 


60 


6 


30 


2 


25 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


37 


8 


48 


13 00 


10 


75 


2 


25 


11 00 


6 


00 


47 


00 


13 50 



23 



L. H. Kingsley, supplies, 

Selectmen, expenses to Boston, telephone, etc, 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Bridgman & Lyman, books, 

Louise Shea, cleaning, 

Underwood & Underwood, supplies, 

Chas. A. Wight, book, 

H. S. Waters, book, 

P. H. Chew, supplies, 

M. A. B. Dickinson, book, 

Mrs. Buschak, cleaning, 

I. A. Flint, book, 

C. M. Barton, services as librarian, 

J. H. Howard, use of team, 



$ 6 56 
19 60 

$668 35 



$128 26 



3 


00 


11 


50 


2 


00 


3 


15 


9 


85 


5 


00 




75 


1 50 


179 


49 


5 


50 



$350 00 



CEMENT WALK, SIDEWALK REPAIRS AND 
FOOT BRIDGE 



H. Shumway, 
D. P. Sheehan, 
John C. Ryan, 
John J. Betsold, 
Jos. S. Newman, 
John F. Day, 
Thos. J. Ryan, 
F. J. Casten, 
L. B. Waltz, 
J. L. Sheehan, 
Jacob Geies, 
John Fusek, 
Mike Pauschek, 



team and labor, 



$29 63 
24 00 
24 00 
10 00 

4 00 
8 00 

38 00 

5 25 
19 00 
24 00 

7 00 
14 00 

8 75 



24 



Lawrence Shoenisky, labor, 


$ 7 00 


Peter Sabisky, 


3 50 


Stefan Stickibci, 


3 50 


Mike Duletsky, 


18 00 


R. W. Gore, 


5 25 


John Stoddard, 


2 00 


Alex Donis, sand, 


1 50 


H. D. Smith, cement, 


93 00 


E. J. McCarthy, stock and labor, 


23 52 


United Construction Co., iron foot bridge, 


463 87 


Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 


66 86 


J. A. Sullivan; supplies, 


1 14 


Foster Bros., supplies, 


10 21 



$914 98 



BRADSTREET FILL 



H. Shumway, 
John C. Ryan, 
Daniel P. Sheehan 
Belden Bros., 
F. P. Jones, 
H. W. Marsh, 
Geo. M. Donelson, 
Estelle Harris, 
Mrs. Vochula, 
Archie P. Graves, 
John F. Day, 
Thos. J. Ryan, 
L. B. Waltz, 
John L. Sheehan, 
Jacob Geies, 
John Fusek, 
Peter Zablon s ki, 
John Dembroski. 
Cash — Polish laborers, 



team and labor, 



$ 8 00 

56 00 

10 00 

30 00 

169 00 

122 37 

28 00 

38 00 

32 00 

86 00 

4 00 

52 00 

26 00 

2 00 

9 62 

4 38 

13 12 

2 62 

109 37 



Merrick Lumber Co., 

E. E. Davis, surveying, 
Ewd. A. Ryan, sand, 
M. J. Ryan, 

F. P. Jones, 



25 

labor, 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 



$ 25 92 


36 


48 


51 


15 


30 40 


67 


70 



$1014 13 



Miss Elizabeth Coffin, teaching, 


$140 00 


Hazel C. Owen, 




140 00 


Katherine W. Day, 




355 20 


Mary Decker, 




444 00 


Mary J. Mulcahy, 




491 96 


Sarah V. Kiley, ' 




463 20 


Constance C. Breor, 




380 00 


Christine Hibbard, 




393 00 


Nellie T. O'Brien, 




393 00 


Margaret A. Ryan, 




427 85 


Veronica R. Driscoll, ' 




245 00 


Mary F. Keating, 




245 00 


Alice R. Sweeney, 




230 00 


Nellie G. Smith, 




67 20 


Beatrice J. Hibbard, 


drawing, 


153 25 


Ethel Chilson, 


' music, 


36 00 


Charlotte Woods, 


( ( t 


96 00 


M. H. Bowman, services as 


Supt., 


209 14 


M. H. Bowman, tickets, 




28 80 


M. H. Bowman, supplies an 


d expenses, 


4 06 


Clinton J. Richards, services 


as Supt., 


343 77 


Clinton J. Richards, printing 


1 and supplies, 


17 92 


Houghton, Mifflin & Co., , 


supplies, 


12 01 


Silver, Burdett & Co., 


C ( 


41 95 


American Book Co., 


( ( 


11 52 


Edward Babb Co., 


( ( 


48 12 


Ginn & Co., 


(< 


25 20 



26 



J. L. Hammett Co., supplies, 


$ 114 86 


Milton Bradley Co., 


14 85 


Funk & Wagnalls Co., 


1 80 


Lafleur Bros., 


14 70 


A. N. Palmer Co., 


36 35 


G. F. Harlow Co., 


1 35 


Wright & Potter, 


2 50 


Milwaukee Brush Co., 


15 00 


J. A. Sullivan, 


38 


Quinn & Mansfield, furniture, 


22 00 


G. M. Bradford, wood, 


12 00 


F. W. Schepp, 


3 00 


F. T. Bardwell, 


4 50 


A. L. Strong, 


4 00 


H. D. Smith, labor and coal, 


499 48 


Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 


54 41 


Frank L. Betsold, lumber and labor, 


127 97 


Wm. P. Boyle, painting and labor, 


184 71 


John J. Betsold, supplies and labor, 


7 85 


T. Graves, Jr., supplies and cleaning, 


7 40 


Highway Dept., cementing cellar, 


102 58 


Phelps & Gare, clock, 


4 00 


O'Connor & Davies, plumbing, 


293 28 


Shumway & Riley, 


4 41 


W. H. Riley & Co., 


3 50 


Conn. Valley St. Ry., tickets, 


36 00 


Merrill C. Strong, transportation, 


4 00 


Mrs. S. Vachula, 


6 00 


Constance C. Breor, 


1 92 


Alice R. Sweeney, 


11 75 


Katherine W. Day, sweeping, 


3 50 


Hazel Merrick, 


2 00 


Margaret Wickles, 


2 00 


Kate Wickles, 


5 50 


Kate Flynn, cleaning, 


9 00 


Kate Knasnek, 


3 00 



A. LaMountain, taking census, 



18 00 



27 



Alfred E. Breor, labor, 


$ 17 00 


O. Belden & Sons, and wood, 


24 00 


Frank J . Saffer, 


4 50 


Earle McGrath, 


1 50 


A. R. Breor, and express, 


5 10 


Cornelia M. Wickles, janitor, 


64 50 


A. L. Carl, 


24 50 


Scott Harris, 


96 00 


John Salvas, 


48 80 


James P. Kelly, 


96 00 


Mrs. A. Hilbert, 


72 50 


Charles D. Flynn, " 


123 15 


M.J. Ryan, supplies, 


10 80 


Newson & Co., 


50 00 


E. J. McCarthy, plumbing, 


1 75 


Chas. Scribner's Sons, books, 


3 25 


D. C. Heath & Co., 


13 34 


S. W. Kingsley, labor, 


10 75 


J.J. Betsold, 


5 50 




$7,686 53 



RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN. 



State Aid, 

Poor Expenditures, 

Town Officers, 

School Physicians, 

Schools, 

Insurance, 

Bonds Town Officers, 

Street Lighting, 

Memorial Hall, 

Water Rates, 

Contingencies, 

Highways and Bridges, 

State Road and Repairs, 



120 00 
536 36 

1,482 50 
100 00 

7,735 64 

156 75 

57 00 

2,520 32 
159 13 
500 00 
668 35 

2,556 46 

2,322 51 



28 



Special Repairs, 


$ 613 92 


Public Library, 


350 00 


Sewers, 


1,253 72 


Fire Department, 


55 50 


Cemeteries, 


100 00 


Smith Academy, 


1,000 00 


Chestnut Street Sidewalk, 


214 60 


Care of Commons, 


48 50 


Memorial Day, 


75 00 


Smith Industrial School, 


200 00 


Tree Warden, 


16 00 


Firemen's Muster, 


75 00 


Permanent Roads, 


6,593 98 


Cement Walk, Repairs and Foot Bridge, 


914 98 


Bradstreet Fill, 


1,014 13 




$31,440 35 



LIST OF APPRORIATIONS VOTED TO BE RAISED 

AT THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Hju,d March 20th, 1911 

For Memorial Day, $ 75 00 

Care of Cemeteries, 100 00 

Teacher of Music, 150 00 

Teacher of Drawing, 150 00 

School Physicians, l00 00 

Firemen's Muster, 75 00 

Prospect Street Sewer, 212 00 

North Main Street Sewer, 250 00 

Chestnut Street Sidewalk, 200 00 

8 Electric Lights on North Street, 140 00 

3 Electric Lights on Valley Street, 50 00 

Tuition— Smith Industrial School, 200 00 

Tuition— Smith Academy, 1,000 00 

50 Electric Lights— No. Hatfield & West, 900 00 



29 



For Ordinary Repairs — Highways and Bridges, 
Hardening Road at Wm. E. Boyle's, 
Care of Commons, 
Public Library, 
Permanent Road on Prospect Street— $1000. 00 

from Treas., 
Support of Poor, 
Permanent Road on Main Street— $2000.00 

from Treas., 
Draining North Street, 
Electric Lights already installed, 

2 Electric Lights on No. Prospect Street, 
Water Rates, 
Contingencies, 
Interest, 

Schools, (and Dog Fund) 
Fire Department, 
Salaries Town Officials, 
Bonds — Town Officials, 
Insurance, 
Care Memorial Hall, 
Repairs on Concrete Sidewalk, 
Repairs on Gravel Sidewalk, 
Elm Street Sewer, 
Permanent Road on Elm Street, 
Water Extension at No. Hatfield, 

3 Electric Lights from Crafts' cor. north, 



$ 2,500 00 


75 00 


50 00 


350 00 


i 

1,000 00 


1,000 00 

1 


1,000 00 


100 00 


2,066 00 


36 00 


500 00 


800 00 


400 00 


6,100 00 


150 00 


1,400 00 


50 00 


115 00 


150 00 


400 00 


400 00 


700 00 


1,000 oo 


1,650 00 


54 00 


$25,648 00 



JOHN C. RYAN, 
THOMAS J. RYAN, 
JOHN J. BETSOLD, 

Selectmen of Hatfield. 



I have this day examined the books of the Selectmen and 
find them correct. 



Hatfield, March 5, 1912 



V. H. KELLER, Auditor. 



30 

LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECTMEN 
OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD, 1912. 



Name 

Boyle, William E- 
Boyle, James L. 
Boyle, Patrick J. 
Boyle, William P. 
Belden, Oscar E. 
Billiugs, Louis A. 
Crafts, Edson S. 
Dickinson, Edward N. 
Doppman, Adam F. 
Graves, Thaddeus, Jr, 
Jubenville, Eugene 
Kiley, Michael P. 
Kiley, John W. 
Morton, Albert W. 
Newman, Joseph S. 
O'Dea, Thomas M. 
Proulx, Larkin M. 
Proulx, Alfred B. 
Ryan, Matthew J. 
Vollinger, Frank G. 
Wade Charles W. 
Warner, C. Edward 
Whalen, Richard J. 
Wight, Leland H. 
Waite, Charles H. 



Occupation 
Farmer 



Painter 
Farmer 

a 

Carpenter 
Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer, in account with the 
TOWN OF HATFIELD. 

Dr. 

To balance in Treasury, $1602 32 

To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, Coll., (1910), 3143 32 

" (1911), 26,235 62 

To cash rec'd from Treas. Water Commissioners, 3200 00 

District Court fines, 133 00 

Auctioneer's License, 1 00 

Slaughter Licenses, 4 00 

Pool License, 2 00 

Refunding of Dog Fund, 122 30 

Rent of Town Hall, 40 50 

Rent of Silas Porter House, 15 00 

City of Boston, school supplies, 62 00 

State, Corporation Tax, 261 49 

National Bank Tax, 874 62 

Street Ry. Tax, 220 24 

State Aid, 72 00 

Mass. Highway Commission, 3190 35 

Tuition Industrial School, 167 50 

Supt. of Schools, 462 97 

Inspection of Animals, 63 00 

Income Mass. School Fund, 755 68 

T. Graves, Jr., school supplies sold, 9 07 

John Vochula, cemetery plot, 50 

David Mullany, load stone, 3 00 

3i 



32 



Received from B. & M. Rd., rebate on freight, 
H. D. Smith, lumber sold, 
N. Y., N. H. Rd., fighting fires, 
W. H. Dickinson Est., laying pipe, 
A. W. Morton, sewer entrance, 
H. E. Bardwell, " and 

First Parish, 
Smith Academy, 
Joseph Douyard, 
Alex Czelotka, 
D. P. McGrath, 
John Gendron, 
R. F. Fitzgerald, 
Val. Parada, 
Charles Winter, 
FredWinzel, 
M.J.Ryan, 
E.A.Ryan, 

F. H. Bardwell, sale of tile, 
H. Shumway, sidewalk, 
Mary J. Prince, 
J. L. Proulx, 



$41,378 06 
To Cash received from Temporary Loans. 
Northampton Inst, for Savings, eight mos. Note, $8000 00 



$ 1 


47 


8 90 


5 


75 


6 60 


66 


00 


tile, 39 


00 


49 


18 


41 


72 


46 06 


38 


80 


39 


64 


41 


38 


35 


88 


26 


54 


20 00 


38 


76 


33 00 


33 


00 


1 


20 


44 


20 


34 


30 


85 


20 



$49,378 06 



Cr. 



By cash paid Selectmen's orders, $31,440 35 

Interest on Water Bonds, 2000 00 

District Court Fees, 210 91 

Bureau of Statistics, 3 00 



33 



By cash paid Interest on temporary loans, $230 98 
Water Com. advance con'stn 1300 00 
County Tax, 1994 65 

State Tax, 2135 50 

Treas. Sinking Fund, 861 67 

Balance in Treasury, 1201 00 



$41,378 06 

By cash paid Northampton Inst, for Savings, note, $8000 00 



$49,378 06 



IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 
(1910 TAXES) 



Dr. 



To cash received, $3143 32 

To Assessor's orders of Abatement, 316 22 

~ $3459 54 



Cr. 



By uncollected taxes, 


$3349 88 


Interest on taxes, 


81 66 


Addition to Warrant, 


28 00 




5po4oy o4 


(1911 TAXES) 




Dr. 




To cash received. 


$26,235 62 


uncollected taxes, 


3448 63 


discount on taxes. 


508 89 




$30,193 14 



34 




Cr. 






$29,350 34 




809 40 




33 40 




$30,193 14 



By Assessor's Warrant, 
Addition to Warrant, 
Interest collected, 



I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collector, and 
find that he has been credited by the Treasurer, with the 
amount of $3143.32, of the taxes of 1910; and $26,235.62 of 
the taxes of 1911. 

VERNET H. KELLER, Auditor. 

Hatfield. March 5th, 1912. 

WATER SINKING FUND 

Dr. 

To thirty years four per cent. Water Bonds, $50,000 00 

Cr. 
By Sinking Fund, $17,494 24 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

Dr. 

To Notes outstanding, 

Bills due March 1st, not in, 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, 1911, 
Due from State Aid, 

Inspection of Animals, 
. State, Smith School, 
Sewer Assessments, 
Balance in Treasury, 

Balance !n favor of town, 





$ 000 00 




730 00 


$3,448 63 




120 00 




30 00 




100 00 




207 00 




1201 00 






$5106 63 






$4376 63 



35 

I have examined the books and accounts of the Treasurer 
of the Town of Hatfield for the year ending March 1st. 1912. 
I find Selectmen's orders on file to the amount of Thirty-one 
thousand four hundred forty and thirty-five one hundredths 
($31,440.35) dollars, with evidence of their payment by him. 

Also, cancelled notes and receipts for State and County 
taxes and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the Treasury of One thousand two 
hundred one and no-hundredths ($1201.00) dollars. 

VERNET H. KELLER, Auditor. 

Hatfield, Mareh 5th, 1912. 



Report of the Sinking Fund 
Commissioners 



$ 1101 23 


1419 95 


1104 16 


872 99 


958 98 


1019 05 


937 78 


2080 10 


3000 00 


2000 00 


1000 00 


2000 00 



We have the following amounts placed to the credit of 
the Sinking- Funds: 

Nonotuck Saving Bank, 
Haydenville Savings Bank, 
Florence Savings Bank, 
Easthampton Savings Bank, 
Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, 
Northampton Institution for Savings, 
Springfield Institution for Savings, 
Union Trust Co., Springfield, 
Boston & Maine R. R., bonds, 
N. Y., N. H. & H., bonds, 
Springfield Street Railway, bonds, 
Hatfield Water Bonds, 

$17,494 24 
M. J. RYAN, 
E. S. WARNER, 
L. J. PELISSIER, 
Sinking Fund Commissioners. 

I have this day examined accounts of Sinking Fund 
Commissioners of Town of Hatfield and find all securittes on 
hand as per list above. 

VERNET H. KELLER, Auditor. 

Hatfield, Mass., March 2, 1912. 

36 



Water Commissioners' Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the sixteenth 
annual report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows: — 

Balance of cash from last years account, $ 557 15 
Cash from collection of water rates, 4,303 29 

Connection and supplies furnished, 92 56 

Advance from the town on new construction, 1,300 00 



$6,253 00 



We have paid the past year as follows: — 



Town of Hatfield, from water rates, $2,900 00 

Town of Hatfield, advance for construction, 300 00 

Charles Millar & Son Co., iron pipe and lead, 1,314 71 

Norwood Engineering Co., hydrants and supplies, 188 90 

W. H. Riley & Co., lead and supplies, 142 05 

B. & M. R. R., freight and car service, 4 53 

N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., expense crossing track, 10 61 

M. D. Patterson, as engineer, 47 39 

M.J. Ryan, contract laying pipe, 716 95 

M. J. Ryan, cash paid for 2 in. pipe and supplies, 108 95 

Northampton Water Works, supplies, 41 97 

O'Connor & Davies, jute packing, 4 13 

O, Connor & McGrath, lead, 9 60 

M.J. Proulx, labor and expense, 70 50 

Fred T. Bardwell, carting and laying stone, 9 75 

37 



$ 4 25 


63 07 


66 03 


112 45 


137 16 



38 

A. L. Strong, labor and team, 

Charles W. Wade, collection of water rates, 

Edson W. Strong, 

Edson W. Strong, labor and cash paid, 

Balance cash on hand, 

$6,253 00 
The total cost of the water works to March 1, 1912, is 
$61,084.43. 

There are now 341 connections with private property, 96 
hydrants for fire protection, 5 water tanks and water in 5 
school houses and in Memorial Hall. 

The extension of the water main the past year has been 
1894 feet of 6 in. cast iron pipe, 2202 feet of 4 in. pipe and 
437 feet of 2 in. wrought iron pipe, at a cost of $2,040.89 at 
West Brook and $417.00 at East Division, total $2,457.89. 



There are now 18,781 feet of 8 in. pipe 


49,680 


< < 


6 in. 


34,798 


< ( 


4 in. 


1,757 


< i 


2 in. " 


10,658 


i < 


lin. " 


1,070 


< < 


Hm. " 



Total 116,744 feet or over 22 miles. 
MICHAEL J. PROULX, 
DANIEL W. WELLS, 
ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Hatfield Water Commissioners. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 1, 1912. 

I have this day examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the town of Hatfield 
and find them correct with vouchers on file for all payments 
made. 

VERNET H. KELLER, Auditor. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 1st, 1912. 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics for the Town of Hatfield for the year 
1911, are as follows: 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS 





No. 


Males 


Femal 


January, 


8 


2 


6 


February, 


7 


4 


3 


March, 


7 


4 


3 


April, 


4 


2 


2 


May, 


6 


5 


1 


June, 


4 


1 


3 


July, 


2 





2 


August, 


7 


5 


2 


September, 


7 


5 


2 


October, 


4 


3 


1 


November, 


3 





3 


December, 


10 


4 


6 



Total, 



69 



35 



34 



BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 





Father 


Mother 


in Canada, 





3 


United States, 


17 


15 


Poland, 


46 


45 


Germany, 


1 


1 


Hungary, 


5 


5 



69 



69 



40 

BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


68 


67 


92 


64 


79 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

No. 

January, 4 

March, 1 

April, 1 

May, 3 

July, 1 

August, 1 

September, 6 

October, 2 

November, 2 

22 

First marriage of both parties, 19 

Second marriage of groom, first of bride, 2 

Second marriage of bride, first of groom, 1 

The oldest and youngest grooms were fifty-two and twenty 
years of age respectively. 

The oldest and youugest brides were thirty-nine and eighteen 
years of age respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED 



Born in United States, 
Poland, 
Hungary, 
Canada, 
Ireland, 



Groom 


Bride 


4 


4 


16 


16 


1 


1 


1 








1 



22 22 



41 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


22 


33 


21 


33 


26 



DEATHS BY MONTHS 





No. 


Males 


Femal 


January, 


4 


4 





February, 


3 


3 





March, 


6 


2 


4 


April, 


2 





2 


May, 


2 


1 


1 


June, 


2 


1 


1 


July, 


1 


1 





August, 


1 





1 


September, 


1 





1 


October, 


1 


1 





November, 


3 





3 


December, 


2 





2 



28 



12 



15 



No. 

Under 1 year of age, 7 
Between 1 and 5 yrs., 1 



5 


10 


1 


10 


20 


1 


20 


30 


2 


30 


40 


2 


40 


50 





50 


60 


1 


60 


70 


4 


2,0 


80 


3 


80 


90 


,6 



Males 
4 


1 
2 


1 

1 
4 



Females 
3 
1 
1 


2 


4 
2 
2 



28 



13 



15 



42 

Age of oldest person deceased (female) 88 years, 11 months 
and 10 days. 

CAUSES OF DEATH 

Classified according ta the nomenclature adopted by the 
State board of Registration. 

ZYMOTIC DISEASES 

Malarial Fever, 1 

Cholera Infantum, 1 

CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES 

Hydrocephalus, 1 

Infantile Debility, 1 

Premature Birth, 1 

Still Born, 4 

Senility, 1 

Brain Disease, 1 

LOCAL DISEASES 

Hernia, 1 

Apoplexy, 2 

Pneumonia, 6 

Heart Disease, 2 

Bronchitis, Acute, 1 

Nephritis, Chronic, 2 

VIOLENT DEATHS 

Burns — accidental, 1 

Struck by train — accidental, 1 

Killed by live wire — accidental, 1 



43 
NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 

Henry Albert Wade Lawrence Vollinger 

Ralph Hervey Howard Roswell Billings 

Robert E. Fitzgerald Armena Rodier Kiley 

Edward Proulx Elizabeth Pec ten 

Emma Cooper Shank Annie M. Kleasner 

Sarah Jane Porter Bridget F. McGrath 

Peter Saffer Hannah S. Wells 

Paul Vachula Agnes Czelotka 

Henry Radziwon Nellie Maria Belden 

Angeline W. Dickinson Silas Porter 

Bridget Fitzgerald Anna Vachula 

Augusta A. Porter Graves Stella Czelotka 

DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending 
November 30, 1912, with the receipts and settlements of the 
account with the County Treasurer, is as follows: — 

76 male dogs at $2.00 each, 
5 female dogs at $5.00 each, 



$152 00 
25 00 






$177 00 
16 20 



Less fees, 81 dogs at 20 cents each, 
Paid to County Treasurer, $160 80 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Town Clerk. 



Assessors' Report 



Value of assessed personal estate, $ 401,958 00 
Value of assessed real estate, 1,212,805 00 



Total value of assessed estate, 


$1,614,763 00 


Value of assessed buildings, 


$664,140 00 


Val 


ue of assessed land, 


548,665 00 




$1,212,805 00 


No. 


polls assessed, 


546 


No. 


residents assessed, 


327 


All others, 


54 






381 


No. 


non residents assessed on 


property, 465 


For poll tax only, 


296 






761 


Rate of tax per $1000, 


$17.50 


No. 


of horses assessed, 


451 


No. 


of cows, 


325 


No. 


of neat cattle, 


25 


No. 


of swine, 


29 


No. 


of fowls, 


176 


No. 


of dwelling houses, 


344 


No. 


of acres of land, 


9,258 



45 



State Tax, 
County Tax, 
Town Tax, 
Overlaying^, 




$ 2,135 50 

1,994 65 

24,798 00 

422 19 








$29,350 34 


Estimated Bank and Corporation Tax, 
Excise Tax, 


850 00 
671 84 


Value of property 
Acts of 1909. 


exempt 


from taxation, < 


Chapter 490, 


Literary Institutions, 
Church property, 




$73,626. 00 

27,000 00 





$100,626 00 
Respectfully submitted, 

EDSON W. STRONG, 
WM. H. BELDEN, 
L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



AND 



Superintendent of Schools 



OF THE 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending March 1, 1912 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Thaddeus Graves, Jr., Chairman, Term expires 1912 

A. R. Breor, Secretary, " " 1913 

Rev. W. E. Foley, " " 1914 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Clinton J . Richards, 

22 Prospect Avenue, Northampton 

Telephone 858-W 



TRUANT OFFICERS 

S. W. Kingsley 
A. L. Strong 



SCHOOL CENSUS, SEPT., 1911 

Boys between the ages of 5 and 15, 175 

Girls between the ages of 5 and 15, 172 



Total, 347 

Total for September, 1910, 282 

Increase, 65 



49 



Report of School Committee 



At the beginning of the year the Academy trustees 
granted to the School Committee the privilege of using a 
room in the Academy. The eighth and ninth grades were 
put into this room, and the room vacated was used for a new 
first grade. Even this additional room was not enough and 
some of the first grade pupils had to be returned to the Hill 
School. This is not satisfactory as it hampers the work of 
the second and third grades in that school. 

As the birth-rate has been increasing for the past six 
years this over-crowding will continue and increase until 
some further provision for relief is made — either a new room 
added or a new building put up. 

Toilet rooms for the girls and for the boys have been 
put in the Hill School. New windows were put in the Brad- 
street School, and the cellar of the Center School has been 
cemented. In the North Hatfield School needed repairs were 
made in the hall. 

The severity of the winter has fully shown up the weak 
points in the heating system of the West Hatfield School, and 
some more serviceable system ought to be put in. Also the 
ventilating system in the schools at North Hatfield and 
Bradstreet should be changed. 

The school work has been interrupted by the usual winter 
epidemic — this year it was measles, whooping-cough, and 
chicken-pox. 

The committee has approved a set of rules and regula- 
tions which will be found on another page. 

THADDEUS GRAVES, JR., Chairman. 
50 



51 



FINANCIAL SUMMARY 



RESOURCES 



Town appropriation, 

Music and Drawing, 

Supplies sold, 

From City of Boston, 

State, Supt. of Schools, 
Mass. School Fund, 
Dog Fund, 



Orders drawn on Treasury, 
Balnce unexpended, 



$6100 00 


300 00 


9 07 


62 00 


462 97 


755 68 


122 30 


$7812 02 


$7735 64 



$76 38 



Report of Superintendent of 
Schools 



I hereby submit my annual report. As my connection 
with the schools covers a period of but one-half of the school 
year. I shall only attempt to give briefly some of my impres- 
sions of present conditions and to suggest certain lines along 
which improvement might be made. 

Nothing revolutionary or spectacular has been or will be 
attempted during the present management. We are trying to 
place emphasis on what are generally recognized as the essen- 
tials of education — comprising the subjects of morals, hygiene, 
reading, writing, arithmetic, spelling, and language. These 
essentials should be our first concern, but there must be built 
upon and added to them various other subjects, if we are to 
more completely equip our boys and girls for happy and useful 
living. 

TEACHERS 

As may be seen by referring to the statistical tables, there 
have been several changes in teachers since the last report was 
made. The resignations at West Hatfield made it necessary 
to secure two new teachers for those schools, and the transfer 
of Miss Breor to the Center Primary created another vacancy 
at Bradstreet. All of the present force appear to be working 
faithfully and for the most part with commendable results. 

The importance of the service rendered by a truly efficient 
teacher can hardly be over-estimated. Such a teacher de- 
serves the hearty support of every citizen. She should receive 
not only an adequate salary, but also such a degree of personal 

52 



53 

sympathy and encouragement that she may feel that her efforts 
in behalf of our children are being appreciated. 

The most satisfactory school systems are usually found 
in those places where the conditions of service are made so 
attractive that efficient teachers can be retained for a series 
of years. 

COURSK OF STUDY 

At the beginning of the present school year each teacher 
was provided with a copy of a course of study prepared for 
another district where the school conditions are much the same 
as here. This has been found helpful and suggestive, but a 
considerable revision would make it more valuable. 

The work of our schools too largely tends to develop the 
ideals that find their expression in city rather than in country 
life. Not every country-bred boy or girl should be a farmer, 
but the large majority of them would be vastly better off to 
remain on the farm than to go to the city. By all available 
means, our children should be led to develop an appreciation 
of rural life and a capacity to enjoy its comforts and advant- 
ages. The public schools should lead in the movement to 
enrich and enlarge the life of the country and the country 
child. 

It has been intimated officially that the State Department 
of Education is to prepare a course of study for the schools of 
the state. Unless such a course — adapted for use in the rural 
as well as the city schools — is furnished, it will be necessary 
to prepare independent outlines for the town or district. 

Any comprehensive plan of work for our public schools 
should include at least these three aims: 

1. To provide for a complete general education. 

2. To prepare for a more extended education in college, 

technical, or industrial school. 

3. To provide those who leave school at any time with 

the best possible education up to that time. 



54 

TEXT-BOOKS 

The only changes of any importance have been the intro- 
duction of the Aldine Readers to replace the Ward System of 
reading, and of the Palmer System of Penmanship in place of 
the old Vertical System which has everywhere proved inade- 
quate for school or business purposes. 

The results of the change in writing differ according to 
the skill and interest shown by teachers, but the improvement 
will become more apparent in the higher grades. In the ver- 
tical writing the attention was given chiefly to correct forms. 
The Palmer System places the emphasis at first on position 
and movement. It has been widely adopted, including the 
cities of New York and Boston. Its principles are the same 
as those taught in our leading Normal Schools and Business 
Colleges, and wherever it has been intelligently continued for 
a series of years, the pupils have acquired a style of penman- 
ship that combines legibility, rapidity, and ease in execution. 

The improvement in reading has been very marked in 
the primary grades since they began using the Aldine books. 
Children learn to read by reading, and they need an abundance 
of easy and interesting material involving much repetition and 
review if they are to develop facility and expression. To 
secure the best results several more supplementary primary 
readers are needed. 

To make anything like a complete course in history 
several elementary texts should be added. We have an 
abundance of myths and fairy stories. A limited number of 
such books are desirable, but they should not be allowed to 
take the place of those dealing with the real persons and in- 
cidents of our own and other countries. 

We could reasonably expect much more satisfactory re- 
sults in arithmetic if a modern three-book series could take 
the place of the books now in use, and the introduction of an 
up-to-date spelling book would also strengthen the work in 
that subject. 



55 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

In addition to the changes and repairs which are obvious- 
ly necessary in the present buildings, it is evident that some 
provision must be made before very long for the accommoda- 
tion of the increasing number of children in our schools. 
The present first grade contains 85 pupils. This number is 
unusual and the entering class for 1912 is not expected to be 
as large. But the birth-rate in town for seven years beginning 
with 1905 has averaged 72, as shown by the Town Clerk's 
records. This means that the first grade for several years to 
come is likely to average at least 65 without allowing for any 
increase on account of persons moving into town. If these 
pupils enter at six years of age and remain only eight years — 
the legal requirement — this will mean a school population of 
about 500 in from five to eight years as compared with our 
present enrollment of 315. 

In providing accommodations for the increasing number 
of children the citizens of the town will have to decide be- 
tween the policy of erecting several small scattered buildings 
or one or two larger central buildings. Immediate action is 
not suggested, but if present conditions continue it would 
seem that the town would have to face the question next year. 

In this connection it may be appropriate to consider some 
of the advantages of consolidation. The centralizing of 
schools as far as possible in one building brings many advan- 
tages. Among them are the following: — more regular and 
longer attendance, better classification and grading, better 
teaching and supervision, more complete care and control of 
pupils at school with healthful surroundings, a broader com- 
panionship and better community feeling, equalization of ad- 
vantages, larger opportunity for instruction in special 
branches, — all these leading to greater interest, progress, and 
a more complete preparation for citizenship, the fundamental 
purpose of our schools. 

To make consolidation completely successful the follow- 
ing conditions must he fulfilled: (l) Comfortable and safe 



56 

conveyance should be furnished for those pupils living at too 
great a distance to travel on foot; (2) There should be suit- 
able care and control of pupils — especially the younger ones 
— not only when school is in session, but during the recesses 
and noon intermission; (3) Modern school buildings and 
ample grounds should be provided making adequate pro- 
vision for heat, light, ventilation, seating, and sanitary 
arrangements, and cared for by a competent janitor. 

In all our plans for the futnre of our schools, we would 
do well to keep in mind the great advantages to be derived 
from consolidation when properly managed. 

ATTENDANCE 

It is a maxim of school management that regular attend- 
ance is indispensible to satisfactory school work. It was 
necessary during the fall to report to the truant officer a few 
cases of children who were being kept out to work. During 
the winter term the attendance in some schools has been very 
irregular on account of contagious diseases. This has been 
particularly true of the schools of West Hatfield where the at- 
tendance for the winter term has been less than fifty per cent. 

One of our most difficult problems is how to hold in school 
the children of fourteen and over. At this age their labor is 
worth least to the industries, and at the same time they could 
best appreciate and comprehend the instruction afforded in 
school. Many parents remove their children from school as 
soon as they can do so legally, and put them to work without 
regard to the child's need of further schooling. In the absence 
of any law requiring attendance after the age of fourteen, some 
means should be sought to impress parents with regard to 
their children's welfare. Meanwhile during the limited time 
that we can hold them, it is our special duty to give them not 
only the essentials of an education, but as rich and varied a 
program of studies as possible. 



57 
TEACHERS' MEETINGS 

Three teachers' meetings have been held this year. One 
of these relating to penmanship was held in this town with 
the teachers of both Hatfield and Hadley in attendance. 
Another will doubtless be called during the spring term. 

In these meetings not only are matters relating to organ- 
ization and management considered, but also the larger prob- 
lems of how the schools can become most servicable to their 
pupils and to the community life. 

HEALTH AND SANITATION 

The health of school children is of vital tmportance, for 
without good health no satisfactory progress can be made in 
any direction. Following are some suggestions for improve- 
ments: 

Water-closets should be provided in buildings where a 
water supply is available. 

Where water if not available, clean and decent out-build- 
ings should be furnished. 

Drinking fountains should also be installed where possi- 
ble. The only one now in use is at Smith Academy. 

Facilities for washing hands and face should be provided, 
including paper towels. 

As far as practical an abundance of light should be fur- 
nished, coming from left and rear. 

Pupils should not suffer for lack of pure air. 

The heat of the rooms should be maintained at about 
sixty-eight degrees. 

Parents should see that physical defects reported by 
teachers or school physician are treated intelligently. 

Pupils should be supplied with individual pencils, rulers, 
books, and other school supplies. 

The essentials of hygiene should be taught more symtem- 
atically in all grades. 

Suitable physical exercises should be given to all pupils. 



58 

DRAWING AND MUSIC 

Fortunately no argument is needed to convince any one 
of the value of these two subjects or of the necessity for spec- 
ial instructors. We have been able to retain the services of both 
Miss Charlotte Woods of Hatfield as Supervisor of Music, and 
of Miss Beatrice Hibbard of North Hadley as Supervisor of 
Drawing. Both are working with zeal and intelligence, and 
there seems to be a good degree of interest and progress in 
their classes. Their reports annexed will give some idea of 
their methods and aims. 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

The calendar printed in the report of last year will be 
followed for the school year ending June, 1912. All Hatfield 
schools will open Tuesday, Sept. 3, 1912. A calendar for the 
school year 1912-1913, will be announced during the month 
of September, 1912. 

In conclusion I wish to express my appreciation of the 
interest and co-operation of school officials, teachers and 
citizens in the efforts being made to improve school conditions 
in town. 

CLINTON T. RICHARDS. 



Report of Supervisor of Music 



In submitting a report of the work in music, we can 
fairly say that some progress has been attained. We feel that 
a large per cent of the children have a grasp of the meaning 
of musical signs and symbols and can sing independently, 
relying on self alone to tell them how it should be done cor- 
rectly. It is one thing to learn from another how a certain 
song or exercise should sound and after repeatedly hearing 
the same selection sung and resung, to be able to imitate and 
render it without mistake. It is quite another accomplishment 
to be able to sing that same song or exercise on first acquaint- 
ance and to know because of thorough knowledge of musical 
form, that it has been sung, technically speaking, without a 
flaw. 

We are endeavoring to have the children understand 
musical language as well as they do the reading of their 
"mother tongue." We would not have them in the place of 
the little boy who, although he can repeat his Mother Goose 
rhymes verbatim, insists on holding his book before him, thus 
reminding himself that he is reading what is, in reality, illeg- 
ible to him. We all have seen school children insist likewise 
in having music books in their hands when they do not need 
any, deceiving themselves that they have attained some know- 
ledge of musical notation, whereas, on the contrary, they are 
merely singing the songs as they have learned them by imita- 
tion and have no idea at all what the notes mean. 

The work is being carried on in these several lines — song 
drill, sight singing, individual work, and theory. 

Many thanks and appreciation of effort are due to the 
grade teachers for all their patience and perseverance, for 
without their hearty co-operation no results worthy of men- 
tioning could be realized. 

CHARLOTTE WOODS 
59 



Report of Supervisor of Drawing 



The work in drawing of this year has been continued 
along- the same lines as formerly. 

In the lower grades an appreciation of things surrounding 
the pupils and belonging to their environment has been de- 
veloped with the possibility of placing on paper their own 
ideas in a truly representative manner. It is necessary that 
problems be kept simple in order to have them interesting and 
successful, but at the same time a foundation is laid for the 
more advanced work of the older pupils. 

The principles of perspective and application of the same 
are brought before the pupils of the intermediate grades and 
an ability to represent in a true pictorial manner common 
objects surrounding one daily is devoloped. 

The pupils of the higher grades are drilled in this line to 
such an extent that in drawing an object or objects the idea 
of the perspective and relation of parts is almost habitual; 
hence we are able }o advance much farther in real art pictorial, 
decorative, and constructive. 

It is my endeavor to introduce more of the constructive 
phase in art than formerly, such as basketry, weaving and 
book-binding; to teach the children to appreciate good forms 
in construction, the composing and application of original 
designs, and an understanding of the making of ordinary 
objects about us. 

Much better work has been done this year and a livelier 
interest and personal application has been manifested by the 
pupils and because of which it is my pleasure to express 
gratitude for the hearty co-operation and helpful interest taken 
by both teachers and superintendent. 

BEATRICE J. HIBBARD. 

60 



Report of Medical Inspector 



Twenty-four (24) visits of inspection have been made to 
School Houses in the past year; 52 pupils inspected outside of 
school. There has been one case of Scarlet Fever in a pupil, 
without infection to others, and an epidemic of Measles, 
Chicken Pox, Whooping Cough, and few cases of the Mumps. 

The schools are much improved by hygiene of new 
plumbing. It is understood that a similar improvement is now 
permissable in Bradstreet, as the Town has accepted sewer as 
drain for sewer and fountain . The present out-buildings there, 
are very objectionable. 

CHAS. A. BYRNE. M. D. 



61 



Hatfield School 
Rules and Regulations 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

1. The Superintendent of schools shall have the care 
and supervision of schools under the direction and control of 
the School Committee, and shall be their executive officer. 

2. He shall visit the schools as often as his other duties 
will permit to obtain a personal knowlekge of their condition 
and to assist the teachers in the performance of their duties. 

3. He shall have a voice in the councils of the Com- 
mittee, nominate teachers, recommend textbooks and have 
charge of the administration of the course of study, and of 
the grading - , classification, and promotion of pupils. 

4. He shall acquaint himself with what ever concerns 
the interest and progress of popular education and may call 
meetings of the teachers for the purpose of advising in regard 
to the best methods instruction, discipline, and school man- 
agement. 

5. He shall inspect the school premises, textbooks, and 
apparatus, and report to the Committee any deficiency or 
condition unfavorable to the health or progress of pupils, with 
suggestions for correction or improvement. 

6. He shall assist the School Committee in keeping 
their records and accounts, and in making such reports as 
are required by law. 

PRINCIPALS 

1. In every school building containing two or more 
schools one teacher shall be appointed as Principal. 

62 



63 

2. Principals shall have general charge of the school- 
buildings, grounds, and appurtenances of their respective 
schools. They shall have access to all parts of the school 
premises and inspect them at regular intervals- They shall 
investigate any cases of marking, defacing, defiling, or other- 
wise injuring the school property, and take prompt measures 
to prevent their recurrence. 

3. They shall make rules, subject to the approval of the 
Committee, for the care and control of pupils in and around 
the school buildings and grounds, and may assign teachers 
and janitors to any special duties in and about the school 
premises. They shall especially provide for the control and 
supervision of pupils during the recess periods and noon in- 
termission, both within the buildings and on the school 
grounds. 

4. They shall receive all books and supplies for use in 
their buildings, distribute tnem to the different teachers, and 
cause a careful record of the same to ke kept. 

TEACHERS 

1. Teachers shall make out such records and render 
such reports as are required by the Superintendent of Schools. 

2. They shall be present at their rooms at least fifteen 
minutes before the time for opening both the fo.enoon and 
afte.noon session, or earlier when the interests of the schools 
require their presence. 

3. They shall require careful use of all books, and econ- 
omy in the use of supplies. At regular intervals, not less 
than once each term, they shall inspect all books loaned to 
pupils and shall collect moderate damages for any unwonted 
injury or loss of books and supplies. But if pupils .efuse to 
pay such damages the teacher shall refer the case to the 
Superintendent of Schools. 

4. They shall require excuses from parents or guardians 
either in person or by written note in all cases of absence or 
tardiness. All excuses should give the cause of absence. 



64 

Unexcused absences should be reported to the Truant Officer 
and Superintendent of Schools, and regarded as cases of 
truancy. Written excuses shall be preserved until the end of 
the school year subject to the call of the Superintendent or 
School Committee. 

5. Each teacher shall prepare a program of daily study 
and recitation periods, and shall send a copy of the same to 
the Superintendent of Schools to be placed on file. After his 
approval of the program, no material change shall be made 
in it without his advice and consent. There shall also be kept 
at each teacher's desk, readily accessible for the inspection of 
School Officials: the school register; program; seating plan; 
records of books and supplies received, on hand, and loaned 
to pupils; record of pupils' standing, together with some of 
their more recent written work. 

6. The Superintendent may grant to each teacher one 
day in each of the fall and winter terms to visit other public 
schools, and may designate the schools to be visited. Teachers 
who avail themselves of this permission shall make a written 
report to the Superintendent within one month of such visit, 
as to the schools visited and exercises observed with remarks 
or criticisms thereon. They are also allowed two days to at- 
tend state or county teachers' institutes or conventions. 

7. Any teacher who may find it necessary to suspend a 
pupil, must immediately notify the parents, principal, and the 
School Committee, or Superintendent, giving the offence and 
the conditions imposed. Any case of truancy shall be im- 
mediately reported to a Truant Officer and the Superintendent 
of Schools. 

8. Whenever any teacher is temporarily absent from 
school, it shall be her duty to report, at once to the Committee 
or Superintendent, but in no case shall she furnish a substitute 
without the consent of the School Officials. 

9. Teachers shall observe carefully the ventilation and 
heat of their rooms and endeavor to keep the temperature from 
68 to 70 degrees Farenheit. They may appoint pupils to keep 



65 

a record of the thermometer on blanks provided for that pur- 
pose. Except in very severe weather, the windows should be 
opened and the room flushed with pure air at each recess and 
noon intermission. 

10. Teachers shall be paid at the end of each four week 
period except at the close of a term or of a fiscal year when 
the time of payment may be varied. They shall notify the 
Superintendent, before the time of making the pay-roll for any 
period, of any loss of time with the reason therefor. 

SUPERVISORS 

L. At the beginning of each school year Supervisors, 
acting with the Superintendent of Schools, shall prepare a 
program indicating the time to be given to each school, and a 
general outline of the work to be done in each department. 

2. Each teacher shall be notified of the time when Su- 
pervisors may be expected at her school, and this time shall 
not be changed except for urgent reasons and after due notice. 

3. Supervisors shall notify the Superintendent of any 
loss of time or failure to meet engagements at the schools. 

PUPIXS 

1. Pupils shall be considered under the joint jurisdiction 
of teachers and parents when on the way to or from school. 
They are not to leave the vicinity of the school buildings or 
grounds without permission of teacher or principal. 

2. No pupil shall enter any hall or room other than the 
one where he regularly belongs except by the special permis- 
sion of his teacher. They shall not assemble about the school 
buildings at any unreasonable time before the opening of 
school. After dismissal they shall go at once to their homes 
unless they remain by consent of teachers. The Principal 
ma}^ make any special rules necessary to carry the provisions 
of this section into effect, subject to the approval of the 
Superintendent. 

3. No pupil under the age of five years shall be admitted 



to school, and no pupil under the age of seven years shall be 
admitted by teachers to the first grade, after October 1st in 
any year, unless he is qualified to enter the classes already 
formed. But the Superintendent of Schools may admit such 
a pupil, when, after investigation, he finds that the conditions 
seem to justify such action. 

JANITORS 

1. Janitors shall have the immediate care of school 
grounds, buildings, fences, apparatus, etc., and shall perform 
their duties under the direction of teachers and school officials. 

2. They shall report to the Principal and School Officials 
any injury or defacing of the school property. 

3. They shall so manage the heating apparatus that a 
temperature of 68 degrees Fahrenheit shall be secured in each 
room, at least fifteen minutes before the opening of the morn- 
ing session. This temperature shall be maintained as far as 
possible during the day. 

GENERAL 

1 . The hours for the school sessions of the grammar 
grades shall be from 9.00 A. M. to 12.00 M., and from 1.15 
to 3.30 P. M. The sessions of the primary grades shall be 
determined by the School Officials in accordance with the 
needs and conditions of each school. 

A recess of not more than fifteen minutes shall be allowed 
in each half -day session. w 

2. No circulars or advertisements shall be distributed in 
the school nor shall any collection or subscription be taken 
without the consent of the Superintendent. 

3. The use of tobacco in any form is strictly forbidden 
in or about the school bnilding. 

Approved by the School Committee of Hatfield, Mar. 1, 1912 



h3 
o 

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03 


Center Gram. 
Center Inter. 
Cen. 1st Prim 
Cen. 2d Prim 
Hill Gram. 
Hill Primary 
W T est Gram. 
West Prim. 
North Gram. 
North Prim. 
Bradstreet 
Su. of Music 
Su. of Draw. 


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p ^ rr> p <T> <t> 0> £ ^ »— p 

P; ££££;£ % £ 

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Salaries 
Per Week 




O 05 M tf^ M 


Grade I 




M tO 
M -O «^ O M 


Grade II 




M M 
rf^ OS 00 OT ^ 


Grade III 


to 


to 

tO M M 


Grade IV 


to 

M 


-^ to -3 00 


Grade V 


to 


M 
OS M M 


Grade VI 


to 

CO 


to 

M 00 M M 


Grade VII 


M 

OS 


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00 05 


Grade VIII 


M 


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at to 


Grade IX 


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tOtOMOOMOOOOOO^tOtO 

1 WHCOOOlCCOlOt^CDOl 


Totals 



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SO 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TOWN OFFICERS 



OF THE 







■& 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE 



Year Ending March 1, 1913 



Herald Job Print 
N or i h am pton 



Finance Committee 



To the Voters of the Town of Hatfield \ 

Gentlemen: — Your Finance Committee submit the fol- 
lowing report: 

WE RECOMMEND : 



Article 5- Highways. 

Ordinary repairs on Highways and 

Bridges, $1500 00 

Repairs on sewers, 100 00 



Article 6. Necessary town expenses. 
Contingencies, 

Care Memorial Hall, 

Bonds, Town Officers, 

Schools, 

School House Repairs, 

Electric lights, already installed, 

Water rates, 

Salaries, Town Officers, 

Insurance, 



$800 00 

150 00 

50 00 

7100 00 

500 00 
3200 00 

500 00 
1400 00 

100 00 



$1600 00 



Interest, 250 00 

$14050 00 

Article 8. Memorial Day, 75 00 

Article 9. Town Poor, 1000 00 

Article 11. Care of Cemeteries, 100 00 

Article 12. Public Library, 350 00 

Article 13. Tuition Smith Academy, 1000 00 

Article 14. Firemen's Muster, 75 00 

Article 16. School Physicians, 100 00 

Article 17. Smith Industrial School, 100 00 

Article 20 Sidewalk, North Hatfield, 100 00 

Article 21. Oiling Stone Roads, 350 00 

Article 22. The sum of $6000 for stone roads 
on School and Prospect Sts., from Academy Corner 
West to Mill Bridge, including the curve connect- 
ing Prospect St., with the Depot Road, and the 
curve around the old cemetery connecting Prospect 
with Elm St. Of this sum $4000 is to be assessed 
on the polls and estates for the year 1913, and $2000 
to be appropriated from the balance in the Treasury 
and in favor of the town. $4000 00 

Article 23. That the sum of $5000 be raised 
and appropriated for the purpose * of building the 
Bradstreet stone road, said sum to be assessed on 
the polls and estates of the town in the years of 1914 
and 1915. 

Article 31. For resurfacing Depot Road, 500 00 

$23400 00 



5 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. E. Porter, John McHugh, Jr., 

John J. Betsold, Daniel P. Sheehan, 

M. W. Boyle, Chas. W. Wade, 

A. R. Breor, O. E. Belden, 

Thaddeus Graves, H, W. Wolfram, 

John F. Day. L. H. Kingsley, 

Finance Committee. 



Articles in the Town Warrant for 
Town Meeting, March 17, 1913. 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Article 2. To choose all necessary town officers for the 
ensuing year: Town Clerk; three Selectmen; one Assessor 
for 3 years; Town Treasurer; one School Committee for 3 
years; one School Committee for 1 year; one Water Commis- 
sioner for 3 years; one Sinking Fund Commissioner for 3 
years; one Trustee of Public Library for 3 years; Auditor; 
Tree Warden; Elector, under the Will of Oliver Smith; Tax 
Collector; six Constables; and to vote on the question 
— "Yes'' or "No" — Shall Licenses be granted for the sale of 
intoxicating liquors in this town? All the foregoiug to be 
voted for on one ballot. 

The Polls will be opened at ten o'clock in the forenoon 
and be kept open at least four hours, and for as much longer 
time as a majority of the voters present shall direct, but in no 
case shall they be kept open after the hour of sunset. 

Article 3. To hear the reports of the various town of- 
ficers and act thereon. 

Article 4. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5. To take action in relation to maintenance 

6 



and repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing year, and 
raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 6. To take action in relation to raising money 
and appropriating same to defray the necessary expenses of 
the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7. To see what action the town will take in 
relation to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing year. 

Article 8. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Memorial Day. 

Article 9. To take action in relation to the support of 
the poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appropriate 
money for the same. 

Article 1.0. To revise and accept the list of Jurors re- 
ported by the Selectmen. 

Article 11. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the care of cemeteries for the ensuing year. 

Article 12. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the Public Library for the ensuing year. 

Article 13. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children in 
Smith Academy, who are of suitable age and attainments to 
attend High School. 

Article 14. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 15. To see if the town will authorize the Treas- 
urer, with the approval of the Selectmen, or a majority 
thereof, to borrow, during the current municipal year, 
beginning March 1st, 1913, in anticipation of the taxes for 
said municipal year, such sums of money as may be neces- 
sary for the current expenses of the town, giving notes of 
the town therefor, payable within one year from the dates 
thereof. 



8 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the employment of one or more School Physicians, 
in accordance with provisions of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906. 

Article 17. To see if the town will raise and appropriate 
money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield children at- 
tending- the Smith Industrial School at Northampton. 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to appoint another 
Finance Committee to act for the ensuing year. 

Article 19- To see if the towu will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for purchasing any supplies or apparatus 
needed by the Fire Department. 

Article 20- To see if the town will vote to build a gravel 
walk on West side of road, South from Crafts' corner to 
school house in North Hatfield, and raise and appropriate 
money for the same. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to oil the stone 
roads of the town the ensuing year, and raise and appro- 
priate money for the same. 

Article 22. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for building a permanent road of stone on 
School and Prospect streets, from Academy corner to the 
Mill Bridge, including the curve connecting Prospect street 
with the Depot Road, and the curve around the old cemetery 
connecting Prospect with Elm street. 

Article 23 . To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to build a permanent road of stone on 
the Depot Road in Bradstreet, starting at the water tank and 
going West; money to be raised as recommended by your 
Finance Committee. 

Article 24. To see if the town will instruct the Select- 
men to confer with the Conn. Valley St. Ry. Co., in regard to 



9 

reduction of fares between the Whately and Northampton 
lines- 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to straighten and establish the bounds of the 
"Great Ponset" Road from a point where the said road leaves 
Middle Division, West to a point near Mill River. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to place ar 
electric light at the ferry landing, and raise and appropriate 
money for the same. 

Arficle 27. To see if the town will vote to extend its 
street lighting system through the Straights Road, from the 
Depot Road North to the Whately line, and raise and appro- 
priate money for the same. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to go in with the 
Conn. Valley St. Ry. Co., in building a permanent bridge at 
the Causeway below Bradstreet, and raise and appropriate 
money for the same. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to appropriate, 
or add to by raising, the sum of $382.26 now in Savings 
Bank, proceeds from sale of Silas Porter property, for the 
purpose of improving said property on Main street. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money for the protection of its shade 
trees. 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate money for resurfacing the Depot Road, from the 
fountain tank West to John S. Deinlein's. 



Selectmen's Report. 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

Gentlemen: — In accordance with the requirements of the 
Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report for the year 
ending March 1st, 1913, is respectfully submitted. 



STATE AID. 

Paid to three persons, $120 00 

POOR EXPENDITURES. 

A. J. Bonneville, med. attendance, $106 00 

Chas. A. Byrne, med. attendance, 31 25 

Dickinson Hospital, 13 00 

H. D. Smith, coal, 42 81 

Thos. P. Fitzgerald, rent, 84 00 

Mary ]. Proulx, rent, 120 00 

L. J. Pelissier, supplies, 126 48 

M.J. Ryan, supplies, 236 88 

Mrs. F. J. Morgan, board, 114 00 

Est. A. L. Strong, wood, 13 00 

Crittenden & Munson, ptg., 10 00 

Aid, 12 00 

io 



11 



Rent, 

Westfield Sanatorium, 

City of Holyoke, 

City of Northampton, 

Shumway & Riley, repairs, 



$ 25 


00 


12 


00 


103 


35 


157 


75 


10 


70 


$1218 22 



OLD BILLS. 

Chas- A. Byrne, School Physician, 1911, 
George Eberlein, labor, 
M.J. Proulx, labor and supplies old sewer, 
Thaddeus Graves, services S. Com. 1911, 



$100 00 


27 


85 


57 


10 


20 


00 



$204 95 



SEWER REPAIRS. 

O. Belden & Sons, labor and tile, 

A. L. Smith, brick, 

W- H. Riley & Co., tile, 



$36 81 

5 60 

6 93 

$49 34 



TOWN OFFICERS. 



John C. Ryan, services as Selectman, 1911, $150 00 

Thos. J. Ryan, " " " " 75 00 

John J. Betsold, " " " " 75 00 

D. W. Wells, " " Water Commissioner, 10 00 

M. J. Proulx, " " " 10 00 

A. R. Breor, ■• «« " 10 00 



12 



D. E. Holley, 


services 


as Ballot Clerk, 


$ 6 00 


CI. Stowell, 


< ( 


<< <i 


9 00 


Scott Harris, 


i ( 


< < < ' 


6 00 


A. R. Allaire, 


" 


i i " 


5 00 


John F. Day, 


i i 


" " 


3 00 


A. C. Bardwell, 


' ' 


t < ( ( 


3 00 


E. W. Strong, 


t <, 


Assessor, 


61 25 


P. W. Mullins, 


1 1 


^ i ( < 


75 00 


L. H. Kingsley, 


i i 


« i i < 


153 75 


E. L. Graves, 


i < 


" Tax Collector, 1911, 


200 00 


V. H. Keller, 


' i 


' ' Auditor, 


10 00 


L. H. Kingsley, 


" 


Registrar of Voters, 


10 00 


Thos. W. Ryan 




a a 


10 00 


S. F. Billings, 


t ' 


i < i i 


10 00 


R. W. Weber, 


I I 


it ( < 


10 00 


A. R. Breor, 


» t 


School Committee, 


25 00 


John F. Day, 


i i 


H <i 


20 00 


Thaddeus Graves, 


U a 


15 00 


L. H Kingsley, 


Town Clerk, Clerk Bd. Selectmen, 


400 00 


L. H. Kingsley, 


Town Treasurer, 


100 00 


Chas. K. Mortor 


l, services 


as Elector, 


10 00 


L. J. Pelissier, s 


srvices as 


Fish Warden, 


5 00 




$1477 00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Fred Winzel, storing hose wagon, 

Thos. M. Day, " 

H. W. Marsh, " 

C H. Crafts, 

James Mullins, Sen. 

J. J. Betsold. 



$5 00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 



$30 00 



13 



SCHOOL ST. SIDEWALK 



H. D. Smith, cement, 

E. E. Davis, surveying, 

Birnie, Adams & Ruxton, labor, 



$320 45 

13 00 

531 21 

$864 66 



CARE MEMORIAL HALL. 



H. D. Smith, coal, 
E. J- McCarthy, repairs, 
Amherst Gas Co., light, 
L. H. Kingsley, janitor, 



$62 


16 


16 


78 


1 


80 


75 


00 



$155 74 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES— ORDINARY REPAIRS. 



H. Shumway, 


team 


and labor, 


$218 40 


D. P. Sheehan, 


< < 






167 62 


M. W Boyle, 


i i 






2 64 


M. H. D wight, 


n 






15 00 


H. D. Smith, 


i ( 






27 75 


J. L. Proulx, 


i i 






4 00 


J. C. Ryan, 


i < 






50 00 


H. E. Bard well 


< < 




and sand, 


6 50 


J. L. Day, 


i i 






36 00 


J. W. Kiley, 


< < 






2 00 


L. H. Wight, 


< ( 






1 50 


Tiros. J Ryan, 






! Supt. 


228 50 


L. J. Casten, 








13 75 


J. L. Sheehan, 








74 25 


John Fusek, 








46 76 



14 



Jacob Gies, labor, 

Geo. M. Franklin, 

John R. McGrath, 

Stefan Skibicki, 

Victor Wasko, 

Mike Bemban, 

Mike Pashek, 

Wm. Fox, 

Thos- Karpenskie, 

Stephen Vachula, 

Geo. Budzjn, 

B. E. Davis, inspecting bridges, 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 

F. W. Prince, gravel, 

Good Roads Mfg. Co., plow, 

Buffalo Steam Roller Co., rep. 

Wm. P. Boyle, painting, 

E. J. McCarthy, rep. 
Geo. Eberlein, ex. 

Est. A. L. Strong, wood and plank, 

F. E. Wilkie, sand, 
B. & M. R. ft. 
Foster Bros., sup. 

W. H. Riley &Co., sup 



$ 65 03 


30 


64 


2 00 


11 


38 


11 


37 


5 


25 


1 


75 


1 


75 


3 


50 


1 


75 


6 


00 


8 


00 


45 


36 


5 


60 


22 50 


7 


10 


9 


85 


3 


73 


1 


25 


304 


10 


5 


00 


1 


06 


14 


87 


11 


42 


$1504 93 



OILING STREETS. 



American Car Sprinkler Co , 



$394 46 



INSURANCE. 



Harry L. Howard, 



$183 75 



15 



BONDS- TOWN OFFICERS. 



Wm. M. Cochran, bond Treas., 
H. L. Howard, bond Coll. 



$32 00 
25 00 

$57 00 



STATE ROAD REPAIRS. 



H. Shumway, team and labor, 


$107 42 


D. P. Sheehan, 




228 95 


Geo. M. Donelson, " 


and sand, 


165 47 


C. H. Crafts, 




13 00 


M. H. Dwight, 




18 00 


Edw. A. Ryan, 




4 82 


H. D. Smith, 




45 00 


J. L. Proulx, 




75 25 


J. C. Ryan, 




75 75 


John F. Day, 




9 00 


Thos. J. Ryan, 


' Supt. 


266 50 


L- J. Casten, 




21 50 


J. L. Sheehan, 




106 50 


Geo. Budzjn, 




6 00 


John Fusek, 




22 56 


Geo. Kreeler, 




10 32 


Frank Wesolowski, 




7 00 


Victor Wasko, 




17 50 


Paul Turgilewicz, 




12 25 


Mike Pashek, 




10 07 


Mike Bemban, 




28 44 


Stefan Skibicki, . 




8 32 


Jacob Gies, 




40 25 


Geo. M. Franklin, 




39 38 


Thos. Karpenskie, 




7 88 


Geo. B. McClellan, sand, 




16 90 



16 

Fred L. Graves, sand, $ 9 00 

Lyinan A. Crafts, " 4 60 

L. W. Swift, " 8 00 

H. Bai dwell, " 8 10 

Lem. Graves, 1 00 

Alex Donnis, 1 20 

E. W. Strong, " 1 80 

A. Douglas, brushes, 1 65 

J. A. Sullivan, sup. 3 00 



$1402 38 



TREE WARDEN. 

Geo. Eberlein, two iron rods, $5 70 

F. W. Schepp, rods in trees and trimming, 6 50 

P.J. Whalen, labor, 29 50 



41 70 



ELECTRICITY IN TOWN BUILDINGS- 

L. E. Warner, wiring and fixtures in Town Hall, $80 00 

L. E Warner, " " Mem. Hall, 175 00 



$255 00 



CONTINGENCIES. 



.^rald Job Print, printing reports, $118 50 

L J. Bonneville, fumigating, 33 00 

A. J. Bonneville, returning births, 7 00 

Chas A. Byrne, returning births, 8 50 

Chas. A. Byrne, fumigating, 29 00 



17 

Est. A. L. Strong, wood for Town Hall, 
John J. Betsold, wood, 
H. W. Marsh, repairs Bradstreet Hall, 
E. L. Graves, envelopes, postage on reports, 
J. W. Heffernan, ledger, 
C. H. Chase, transfers of real estate, 
Nat'l Blank Book Co., order book, 
Metcalf & Co., printing ballots, 
Crittenden & Mnnson, printing, 
Amherst Gas Co., electricity, 
Johnson's Book Store, Coll- book, 
C. T. Bagnalls, tax bills, 
J. M. Strong, posting bills, 
Geo. P. O'Donnell, collecting, 
Carters Ink Co., ink, 
Scott Harris, care clock and Town Hall, 
Geo. Eberlein, police duty, ) 

C. I Stowell, care Wilkie plot, 
E. J. McCarthy, rep. Town Hall, 
C. B. Dolge Co., disinfectant, 
G. W. Todd Co, ck. stamp, 
E. S. Warner, inspection carcasses, 
E. S. Warner, inspection animals and barns, 
L- H. Kingsley, recording, indexing, births, mar- 
riages and deaths, 
L. H- Kingsley, serving Warrants, notifying officers, 
L. H. Kingsley, fares, postage and ex. paid, 
A. R. Breor, police duty, 
M.J. Proulx, 
S. W. Kingsley, 



> 11 


00 


22 


00 


50 


00 


19 


66 


2 


25 


11 


25 


9 


00 


11 


50 


10 


25 


19 


20 


4 25 


5 


13 


3 


00 


40 


87 


1 


70 


45 


00 


2 


00 


3 


00 


1 


98 


3 


50 


25 


00 


138 


60 


158 


00 


50 


80 


18 


00 


9 


31 


2 


00 


13 


20 


7 


00 



$894 45 



18 




SCHOOL PHYSICIANS. 




A. J. Bonneville, 


$50 00 


Chas. A. Byrne, 


50 00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



J. L. Proulx, 
Wm. R. Cutter, 
M. H. Dwight, 
H. D. Smith, 
D. P. Sheehan, 
Sam. Osley, 



$100 00 



Underwood & Underwood, pictures, 


$12 96 


Bridgman & Lyman, books, 


122 03 


Fitzgerald Book Co., books, 


10 00 


S. W. Ferguson, asst., 


1 50 


CM. Barton, services as librarian, 


75 00 


catalogueing, 


8 50 


cash paid, 


3 10 


repairing books, 


50 10 


Wednesday openings, 


18 50 


books to and from stations, 


18 00 


J. H. Howard, use of team, 


5 25 


Balance for books, 


22 81 


Mrs. Shea, cleaning, 


2 25 



$350 00 



DEPOT STONE ROAD. 



H. Shumway, team and labor, $107 34 

42 00 
20 00 
40 90 
51 73 
109 15 
24 00 



19 



M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 

J. C. Ryan, 

J. J. Betsold, 

Thos. J. Ryan, 

L. J. Casten, 

J. L. Sheehan, 

Mike Bemban, 

Nicholas Staszko, 

John Fusek, 

Victor Wasko, 

Jacob Gies, 

John Dubil, 

Geo. M. Franklin, 

Connie Babinski, 

Thos. Karpenskie, 

John Tendrucek 

Peter 

John Kopska, 
Stan Mokeski, 
Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 
J. S. Lane & Son, stone, 
Wm. P. Boyle, painting, 
City of Northampton, stone, 
B. & M. R., two cars of cinders 
J, A. Sullivan, sup., 
J. E. Stoddard, posts, 



Supt. 



$ 2 00 


44 


00 


4 


90 


124 00 


97 


50 


75 


00 


21 


00 


10 


50 


32 10 


35 


88 


50 


35 


6 


57 


37 


22 


7 


00 


7 


87 


3 


50 


15 


75 


17 


50 


3 


50 


84 42 


849 


64 


38 


50 


213 


80 


30 


00 


3 


24 


13 


34 


$2224 20 



BRADSTREET FILL. 



H. Shumway, team and labor, 


$20 00 


Edw. A. Ryan, 


6 33 


H. D. Smith, 


32 00 


F.P.Jones, and loam, 


68 00 



J. C. Ryan, 
J. L. Proulx, 
D. P. Sheehan, 
Wm. W. Gore, 
Jas. L. Day, 
H. E. Bard well, 
Thos. J. Ryan, 
J. L. Sheehan, 
Geo. Budzjn, 
John Fusek, 

Jacob Gies, 

Mike Bemban, 

Victor Wasko, 

Geo. M. Franklin, 

Paul Turgilewicz, 

Mike Pashek, 

Stefan Skibicki, 

No. 1, 

Peter Kristiansen, 

Peter Fox, 

Est. A. L. Strong, posts 



20 



team and labor, 



Supt. 



$ 20 00 


12 


00 


24 


00 


4 00 


4 


00 


12 


00 


38 


00 


9 


25 


4 


00 


10 


50 


17 


50 


9 


62 


12 


25 


7 


00 


1 


75 


8 


75 


5 


25 


4 


37 


1 


75 


1 


75 


75 00 



$408 87 



ELM STREET STONE ROAD. 



H. Shumway, team 


and labor, 


$224 75 


D. P. Sheehan, " 


<< 


190 80 


Dennis Whalen, 


• < 


120 00 


Alfred E. Breor, " 


i i 


69 00 


John C. Ryan, 


. i 


130 40 


H. D. Smith, 


" coal and sand, 


191 20 


M. H. Dwight, " 


< < 


44 00 


John M. -Strong, 


i i 


32 00 


Benj. M.Warner," 


< ( 


13 00 


JohnW.Kiley, " 


u 


61 60 



21 



M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 

Wm. E. Boyle, " 

John F. Day, 

Wm. W. Gore, " 

D. P. McGrath, " 

L- J. Casten, 

Thos. J. Ryan, Supt. 

J. L. Sheehan, 

Geo. Budzjn, 

Geo. M. Franklin, 

Peter Kristiansen, 

Henry Jansen, 

Peter Fox, 

Jacob Gies, 

Walenti Bnnda, 

Mike Karakula, 

Chas. Waskiewicz, 

Thos. W. Ryan, sand, 

John Borowski, sand, 

Edson W. Strong, slabs, 

City of Northampton, stone, 

J. S. Lane & Son, stone, 



17 60 
8 00 

36 00 
118 00 

26 00 
161 00 
194 00 
109 13 

67 00 

77 00 
67 37 
22 75 

7 00 

78 75 

18 37 
21 00 
26 25 
52 90 

3 60 

4 00 
300 00 

2031 87 



WATER RATES. 



$4524 34 



Superintendent, 



$500 00 



MEMORIAL DAY. 



Chas. K. Morton, 



75 00 



STREET LIGHTING. 
Amherst Gas Company, 



$3735 7-6 



22 



MAPLE STREET STONE ROAD. 



H. Sh.um.way, team, and 


1 laboi 


"» 


$146 40 


D. P.Sheehan, ' 


< ( 




134 00 


H.D.Smith, 


i < 


sand and coal, 


118 77 


John C. Ryan, 


i i 




76 00 


D. P. McGrath, " 


i < 




14 00 


John L. Proulx, 


< ( 




32 00 


James L. Day, 


< i 




32 00 


P. T. Boyle, 


i t 




102 25 


Wm. W. Gore, " 


i < 




70 00 


James L. Boyle, 


(< 




16 00 


M.W.Boyle, 


(< 




32 00 


F. H. Bardwell, " 


< i 




20 00 


Chas. L. Warner,'' 


i < 




16 00 


Geo. A. Billings, " 


i ( 




10 00 


Alex Kozash, 


t < 




21 00 


A. W. Morton, " 


< < 




6 00 


Wm. E. Boyle, " 


c t 




4 00 


Ernest Godin, 


< i 




2 00 


David Billings, 


i ( 




4 00 


John F. Day, 


t < 




24 00 


Thos. J. Ryan, 


«< 


Supt. 


105 38 


Lewis J. Casten, 


" 


steam roller, 


87 50 


John L. Sheehan. 


c < 




56 25 


Geo. Budzjn, 


( < 




42 00 


Ceo. M. Franklin, 


< i 




16 62 


Jacob Gies, 


i < 




29 75 


Peter Kristiansen, 


( < 




35 00 


Peter Fox, 


< < 




11 38 


John Borowski, sand, 






32 50 


City of Northampton, stone, 




828 60 


J. S. Lane & Sons, stone, 






147 54 


J. E. Porter, cement, 






11 25 


Northampton Iron Works, 


castings, 


24 00 


Foster Bros., sup., 






6 50 



23 



A. L. Smith, brick, 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile, 



SMITH INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 
Tuition, 

SMITH ACADEMY. 

David Billings, Treas., 

CEMETERY APPROPRIATION. 

F. H. Bardwell, Treas., 

HIGHWAYS— SPECIAL REPAIRS. 

James P. Kelly, work on common, 

Chas. I. Stowell, work on common, 

E. J. McCarthy, railing School St., 

Shumway & Riley, bubblers, 

New Eng. Metal Culvert Co., culvert, 

Thos- J. Ryan, labor, 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 

B. & M. Rd, freight, 

Fred T. Bardwell, team and labor, 

E. N. Dickinson, team and labor, 

Archie P. Graves, team and labor, 

Merrick Lumber Co-, lumber, 

Frank L. Betsold, labor, 

M.J. Ryan, supplies, 

S. W. Kingsley, labor, 

John J. Breor, labor Ferry road, 



14 40 
17 00 



$2346 09 



$33 33 



$1000 00 



$100 00 



$14 00 


25 


00 


79 


87 


26 


83 


48 


00 


7 


00 


9 


44 


13 


60 


25 


50 


45 


27 


42 


00 


30 


24 


68 


00 


38 


82 


27 


50 


5 


00 



$506 07 



24 



SCHOOL EXPENDITURES. 



Miss Mary J. Mulcahy, teaching, 

Margaret A. Ryan, 

Sarah V. Kiley, 

Constance C. Breor, 

Mary Decker, 

Katherine W. Day, 

Veronica R. Driscoll. 

Mary F. Keating, 

Christine Hibbard, 

Nellie T. O'Brien, 

Alice R. Sweeney, 

Marian C- Billings, 

Grace Alexander, 

Anna Laughlin, 

Harriet M. Partridge, 

Jennie V. Sargent, 

Cora H. Bean, 

Elizabeth M. Kiley, 

Margaret Partenheimer, " 

Gladys V. Rand, 

Pearl N.Sadd, 

Margaret Woods, 
Mr., Walter C. Wood, 

Stephen W. Ferguson, 
Miss Beatrice J. Hibbard, drawing, 

Charlotte Woods, music, 

MaudE. Boyle, 
Clinton J. Richards, services Supt., 
Clinton J. Richards, sundries, etc., 
Katherine Flynn, janitor, 
Scott Harris, 
James P. Kelly, 
John Salvas, 
Mrs. A. Hilbert, 



$158 60 

464 60 

432 00 

399 50 

429 60 

111 00 

143 00 

143 00 

416 60 

419 00 

22 40 

33 60 

5 00 

18 20 

80 00 

22 40 

205 40 

220 00 

218 00 

253 00 

228 00 

24 00 

72 00 
36 00 
52 00 
48 00 
88 00 

599 61 
42 99 
116 18 
156 00 
152 00 
113 63 

73 50 



25 

C- M. Wickles, sweeping, $ 49 50 

Mrs. John Merrick, cleaning, 7 50 

Mary Kubosiak, " 3 00 

H. D. Smith, coal, 723 48 

John J. Betsold, wood, 55 00 

Leon Zeskie, wood, 8 00 

Fred T. Bardwell, wood, 13 50 

Riley & Kipp, fire escapes, 510 00 

Thaddeus Graves, cleaning yard, 10 00 

O. Belden's Sons, care yard, 10 00 

E. J. McCarthy, plumbing, 137 77 

Shumway & Riley, plumbing, 23 42 

James Powers, mason, 42 00 

J. H. Howard, supplies, 24 36 

W. P. Boyle, repairing and painting, 203 60 

Sawyer Crystal Blue Co., supplies, 4 50 

Crittenden & Munson, printing, 21 16 

D. C Heath & Co., supplies, 20 04 
Conn. Valley St. Ry. Co., tickets, 120 00 
H. Mifflin & Co., books, 16 48 
Ginn & Co., books, 66 87 

E. E. Babb & Co., books, 144 17 
J. L. Hammett Co., books, 115 19 
C. B. Dolge Co., supplies, 10 00 
J. H. Quinn, supplies, 78 50 
Newson & Co., " 30 61 
C. Scribner's Sons, 75 
Silver Burdett Co.. " 47 20 
Educational Pub. Co., " 3 65 
B. & M. Rd, freight, 1 75 
Bridgman & Lyman, supplies, 3 15 
B- H. Sanborn & Co., 63 39 
Rand McN ally Co., " 16 12 
Mrs. G. P. Breor, census, 18 00 
Wright & Potter, supplies, 63 
Funk & Wagnall, " 10 80 



26 



Fred H. Brown, atlas, 


$ 6 00 


W. L. Nolan, writing, 


2 00 


Am. Seating Co., seats, 


63 40 


Scott, Forseman & Co., supplies, 


1 83 


Am. Book Co., books, 


3 84 


A. N. Palmer Co., 


28 50 


Stefan Vochula, trans- scholars, 


5 00 


M. C. Strong, 


5 00 


Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 


49 24 


John B. Bitner, labor, 


15 60 


Foster Bros., supplies, 


3 43 


Geo. Eberlein, labor, 


8 85 


Fred W. Schepp, repairs, 


3 00 


S. W. Kingsley. 


8 50 


John F. Day, labor and ex. paid, 


26 16 


A. R. Breor, 


19 04 




$8,860 29 



RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN. 



State Aid, 


$ 120 00 


Poor, 


1218 22 


Town Officers, 


1497 00 


Contingencies, 


894 45 


Schools, 


8860 29 


School Physicians, 


100 00 


Highways and Bridges, ordinary repairs, 


1504 93 


Memorial Hall, 


155 74 


Public Library, 


350 00 


Bradstreet Fill, 


408 87 


Insurance, 


183 75 


Bonds — Town Officers, 


57 00 


Street Lighting, 


3735 73 


Old Bills, 


184 95 



27 



Water Rates, 
Tree Warden, 
Wiring of Town Buildings, 
Memorial Day, 
State Road Repairs, 
Highways — Special Repairs, 
Depot Stone Road, 
Sewers — Repairs of 
Smith Industrial School, 
Sidewalk — School St., 
Oiling Streets, 
Elm Street Stone Road, 
Maple Street Stone Road, 
Tuition Smith Academy, 
Care Cemeteries, 
Fire Department, 



$ 500 00 


41 


70 


255 


00 


75 


00 


1402 


38 


506 


07 


2224 


20 


49 


34 


33 


33 


864 


66 


394 


46 


4524 


34 


2346 


09 


1000 


00 


100 


00 


3^ 


00 


$33,617 50 



List of Appropriations voted to be raised at the Annual 
Town Meeting, held March 18th, 1912. 



all ordinary repairs on Highways and Bridges 

extra work on Highways 

repairs on Sewers 

unfinished work at Bradstreet Fill 

Contingencies 

care of Memorial Building 

Bonds for Town Officers 

Schools, and Dog Fund 

Electric Lights already installed 

Water Rates 

Salaries Town Officers 

Insurance 

Interest 



$1500 


for 


500 


i ' 


100 


i < 


600 


< < 


800 


< i 


150 


<i 


50 


< i 


6100 


< i 


3200 


< i 


500 


i c 


1400 


( < 


200 


I ( 


350 


( ( 



28 



$75 for Memorial Day 


800 ' 


Town Poor 


100 • 


care of Cemeteries 


350 ' 


Public Library 


300 ' 


School Supervisors 


1000 ' 


Tuition Smith Academy 


75 ' 


Fireman's Muster 


100 4 


School Physicians 


200 ' 


Tuition Smith Industrial School 


500 ' 


Sidewalk repairs on School Street 


500 * 


Fire Escapes and Repairs — school buildings 


3000 ' 


' Permanent Road on any part of Maple and Elm 




Streets 



22,450 Total amount to be assessed on the polls and 
estates of the town for 1912. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. E. PORTER, 

JOHN J. BETSOLD, 

M. W. BOYLE, 

Selectmen. 



I have this day examined the books of the Selectmen 
and find them correct. 



V. H. KELLER, Auditor. 



Hatfield, March 5, 1913. 



29 



LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECT- 
MEN OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD -1913 



Name 
Boyle, William E. 
Boyle, James L. 
Boyle, William P. 
Boyle, George A. 
Bel den, Oscar E. 
Billings, Louis A. 
Bard well, Arthur C. 
Carl, Henry W. 
Crafts, Edson S. 
Dickinson. Edward N. 
Doppman, Adam F. 
Dippolt, George 
Fitzgerald, David L. 
Graves, Murray B. 
Jubenville, Eugene 
Kiley, John W. 
Lovett, Charles 
Morton, Albert W. 
Mullins, Jr. James 
Newman, Joseph S. 
O'Dea, Thomas M. 
Ryan, Matthew J. 
Wade, Charles W. 
Warner, C. Edward 
Wight, Leland H. 
Waite, Charles H. 



Occupation 
Farmer 

Painter 
Farmer j 



Carpenter 
Farmer 



Mechanic 
Farmer 



Merchant 
Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in account with the town of 
Hatfield. 



Dr. 



To balance in Treasury, 
To cash rec'd from E. L 



$1201 00 

Graves, Coll. (1911) 3319 43 

" (1912) 23837 93 

Treas. Water Commissioners, 3861 67 

District Court fines, 187 42 

Auctioneer's License, 1 00 

Slaughter Licenses, 3 00 

High Sheriff— fines, 11 00 

Pool License, 2 00 

Refunding Dog Fund, 115 70 

Rent of Town Hall, 27 00 

City of Boston, 58 50 

Town of Whately, tuition, 102 66 

City of Northampton, tuition, 282 62 

State Highway Commission, repairs, 1408 13 

Elm St., 1500 00 

Maple St., 1000 00 

Corporation Tax, , 237 55 

National Bank Tax, 782 60 

Street Ry. Tax, 225 71 

State Aid, 116 00 

30 



31 



To cash rec'd Tuition Industrial School, $ 100 00 

Supt. of Schools, 491 09 

Income Mass. School Fund, 792 04 

Inspection of Animals, 41 50 

C. J. Richards, supplies sold, 3 62 

T. Graves, " " 2 85 

Wm. P. Boyle, stone, 10 50 

H. D. Smith, brick, 5 60 

C. S. Shattuck, sidewalk, 70 91 

Emma D. Webber, " 20 00 

Ge©. Eberlein, tile and laying- pipe, 18 00 

T. Graves, " 4 80 

Wm. S. Murphy, sewer entrance, 33 00 

M.J. Proulx, " " 33 00 

F. J. Shafer, " " and .tile, 40 96 

Val. Parada, bal. " " 20 00 

Thos. W. Ryan, " " 33 00 

Chas. Winter, bal. " " 21 95 

H. LaMountain, and tile, 40 56 

John J. Breor, tile, 4 20 

Entrance to sewer, Bridge Lane, 33 00 

A. R. Breor, tickets sold, 25 80 



To cash rec'd from Temporary Loans, 
Northampton Institution for Savings, 





$40127 


30 


$6000 






4000 


$10000 


nn 




Uu 



$50127 30 



Cr. 



By cash paid Selectmen's orders, 

Interest on Water Bonds, 
District Court fees, 



$33617 50 

2000 00 

107 93 



32 



By cash paidB ureau of Statistics, 

Interest on temporary loans, 

County tax, 

State tax, 

Treas. Sinking Fund, 
Balance in Treasury, 



$ 6 00 
179 65 
1916 69 
2445 00 
861 67 
992 86 



By cash paid Temporary Notes, 
Northampton Institution for Savings, 



(( < < 



6000 00 
2000 00 



$50127 30 



IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR, 



(1911 TAXES.) 



Dr. 



To cash received, 


$3319 43 


To Assessors' orders Abmt., 


197 40 


To discount on taxes, 


3 00 




— — $3519 83 



Cr. 



By uncollected taxes, 
Interest on taxes, 
Addition to Warrant, 



$3448 63 

69 20 

2 00 



$3519 83 



33 

(1912 TAXES.) 

Dr. 

To cash received, 
Uncollected taxes, 
Discount on taxes, 
Assessors' orders of Abatements, 



Cr, 



$23837 93 

3167 02 

451 50 

147 98 



$27604 43 



By Assessors' Warrant, 


$25829 07 


Addition to Warrant, 


1727 74 


Interest collected, 


47 62 




$27604 43 



I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collector, and 
find that he has been credited by the Treasurer, with the 
amount of $3,319.43 of the taxes of 1911; and $23,837.93 of 
the taxes of 1912. 

VERNET H. KELLER, 

Hatfield, March 5, 1913. Auditor. 

WATER SINKING FUND. 



Dr. 

To thirty years four per cent Water Bonds, $50000 00 

Cr. 



By Sinking Fund, 



$19024 18 



34 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT. 

Dr. 

Balance Note outstanding, $2000 00 

Bills due March 1— estimated, 600 00 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, 1912, 
Due from State Aid, 

Inspection of animals, 

State — Smith School, 
Sewer Assessments, 
Balance in Treasury, 

Balance in favor of town, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer. 



I have examined the books and accounts of the Treasurer 
of the town of Hatfield for the year ending March 1st, 1913, 
and find them correct. I find Selectmen's order on file to the 
amount of thirty-three thousand six hundred and seventeen 
dollars and fifty cents, ($33,617.50) with evidence of their 
payment by him. Also, cancelled notes and receipts for 
State and County taxes and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the Treasury of nine hundred and 
nintytwo dollars and eighty-six cents, ($992.86). 

VERNET H. KELLER, 
Hatfield, March 5, 1913. Auditor. 



$3167 02 




120 00 




79 00 




16 67 




370 00 




992 86 






$4745 55 






$2145 55 



Report of the Sinking Fund 
Commissioners 



We have the following amounts deposited to the credit of 
the Sinking Fund: 

Haydenville Savings Bank, 
Northampton Institution for Savings, 
Nonotuck Savings Bank, 
Florence Savings Bank, 
Easthampton Savings Bank, 
Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, 
Springfield Institution for Sa /ings, 
Union Trust Co , Springfield, 
Boston & Maine R. R., bonds, 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., bonds, 
Springfield Street Railway, bonds, 
Town of Hatfield Water bonds, 

$19,024 18 
M. J. RYAN, 

E. S. WARNER, 

L. J. PELLISSIER, 

Sinking Fund Commissioners. 

I have this day examined the account of Sinking Fund 
Commissioners and find accounts correct. 

V. H. KELLER, Auditor. 
March 1st, 1913. 



$ 1,467 


46 


1,057 


60 


1,142 


90 


1,148 


76 


1,078 


64 


993 


82 


970 


87 


2.164 


13 


3,000 


00 


2,000 00 


1,000 00 


3,000 


00 



Water Commissioners Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the seventeenth 
annual report of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

We have received the past year as follows: — 

Balance of cash from last year's account, $ 137 16 
Cash from collection of water rates, 4474 36 

$4611 52 

We have paid the past year as follows: — 

Town of Hatfield, from water rates, $ 2861 67 

advances for construc- 
tion, 1912, 1000 00 
New construction, Bradstreet, 318 71 
Norwood Engineering Co., supplies, 43 85 
W. H. Riley & Co., " 57 56 
John P. Ryan, labor, 7 50 
Edson W Strong, fence posts, cash paid 

and labor, 185 45 

Edson W. Strong, collection of water rates, 134 23 
Balance, cash on hand, 2 55 

$4611 52 

The total cost of the water works to March 1, 1913, is 
$61,403.14. 

36 



37 

There are now 395 connections with private property, 97 
fire hydrants, 5 water tanks, and water in 5 school houses and 
in Memorial Hall. 

There are now 18,781 feet of 8 in. pipe 



49,680 


, 6 « 


35,206 


' 4 " 


1,757 


' 2 " 


10,658 


1 1 " 


1,070 


' % " 



Total 117,152 feet or over 22 miles. 

DANIEL W. WELLS, 
M. J. PROULX, 
ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Hatfield Water Commissioners. 
Hatfield, Mass., March 1, 1913. 



I have this day examined the accounts of the Treasurer 
of the Water Commissioners of Hatfield and find them correct 
with vouchers on file for all payments made. 



V. H. KELLER, Auditor. 



March 1st, 1913. 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics for the Town of Hatfield for the year 
1912, are as follows: — 

BIRTH BY MONTHS 







No. Males 


Females 


January, 

February, 

March, 




3 3 

7 5 
7 3 



2 
4 


April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 




5 4 

5 2 

11 6 

7 4 
9 7 

3 1 

4 1 


1 
3 
5 
3 
2 
2 
3 


November, 
December, 




7 5 
6 4 


2 
2 






74 45 


29 




BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 








Father 


Mother 


Born in Canada, 

United States, 


1 
20 



22 



38 



39 





Father 


Mother 


Born in Poland, 


45 


44 


Germany, 
Hungary, 
Ireland, 



6 

2 


1 
6 
1 



74 



74 



BIRTHS FOR THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS. 



1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


67 


92 


64 


79 


69 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 

October, 

November, 

December, 



No. 

1 

2 



3 

1 

1 

3 

1 

4 

6 
10 





32 



Eirst marriage of both parties, 



31 



Second marriage of bride, first of groom, 1 

The oldest and youngest grooms, were forty-seven and twenty - 
one years of age respectively. 



40 

The oldest and youngest brides, were forty and seventeen 
years of age respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED 





Groom 


Bride 


Born in United States, 


12 


12 


Poland, 


20 


19 


Germany, 





1 



32 



32 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


33 


21 


33 


26 


22 



DEATHS BY MONTHS 





No. 


Males 


Females 


January, 


1 


1 





February, 


3 


1 


2 


March, 


2 


2 





April, 


7 


5 


2 


May, 


2 


1 


1 


June, 


1 


L 





July, 


2 


1 


1 


August, 


5 


4 


1 


September, 


8 


4 


4 


October, 


1 


1 





November, 


2 


1 


1 


December, 


3 


3 






37 



25 



12 



41 



Under 1 year of age, 
Between 1 and 5 years, 
5 10 



10 


20 


20 


30 


30 


40 


40 


50 


50 


60 


60 


70 


70 


80 


80 


90 



No. 
9 
4 
3 
1 
5 
1 


3 
8 
3 



ale 


Female 


6 


3 


2 


2 


3 





1 





4 


1 





1 














2 


1 


5 


3 


2 


1 



37 



25 



12 



Age of oldest person deceased (female) 85 years, 3 months 
and 17 days. 

CAUSES OF DEATH. 

Classified according to the nomenclature adopted by the 
State Board of Registration. 

ZOMOTIC DISEASES. 



Malarial Fever, 
Cholera Infantum, 
Influenza, 



CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. 



Tuberculosis, 

Hydrocephalus, 

Premature Births, 

Stillbirth, 

Deformities, 

Cerebral Hemorrhages, 



42 

LOCAI, DISEASES. 



Ovarion Cysts, 

Apoplexy, 

Pneumonia, 

Heart Disease, 

Obstruction of bowels, 

Diabetes, 

Anterior Poliomyetitis, 



VIOLENT DEATHS. 



Fall— accidental, 
Drowning — accidental, 



NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED. 



Alvin L. Strong 
Richard G. Ryan 
Antoine Rumage 
Adelia Koztowska 
Vatslof Sidoski 
Mary Hanioski 
Nancy Dunn 
Charles May berry 
Joseph S. Wells 
Beatrice H. Schmitters 
Joseph Billings 
Phila E- Porter 
Sarah A. Langdon 
Stanley Mahoski 
Mary Ryan 
Oscar Belden 



Zusie Undros 
Clarence R. Benson 
Stanley Filepek 
Mary McGrath 
Conrad W. Wolfram 
Oliver S. Graves 
Joseph J. Deinelin 
Isaac B. Lowell 
Frank Wyrocski 
Margaret D. Driscoll 
Frank Zuroff 
Thaddeus Graves 
Nora M. Reagan 
George B. Barnes 
John P. Rogaleski 
Joseph Pikinka 
Edward Burke 



43 

DOG^LICENSES. 

The number of dogs licensed during the year ending Nov. 
30, 1912, with the receips and settlements of the account with 
the County Treasurer, is as follows: — 

70 male dogs at $2 each, $140 

3 female dogs at $5 each, 15 

$155 00 

Less fees, 73 dogs at 20 cents each, 14 60 



Paid to County Treasurer, $140 40 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Town Clerk. 



Assessor's Report 



Value of assessed personal estate, $408,002 

Value of assessed real estate, 1,228,228 

Total value of assessed estate, $1,636,330 

Value of assessed buildings, $680,219 
Value of assessed land, 548,009 



No. polls assessed, 

Residents assessed on property, 
Non-residents assessed on property, 
For poll tax only, 
Rate of tax per $1000, $15 10 

No. of horses assessed, 

Cows, 

Neat cattle, 

Swine, 

Fowls, 

Dwelling houses, 

Acres of land, 
State tax, $2445 00 

County tax, 1916 69 

Town tax, 21250 00 

Overlayings, 217 38 



$1,228,228 

561 

378 

79 

292 



485 

274 

53 

10 

100 

348 

9258 



Estimated Bank and Corporation tax, 
Excise tax, 

44 



-$25829 07 

1200 00 

703 78 



45 

Omitted assessment, $ 1017 96 

Value of property exempt from taxation, 
Chapter 490, Act of 1909. 

Literary institutions, $74128 

Church property, 29000 

$103128 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDSON W. STRONG, 
P. W. MULLINS, 
L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



Report of the Trustees 
of Hatfield Public Library 



It is generally conceded that the day has gone by when 
the library can be a storehouse of the classics, and of stand- 
ard literature and nothing more. To these must be added 
literature that refreshes and amuses the reader. 

One of the most important departments of a library in 
any town or city is that devoted to juvenile literature, for "the 
children of to-day are the citizens of to-morrow, " and the more 
opportunity for general development they have now, the bet- 
ter citizens they will become. 

It has been the aim of the trustees of this library to meet as 
far as possible the needs of the younger generation by adding 
books which will be especially interesting and helpful to the 
boys and girls of this town, and other volumes will be added 
month by month as the demand for such reading increases. 

It would be a hopeful sign if there was a greater demand 
for books other than fiction. There are many valuable books 
in the library which are hardly ever taken from the shelves, 
books of history biography, and such as deal with social and 
economic questions are of great educational value and should 
have a large place in our reading. Other books of equal 
educational value can be added to the library as fast as there 
is a call for them. 

A library cannot be conducted to-day as it was twenty- 
ave years ago, there is coming to be a new appreciation of 

46 



47 

the needs of every individual in his or her relation to society, 
and under these conditions no library trustees are at liberty to 
ignore their responsibility for the general good of the com- 
munity. This sense of responsibility has called for some 
changes along lines of larger efficiency. To meet the needs 
of the town as a whole books are placed in the hands of com- 
petent persons in the different sections and are freely dis- 
tributed to all who desire to read them. At least one-third of 
all the books in circulation from the Hatfield library, are 
read by the people living in the outlying districts. 

The expense of running the library naturally increases 
with the number of new books purchased, repairs necessary 
to be made and the increasing number of readers. 

The library can be much improved in every respect, when 
the time comes that the town can see its way clear to in- 
crease the appropriation, but as it now stands no great change 
can be expected. One change must necessarily be made at 
once, an assistant librarian's services must be secured in 
order that those who visit the library for the purpose of 
getting books may have their wants supplied more expe- 
ditiously 

IRVING A. FLINT, 

For Trustees. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



School Committee 



AND 



Superintendent of Schools 



OF THE 



Town of Hatiield 



FOB THE 



Year Ending March 1, 1913 



Herald Job Print 

Northampton 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



srn 


1 expires 1913 


< ( 


1913 


< ( 


1915 



Arthur R. Breor, Chairman, 
John F. O'Dea, Secretary, 
Thaddeus Graves, 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Clinton J. Richards, 

22 Prospect Avenue, Northampton 

Telephone 858-W 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield Schools) 
C. A. Byrne, M D., (Hill, Bradstreet and West Hatfield) 

TRUANT OFFICER 

S. W. Kingsley 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Spring Term begins March 31, 1913; ends June 6, 1913 
Fall Term begins September 2, 1913; ends December 19, 1913 
Winter Term begins January 5, 1914; ends March 13, 1914 
Spring Term bogins March 30, 1914; ends June 5, 1914 



Report of School Committee 



Following the resignation of Rev. W. E. Foley the Com- 
mittee organized with A. R. Breor as Chairman and John F. 
O'Dea, Secretary. The time for the regular meetings was 
fixed for the last Friday of each month. 

The Joint Committees from the towns of Bernardston, 
Hadley, and Hatfield met in April and elected Clinton J. 
Richards as Superintendent at a salary of $1600. Hatfield 
pays 11-29 of this and is entitled to the same proportion of 
his services. 

Several improvements have been made in our school 
buildings. All the school room walls have been painted and 
floors oiled. New seats have been put in where needed. 
Fire escapes have been put up on all buildings. There were 
two other improvements we wished to make but could not for 
lack of money. One was for toilet rooms in the Bradstreet 
building, and the other was to enlarge the cellar of the West 
Brook school. Some outside painting of school buildings 
should be done before long. 

The law requiring all pupils to be vaccinated has been 
enforced in all our schools. There has been but little sick- 
ness among puptls during the past year. Several cases of 
scarlet fever have occurred, but by prompt measures of 
quarantine, fumigation, and burning of books liable to be 
infected, the disease has been kept from spreading. 

The form and date of reports to the State have been 

52 



53 



changed. Both fiscal returns and membership data have to 
be made for the year beginning July 1, and ending June 30. 
This has made it necessary to keep a new form of accounts. 
These are made out by the Committee and Superintendent, 
using blanks suggested by the State. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
For the Year Ending March 1, 1913 

RESOURCES 



From Town, General Appropriation, 


$6,100 00 


Supervisors, 


300 00 


Dog Fund, 


115 70 


Fire Escapes, 


500 00 


From Tuition, City Wards, 


58 50 


Northampton, 


282 62 


Whately, 


102 66 


From State, School Fund, 


792 04 


Supt. of Schools, 


491 09 


From Tickets and Supplies Sold, 


32 32 




$8,774 93 


EXPENDITURES 




Salaries of Teachers and Supervisors, 


$4,653 70 


Janitors, 


782 31 


Supt. of Schools, 


599 61 


Books and Supplies, 


617 93 


Fuel, 


799 98 


Transportation, 


132 40 



54 

Repairs (Including Fire Escapes) $1,167 73 

Miscellaneous Expenses, 106 63 

Total Expenditures, $8,860 29 

Overdrawn, $85 36 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chairman. 



55 



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Superintendent's Report 



In this, my second annual report, I shall refer briefly to 
some of the school conditions and activities of the past year 
and call attention to future needs and opportunities. It 
should be remembered that whatever suggestions for improve- 
ment in any department may be made, the real objective is 
the welfare of our children. 

TEACHERS. 

By far the largest factor in the success or failure of any 
school system is its teaching force. To secure and hold good 
teachers must always be the school official's greatest problem. 
Supervision, buildings, books, and other equipment, however 
complete and efficient, are of no avail unless the teacher in 
charge has the necessary qualifications. If we were willing 
to establish a salary schedule ranging from ten dollars as a 
minimum to fifteen dollars as a maximum weekly salary, it- 
would do more to give our schools a high standing than any 
other action that could be taken. Such a schedule, properly 
established and carried out, would tend to eliminate any 
teachers who could not measure up to the required standard 
of excellence, and would enable us to secure and hold for 
longer terms of service those who are efficient. 

TEACHERS' MEETINGS. 

Two teachers' meetings have been held, one in Hatfield 

56 



57 

at the beginning, and the'other at Hadley near the middle of 
this school year. At these meetings such matters were con- 
sidered as apply to local conditions and needs. 

The last meeting held was notable for the special atten- 
tion given to some of the more modern phases of education. 
Mr. W E. Riley of the Lowell Normal School, and Prof. O. 
A. Morton of the Massachusetts Agricultural College assisted 
at this meeting. 

TKXT BOOKS. 

During the past year the course in History has been 
strengthened by the introduction of Mace's Primary History 
in the sixth grade and Bourne and Burton's Introductory 
American History in the seventh grade. 

The fourth and fifth grades have been provided with 
Frye's Geography, Book One- The higher grades should also 
be given new books this year in place of those now in use. 

The South worth-Stone three-book series of arithmetics 
have been introduced throughout all the schools. Their use 
has added much to the interest and value of the study. 

Each teacher keeps a record of all books and supplies on 
hand and received, together with a record of the kind, num- 
ber, and condition of those given to pupils. 

I would suggest that in the higher grades, when a pupil has 
finished satisfactorily the work comprised in any textbook in 
arithmetic, history, geography, or physiology, he should be 
given the book for his own use. Such books would be of 
much value in the family for the purpose of reference or re- 
view- It would also give the pupil a sense of ownership and 
added interest in the books used, if he knew that they were 
to become his property when completed. 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

To provide suitable accommodations for our increasing 



58 

school population is just now one of the most pressing of our 
school problems. It is apparent that the present buildings 
are inadequate both in size and construction. ~ In the West 
Hatfield, North Hatfied, and Bradstreet buildings there is at 
present sufficient seating room, but certain alterations and 
improvements should be made in order that they may be 
more sanitary and convenient. As it will always be neces- 
sary to maintain schools in these sections of the town, any 
repairs or changes should be for permanent rather than tem- 
porary advantage. 

The birth records and school enrollment show that from 
two-thirds to three-fourths of all our children live in that part 
of the town tributary to either the Hill or Center Schools. If 
present conditions continue we are likely within five years to 
need from ten to twelve school rooms to properly accommo- 
date the children of this section. We can reckon on having 
only five rooms in the present buildings, as it cannot be ex- 
pected that the present arrangement with the Academy is to 
be permanent- It would seem that a new building, either to 
supplement or to take the place of those now in use, will be 
a necessity within a short period. If the use of another 
room can be secured temporarily, it may be best to defer 
definite action in regard to a new building until another year 
when we should be able to size up the situation more ac- 
curately, and decide more wisely as to what should be done. 

MUSIC, DRAWING AND PENMANSHIP. 

The work in Music under the faithful and intelligent 
supervision of Miss Boyle has progressed very satisfactorily. 

At the beginning of this school year Miss Hibbard, the 
Supervisor of Drawing, resigned to accept a more desirable 
position elsewhere. The work since then in drawing has 
been carried on by the teachers independently. I would 
recommend that an effort be made to secure a competent su- 
pervisor of this subject for the next school year. 



59 1 

The Palmer Penmanship, introduced last year, is being 
taught with various degress of success according to the skill 
of teachers and their interest in the subject- It is a great 
improvement over the cramped vertical system. But to get 
the best results a Supervisor should be employed to have 
special charge of this subject and guide and instruct the 
teachers and pupils as far as necessary. The subject is one 
of the three most important taught in our schools. It cer- 
tainly deserves equal if not more attention than those subjects 
for which special teachers are usually employed. 

PRACTICAL ARTS. 

Instruction in practical arts in some form should be. given 
in all out schools. When carried on intelligently such 
instruction does not take away anything of value from the 
other subjects, but rather helps them by giving interest and 
vitality to all other school work. 

CARK OF PUPILS AT NOON. 

Any one familiar with school conditions will readily 
understand that any considerable number of pupils should not 
be left to themselves during the noon recess period without 
some responsible person in charge, 

I would recommend that arrangements be made before 
the opening of the next school year so that a teacher or other 
reliable person may be in charge of each building during the 
entire time that the pupils are present. This might be pro- 
vided for in the teachers' contracts and, if necessary, they be 
paid for the extra work required. 

STATISTICS. 

It will be observed by the table accompanying this report 
that the membership of all public town schools on October, 



60 

19 L2, was 340- The corresponding membership in 1911 was 
315, and in 1910 was 277, — a gain of 63 in two years. 

The average membership for the school year 1911-1912 
was 298; the average attendance, 255; and the per cent of 
attendance, .85. The low per cent of attendance was caused 
in large measure by several epidemics of contagious diseases 
during the earlier part of the school 3^ear. 

The average birth rate for the last eight years, beginning 
with 1905, has been 72. The effect of this larger birth rate 
are beginning to be seen in the increased number in the lower 
grades. The table referred to shows that the first grade has 
74 pupils and the second grade 62, an average of 68. The 
average age of pupils is not less than six years If they re- 
main in school for eight years, the present legal requirement, 
it is easy to demonstrate that within a period of five years or 
less we are liable to have in our schools an enrollment of 
about 500 pupils. 



CONCLUSION. 

We are facing a serious problem and responsibility in 
Hatfield, and the future welfare of our community depends 
on how we attempt to solve the problem and meet the respon- 
sibility. 

About two-thirds of our pupils are of foreign parentage. 
In a few years they are to be a majority of the voters 
in town affairs. They are ambitious, strong, thrifty, and 
willing to learn. The public schools should be the leading 
agency in so training these boys and girls that they may 
become useful and respected citizens who shall feel pride in 
their town, and cherish all that is best in its traditions of 
community service and betterment. To this end our school 
buildings and grounds should be ample and well equipped; 
the course of study should bring to the child an appreciation 



61 

of the best things in our home and community life; and the 
teachers should able to teach and exemplify the highest type 
of American Citizenship. 

Shall we work together for this end? 

CLINTON J. RICHARDS. 



Report of Medical Inspector 



The school year 1912-1913 was characterized by two 
epidemics — measles and mumps, in the closing of the spring 
term. During the summer these diseases died out. 

At the opening of the fall term the schools were free from 
contagious diseases. 

A few cases of scarlet fever and diphtheria occurred in 
persons of pupils but proper precautions being taken, no 
epidemic resulted. 

Great improvements have been made in the sanitary 
condition of the Hill and Center schools. 

Some of the outside schools, however, are far from 
being satisfactory. 

It would be advisable, if the Town saw fit, to have these 
conditions remedied during the summer vacation- 

We would call special attention to these needs of the 
Bradstreet school. 

A. J. BONNEVILLE, 
CHAS. A. BYRNE. 



62 



Report of Supervisor of Music 



The study of vocal music in the graded schools has been 
continued along the same lines as formerly. . 

We are endeavoring to give to the children of the Hat- 
field schools the best possible advantages of the musical 
course by teaching them grade by grade the fundamentals 
and principles of music and by requiring good tone, quality, 
and intelligent interpretation in class singing. This is due to 
a great extent to the thorough individual drill which each 
pupil receives. 

It is my desire to express my sincere gratitude to the 
teachers for their hearty cooperation and perseverence in this 
line of work. 

MAUD E- BOYLE. 



63 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE- 



TOWN OFFICERS 



THE- 




•■-// 

r 



Town of Hatfield 



•FOR THE- 



Year Ending March 1, 1914 



HEARLD JOB PRINT 
NORTHAMPTON 



Finance Committee 



To the voters of the Town of Hatfield : 

Gentlemen: — The following necessary appropria- 
tions and improvements can be approximately had 
with a tax rate of $19, which this Committee advises, 
rather than lowering the rate to $18, by raising the 
valuation of property on the outskirts of the town. 

WE RECOMMEND: 

Money already voted on and to be assessed in 1914: — 
Bradstreet Eoad, (Note) $2,500 00 

Bradstreet Box Culvert, (Note) 2,100 00 

Street Lights, to July 1st, 1914, 1,100 00 

First payment and interest, New School loan, 2,900 00 



$8,600 00 
Article 5 — Highways. 

Ordinary repairs highways and 
bridges and for tools on re- 
pairs stone roads, $3,000 00 

$3,000 00 



Article 6. Necessary town expenses. 

Contingencies, $1,000 00 

Care Memorial Hall, 150 00 

Bonds— Town Officers, 60 00 

Town Water Eates, 500 00 

Salaries— Town Officers, 1,500 00 

Care of Poor, 1,000 00 

Insurance, 110 00 

Interest on outstanding and 

temporary notes, 800 00 
Schools — maintenance and re- 
pairs, 9,350 00 



$14,470 00 

Inspection of animals, beeves & carcasses, 300 00 

Article 8. Memorial Day, 75 00 

Article 11. Care of Cemeteries, 100 00 

Article 12. Public Library, 350 00 

Article 13. Tuition — Smith Academy, 500 00 

Article 14. Muster Day, 75 00 

Article 16. School Physicians, 100 00 

Article 17. Tuition— Smith Agri. School, 300 00 

Article 20. Oiling Eoads, 350 00 

Article 23. The sum of $6,000 for permanent 
roads at Bradstreet and on Chestnut 
street, — $5,000.00 of this amount to be 
spent finishing the Bradstreet stone road, 



and $1,000.00 for Chestnut street.— 
$2,000.00 of this sum to be assessed on the 
polls and estates of the town for the year 
1915, $2,000.00 for the year 1916, and 
$2,000.00 for the year 1917. Also, in con- 
nection with this Article it is recommend- 
ed that the Selectmen be instructed to in- 
terview the Mass. Highway Commission 
for an appropriation of $3,000.00 for ex- 
tending the macadam work North on 
Main street. 

Article 24. Chestnut street tile drain, . 400 00 

Article 25. We recommend that the sum of 
$300.00 be raised and appropriated for 
building a sidewalk on North side of 
King street, — provided that the abutters 
will bind themselves in writing to pay a 
like sum to the town, 300 00 

Article 27. Fire Dept. supplies & hose tower, 500 00 

Article 30. We recommend that the Select- 
men be instructed to confer with the Am- 
herst Gas Co. and make the best terms 
possible, also, to authorize them so that 
they can make or not make contract with 
said company, 1,560 00 

Article 31. Spraying of trees and Tree 

Warden work, 500 00 

$31,480 00 



Respectfully submitted, 

John J. Betsold, 
M. W. Boyle, 
J. E. Porter, 
A. R. Breor, 
J. F. Day, 
Thaddeus Graves, 
Thos. A. Nolan, 
John McHugh, 
Daniel P. Sheehan, 
Charles W. Wade, 
0. E. Belden, 
H. W. Wolfram, 
A. H. Graves, 
L. H. Kingsley, 
Finance Committee. 



Articles in the Town Warrant for 
Town Meeting March 16, 1914 



Article 1. To choose a Moderator to preside at 
said meeting. 

Article 2. To choose all necessary town officers 
for the ensuing year. — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; 
one Assessor for 3 years; Town Treasurer; one School 
Committee for 3 years; one Water Commissioner for 
3 years; one Sinking Fund Commissioner for 3 years; 
one Trustee for Public Library for 3 years; Auditor; 
Tree Warden; Elector, under the Will of Oliver Smith; 
Tax Collector; six Constables; and to vote on the ques- 
tions — ' ' Yes " or l ' No ' J — Shall Licenses be granted for 
the sale of intoxicating liquors in this town! Shall 
this town accept the provisions of Section 42 of Chapter 
514 of the Acts of the year 1909, as affected by Chapter 
494 of the Acts of the year 1911, which provides that 
eight hours shall constitute a day's work for city or 
town employees'? Shall Chapter 807 of the Acts of 
1913, being an act to provide for compensating labor- 
ers, workmen and mechanics for injuries sustained in 

7 



8 

public employment, and to exempt from legal liability 
counties and municipal corporations which pay such 
compensations, be accepted by the inhabitants of this 
Town? All the foregoing to be voted for on one bal- 
lot. 

The polls will be opened at ten o 'clock in the fore- 
noon, and be kept open at least four hours, and for as 
much longer time as a majority of the voters present 
shall direct, but in no case shall they be kept open after 
the hour of sunset. 

Article 3. To hear the reports of the various town 
officers and act thereon. 

Article 4. To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5. To take action in relation to mainten- 
ance and repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing 
year, and raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 6. To take action in relation to raising 
money and appropriating same to defray the necessary 
expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7. To see what action the town will take 
in relation to the prompt payment of taxes the ensuing 
year. 

Article 8. To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Memorial Day. 

Article 9. To take action in relation to support of 
the poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appro- 
priate money for the same. 



Article 10. To revise and accept the list of Jurors 
reported by the Selectmen. 

Article 11. To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the care of cemeteries for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Article 12. To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the Public Library for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 13. To see if the town will raise and ap- 
priate money for the payment of tuitions of Hatfield 
children in Smith Academy, who are of suitable age 
and attainments to attend High School. 

Article 14. To see if the town will raise and ap- 
priate money for Firemen's Muster. 

Article 15. To see if the town will vote to author- 
ize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year. 

Article 16. To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the employment of one or more 
School Physicians, in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906. 

Article 17. To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions of Hat- 
field children attending the Smith Industrial School at 
Northampton. 



10 

Article 18. To see if the town will vote to appoint 
a Finance Committee to act for the ensuing year. 

Article 19. To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for purchasing supplies needed by the 
Fire Department. 

Article 20. To see if the town will vote to oil the 
stone roads of the town the ensuing year, and raise and 
appropriate money for the same. 

Article 21. To see if the town will vote to change 
the time of holding its Annual Spring Town Meeting 
from third Monday in March, to an earlier date. 

Article 22. To see if the town will petition the 
Director of the Bureau of Stataistics for an audit of its 
accounts, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 
598, Acts of 1910, and amendments thereof. 

Article 23. To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $6,000 for building perma- 
nent roads on Bradstreet Depot road and on Chestnut 
street, $5,000 for finishing Bradstreet road and $1,000 
on Chestnut street; said sum to be raised as recom- 
mended by your Finance Committee. 

Article 24. To see if the town will vote to build 
a 10-inch tile drain from opposite the Landry house 
on Chestnut street, South through M. P. Kiley's lot, 
across School street and Wm. P. Boyle 's lot to Mill Eiv- 
er; for the purpose of taking away the surface water 



11 

that collects at that part of Chestnut street, and raise 
and appropriate money for same. 

Article 25. To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $300 for building a side- 
walk on North side of King street under provisions as 
recommended by your Finance Committee. 

Article 26. To see if the town will vote to extend 
its sewer system on South street, from opposite A. W. 
Morton 's residence South to tenement of Gr. A. Billings, 
money to be taken from contingent account. 

Article 27. To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $500 for supplies and build- 
ing a hose tower for the Fire Department. 

Article 28. To see if the town will vote to pay for 
books used by pupils of the town attending Smith 
Academy, the money to be taken from the contingent 
account. 

Article 29. To see if the town will vote to build 
a permanent road of stone or other material, on North 
Main street, under the provisions of Chapter 525, Acts 
of 1910. 

Article 30. To see if the town will vote to con- 
tract with the Amherst Gras Company to furnish Elec- 
tric Street Lights for three or five years, and raise and 
appropriate the sum of $1,560 for same, from July 1st 
to Dec. 31st, 1914. 



12 

Article 31. To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate $500 for the spraying of trees and Tree 
Warden work. 

Article 32. To see if the town will vote to author- 
ize the Selectmen to straighten and establish the 
hounds of the "Great Ponset" Eoad from a point 
where the said road leaves Middle Division, West to a 
point near Mill Eiver. 

Article 33. To see if the town will instinct the 
Selectmen to demand of the Conn. Valley Ry. Co. for 
better service; for repairs on all driveways and cross- 
overs; to abate any other nuisances complained of to 
the Selectmen; also, to proceed to collect all bills due 
the town. 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield : 

Gentlemen: — In accordance with the requirements 
of the Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report 
for the year ending March 1st, 1914, is respectfully sub- 
mitted : 

STATE AID. 

Paid to three persons, $120 00 

POOR EXPENDITURES. 

Charles A. Byrne, medical attendance, $23 00 

Aid — cash paid, 135 00 

Mrs. F. J. Morgan, board, 12 00 

Thomas P. Fitzgerald, rent, 21 00 

Mary J. Proulx, rent, 10 00 

H. D. Smith, coal, 17 48 

John J. Betsold, wood, 9 00 

L. J. Pelissier, supplies, 30 07 

M. J. Ryan, supplies, 81 65 

M. J. Proulx, sawing wood, 2 00 

13 



14 



City of Holyoke, 197 85 

City of Northampton, 107 00 

State Board of Charity, 41 50 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

F. T. Bardwell, forest and at Strong's fire, 

J. M. Strong, forest and at Strong's fire, 

C. H. Crafts, forest and at Strong 's fire, 

J. J. Betsold, at Strong's fire, 

J. F. Day, at Strong's fire, 

City of Northampton, at Strong 's fire, 

Fire Chief, L. L. Pease's fire, 

P. W. Mullins, horse at fires, 

Fred Wenzel, work at fires, and on hose, 

Revere Rubber Co., hose and couplings, 

B. & M. Rd. ft., 

W. L. Chilson, harness, 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS. 



$687 55 



$92 20 


123 20 


43 00 


36 00 


17 50 


50 00 


19 00 


2 00 


9 00 


221 89 


1 06 


29 00 



$643 85 



Charles A. Byrne, $50 00 

A. J. Bonneville, 50 00 

$100 00 



15 
TOWN OFFICEES. 

John E. Porter, services as Selectman, 1912, $150 00 

J. J. Betsold, services as Selectman, 1912, 75 00 

M. W. Boyle, services as Selectman, 1912, 75 00 

D. W. Wells, services as Water Commissioner, 10 00 
M. J. Proulx, services as Water Commissioner, 10 00 

A. E. Breor, services at Water Commissioner, 10 00 

C. I. Stowell, services as Ballot Clerk, 7 00 
Eobert J. McGrath, services as Ballot Clerk, 7 00 

D. E. Holley, services as Ballot Clerk, 7 00 
Scott Harris, services as Ballot Clerk, 7 00 

E. W. Strong, services as Assessor, 61 25 
P. W. Mullins, services as Assessor, 88 00 
L. H. Kingsley, ser. as Assessor, copyg val. bk., 180 00 
V. H. Keller, services as Auditor, 10 00 
E. L. Graves, services as Tax Collector, 1912, 200 00 
Thomas W. Eyan, services as Eeg. of Voters, 10 00 
L. H. Kingsley, services as Eeg. of Voters, 10 00 
S. F. Billings, services as Eeg. of Voters, 10 00 
E. W. Weber, services as Eeg. of Voters, 10 00 
L. H. Kingsley, services as Town Clerk, Clerk 

of Board of Selectmen, 400 00 

as Town Treasurer, 100 00 

A. E. Breor, services as Constable, 6 00 

George Eberlein, services as Constable, 2 00 



$1,445 25 



16 
PROTECTION OF TREES. 

Brackett, Shaw & Lunt, machine and hose, $351 00 

B. & M. Rd. ft., 9 54 

Merrimac Chem. Co., lead, 47 92 

Jas. P. Kelly, labor, 11 00 

H. D. Smith, team and man, 25 00 

S. W. Kingsley, labor and man climbing, 51 80 

W. H. Riley, rep. pump, 2 64 

M. J. Ryan, sup., 3 85 



TOOL HOUSE ADDITION. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



$502 75 



Fred W. Schepp, slating, $42 00 

F. L. Betsold, labor, 65 00 



$107 00 



Johnson's Bookstore, books, $49 51 

Bridgeman & Lyman, books, 15 64 

T. S. Rorke, books, 75 

The H. R. Huntting Co., books, 51 64 

Underwood & Underwood, pictures, 16 90 

0. E. Woodward, magazines, 13 80 

J. W. Heffernan, supplies, 7 30 

Metcalf & Company, supplies, 2 50 

C. A. Hodges, Asst. Librarian, 3 75 

Margaret A. Ryan, Asst. Librarian, 32 25 



17 

C. M. Barton, Librarian, 75 00 

C. M. Barton, labor and cash paid, 80 96 



$350 00 



CONTINGENCIES. 

Herald Job Print, printing reports, $126 30 

Chas. A. Byrne, retng births and fumigating, 25 75 

A. J. Bonneville, retng births and fumigating, 

E. L. Graves, env., stamps, postage on reports, 

H. S. Gere, advertising, 

Metcalf & Co., ballots, 

C. H. Chase, transfers real est., 

E. E. Davis, ex. bridges and surveying, 
J. M. Strong, posting, 
Am. Gas Co., light Town Hall, 
Dike Co. at Boston, 
J. W. Heffernan, journal, 
George Eberlein, labor, 
Johnson's Bookstore, tax book, 
Foster Bros,, supplies, 

F. G. Vollinger, sawing wood, 
L. H, Kingsley, recording, indexing births, 

marriages and deaths, 

Serving S. Warrants, 

Fares, ex. and postage pd., 
C. L. Stowell, care Wilkie plot, 
E. S. Warner, inspection carcasses, beeves, 
C. T. Bagnall, tax bills, 
Hobbs & Warren, books, 



21 50 


21 63 


1 00 


12 00 


10 05 


44 52 


2 00 


8 95 


30 00 


3 10 


2 15 


2 05 


4 50 


4 00 


51 80 


18 00 


10 85 


3 00 


206 25 


2 76 


12 59 



18 

Scott Harris, care Clock and Town Hall, 
C. Coolidge, ex. to Boston, 
E. J. McCarthy, rep. stove Town Hall, 
S. W. Kingsley, police duty, 



TEEE WAEDEN. 



27 50 


20 00 


25 98 


8 00 



$706 23 



P. J. Whalen, services Tree Warden, $47 65 

Mike Stackpole, trimming trees, 

Joseph Eaboin, trimming trees, 

Wm. C. Kingsley, trimming trees, 

Martin Zabka, trimming trees, 

Stefan Kempiste, trimming trees, 

Dennis Whalen, trimming trees, 

Fred Winzel, trimming trees, 

Greenfield Electric Co., trimming trees, 

J. A. Sullivan, supplies, 

Foster Bros., supplies, 

F. J. Safder, filing saws, 

S. E. Briggs, filing saws, 

$211 78 
STEEET LIGHTING. 
Amherst Gas Company, $2,446 93 

ELM STEEET STONE EOAD, 

D. P. Sheehan, Supt, team and labor, $184 75 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 76 25 

Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 92 25 



14 40 


44 10 


18 00 


1 00 


2 00 


3 50 


31 51 


16 40 


26 99 


4 98 


1 00 


25 



19 

Dennis "Whalen, team and labor, 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 

John C. Ryan, team and labor, 

David Billings, team and labor, 

Alfred E. Breor, team and labor, 

H. D. Smith, team and labor, 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 

Alex Kozash, team and labor, 

Benj. M. Warner, team and labor, 

John Koisor, team and labor, 

L. J. Castetn, labor, 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 

George Bndzjn, labor, 

John Konceniec, labor, 

John Fusek, labor, 

George M. Franklin, labor, 

Victor Tafelowski, labor, 

Fred Barcyn, labor, 

Tlios. Heafey, labor, 

Frank Pasbek, labor, 

Jacob Geis, labor, 

George Gishch, labor, 

H. L. Pellam, labor, 

Joe Kobat, labor, 

Jnrko Wolosyn, sand and labor, 

W. H. Riley & Co., tile, 

City of Northampton, stone, 

J, S. L^ne & Son, stone, 

Frank L. Betsold, work on fence, 

S. W. Kingsley, rep. and labor, 



79 75 


27 00 


73 00 


112 50 


93 50 


25 27 


88 86 


56 25 


20 00 


22 50 


70 50 


53 75 


38 39 


29 36 


20 00 


34 52 


35 00 


31 89 


16 00 


4 67 


30 14 


17 89 


17 31 


3 50 


91 82 


10 20 


811 80 


502 13 


16 00 


31 98 



$2,818 73 



$50 00 


40 00 


15 00 


60 00 



20 
INSURANCE. 

H. L. Howard, workmen, 
H. L. Howard, boiler inspection, 
H. L. Howard, town clock, 
H. L. Howard, tool house, 



$165 00 
CEMETERY APPROPRIATION. 

F. H. Bardwell, Treas., $100 00 

SMITH ACADEMY. 

David Billings, Treas., $1,000 00 

BRADSTREET STONE ROAD. 

D. P. Sheehan, Supt, team and labor, $337 96 

H. Shnmway, team and labor, 116 25 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 121 50 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 143 25 

John C. Ryan, team and labor, 107 25 

Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 84 75 

Gr. E. Morton, team and labor, 37 50 

H. E. Belden, team and labor, 77 00 

H. W. Marsh, team and labor, 117 00 

A. H. Marsh, team and labor, 11 00 

Frank P. Jones, team and labor, 106 00 

O. Belden 's Sons, team and labor, 109 25 

Belden Bros., sand, team and labor, 171 95 

Samuel H. Field, team and labor, 12 75 



21 



Jas. Mullins, Jr., team and labor, 


80 25 


Wm. P. Connelly, team and labor, 


80 25 


C. H. Crafts, team and labor, 


72 00 


A. P. Graves, team and labor, 


71 25 


F. T. Bardwell, team and labor, 


45 00 


L. J. Casten, labor, 


118 54 


J. L. Sheehan, labor, 


100 00 


George Budzjn, labor, 


60 00 


John Fusek, labor, 


68 00 


Jacob Gels, labor, 


52 50 


H. L. Pellam, labor, 


50 75 


Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 


45 50 


Victor Tafelowski, labor, 


11 28 


John Bartkew, labor, 


45 50 


Walenty Toi, labor, 


35 00 


Paul Byskowski, labor, 


42 00 


Aler. Bnlda, labor, 


17 50 


H. M. Purrington, labor, 


28 00 


Jacob Jandinski, labor, 


31 50 


Wm. Herman, labor, 


1 75 


H. D. Smith, coal, 


45 59 


New Eng. Metal Culvert Co., culvert, 


84 14 


B. & M. Ed., ft. on stone, 


715 32 


J. S. Lane & Son, stone, 


619 74 


Mass. Broken Stone Co., stone, 


988 15 



$5,062 92 



22 

SIDEWALK— NOETH HATFIELD. 

D. P. Sheehan, Supt., team and labor, 
H. W. Wolfram, team and labor, 
Geo. M. Donelson, team and labor, 
Mrs. Stefan Vochula, team and labor, 
Paul Holic, team and labor, 
Wm. P. Connelly, team and labor, 
C. H. Crafts, team and labor, 
James L. Boyle, team and labor, 
J. L. Sheekan, labor, 
Jacob Geis, labor, 
Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 
Geo. Budzjn, labor, 
Anthony Popka, labor, 
John Kousence, labor, 
John Murphy, labor, 
G. B. McClellan, sand, 



SCHOOL STREET STONE ROAD. 



$16 50 


12 50 


9 00 


9 00 


9 00 


9 00 


9 00 


9 00 


5 00 


3 50 


3 50 


3 50 


3 50 


3 50 


88 


2 50 



$108 88 



D. P. Sheehan, Supt., team and labor, $367 75 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 198 50 

Alfred E. Breor, team and labor, 154 15 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 137 50 

John C. Ryan, team and labor, 204 00 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 152 00 

Alex. Kozash, team and labor, 138 50 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 161 25 

Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 174 00 



23 



David Billings, team and labor, 

John Koisor, team and labor, 

H. D. Smith, coal, team and labor, 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 

R. J. Whalen, team and labor, 

James L. Day, team and labor, 

Mrs. E. S. Harris, team and labor, 

Benj, M. Warner, team and labor, 

L. J. Casten, labor, 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 

Geo. Budzjn, labor, 

Jacob Geis, labor, 

Victor Tafelowski, labor, 

Thos. Heafey, labor, 

Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 

John Fusek, labor, 

H. M. Purrington, labor, 

H. L. Pellam, labor, 

John Byskoski, labor, 

Walenty Toi, labor, 

Thos. Karpenskie, labor, 

Victor Wasko, labor, 

John Kouseniec, labor, 

Panl Hvadsky, labor, 

Steve Spadlon, labor, 

E. W. Strong, slabs, 

H. E. Bardwell, sand, 

M. J. Proulx, sand, 

J. S. Lane & Son, stone, 

City of Northampton, stone, 

New Eng. Metal Culvert Co., culvert, 



116 00 
58 50 
120 84 
106 00 
85 50 
85 00 
9 00 
9 00 
118 50 
97 50 
87 00 
67 38 
70 95 
35 00 
47 64 
66 00 
41 60 
62 77 
40 25 
24 50 
8 75 
5 25 
2 35 
7 50 
7 50 
4 50 
17 00 
15 50 
2,300 61 
651 05 
32 00 



24 

N. Y., N. H. and Hartford E. E., demurrage, 8 00 



$6,096 59 
EESUEFACING DEPOT EOAD. 



D. P. Sheehan, Supt., team and labor, 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 

James Mullins, Jr., team and labor, 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 

H. D. Smith, coal, team and labor, 

L. J. Casten, labor, 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 

Geo. Budzjn, labor, 

Jacob Geis, labor, 

Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 

John Fusek, labor, 

City of Northampton, stone, 



$671 24 
HIGHWAYS AND BEIDGES, 
Ordinary Eepairs. 

D. P. Sheehan, Supt., team and labor, $561 43 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 265 35 

John C. Eyan, team and labor, , 98 25 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 141 70 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 173 50 

James L. Day, team and labor, 22 50 



$107 50 


48 50 


45 00 


47 00 


18 00 


27 00 


49 32 


45 00 


35 00 


18 00 


7 00 


19 25 


3 10 


201 57 



25 

Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 112 50 

Alex. Kozash, team and labor, 26 00 

John L. Proulx, team and labor, 9 00 

P. J. Whalen, team and labor, 7 00 

C. H. Crafts, team and labor, 18 00 
Wm. P. Connelly, team and labor, 18 00 
Paul Holic, team and labor, 18 00 
Mrs. Stefan Vochula, team and labor, 18 00 
Geo. M. Donelson, team and labor, 18 00 
John J. Stenglein, team and labor, 9 00 
James Mnllins, Sr., team and labor, 7 70 
Fred Carl, team and labor, 3 00 

D. W. Wells, team and labor, 4 75 
H. W. Wolfram, team and labor, 19 75 
M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 27 00 
James Mullins, Jr., team and labor, 18 25 
Alfred E. Breor, team and labor, 22 50 
H. D. Smith, team and labor, 18 78 
P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 9 00 
F. T. Bardwell, team and labor, 3 13 
John F. Day, team and labor, 2 25 
Frank P. Jones, team and labor, 2 25 
Thos. J. Eyan, team and labor, 24 00 
John L. Sheehan, labor, 157 47 
Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 108 12 
George Budzjn, labor, 110 25 
L. J. Casten, labor, 73 50 
Jacob Geis, labor, , 97 50 
Anthony Popka, labor, 15 75 
Peter Zablocki, labor, 7 00 
H. L. Pellam, labor, 5 25 



26 

Kietan Becker, labor, 10 00 

John Fusek, labor, 24 10 

John Dubil, labor, 3 00 

Fred Barcyn, labor, 1 75 

John J. Breor, labor, 9 40 

John Kouseniec, labor, 19 25 

Victor Tafelowski, labor, 3 50 

H. M. Purrington, labor, 10 50 

Frank Krulicki, labor, 7 00 

Kostanti Mallinoski, labor, 7 00 

Thomas Heaf ey, labor, 4 00 

Jacob Jandinski, labor, 1 75 

Walenty Toi, labor, 12 28 

Paul Byskoski, labor, 5 25 

John Bartkew, labor, 2 75 

John Natorwitcz, labor, 2 00 

Concord Foundry Co., faucet, 1 50 

Ceo. B. McClellan, gravel, 25 00 

E. "W. Strong, posts and gravel, 11 20 

M. J. Proulx, sand, 10 00 

L. H. Kingsley, sand, 13 50 

A. H. Graves, sand, 2 56 

James P. Kelly, care common, 9 00 

C. I. Stowell, care common, 31 75 

Norwood Eng. Co., repairs steam roller, 3 35 

E. J. McCarthy, repairs steam roller, 8 31 

Buffalo S. Roller Co., repairs steam roller, 4 39 

Geo. Eberlein, repairs steam roller, . 8 00 

J. A. Sullivan, tools and cement, 3 98 

Wm. P. Boyle, painting and signs, 7 00 

Foster Bros., supplies, 24 85 



75 


33 


63 21 


101 


25 


38 00 


1 


10 


250 00 


91 


32 


16 


50 



27 

Good Eoads Co., plow points, 10 00 

Northampton Garage, trans, inspecting bridges, 9 50 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber and plank, 

John J. Betsold, posts and plank, 

A. P. Graves, plank, 

Geo. A. Gunn, oak plank, 

C. M. Wright, lumber, 

City of Northampton, stone, 

J. S. Lane & Son, stone, 

C. Daniels, 5 prs. boots, 

$3,197 56 
OILING STONE ROADS. 
American Car Sprinkler Co., $822 50 

WATER RATES. 

Superintendent, $500 00 

BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS. 

H. L. Howard, bond Treasurer, $32 00 

H. L. Howard, bond Collector. 25 00 



$57 00 



MEMORIAL DAY. 
Charles K. Morton, $75 00 

SMITH INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 
Tuition, $100 00 



28 

MUSTER DAY. 

M. J. Ryan, Fire Chief, $110 32 

CARE MEMORIAL HALL. 

H. D. Smith, coal, $60 26 

Amherst G-as Co., electricity, 12 15 

L. H. Kingsley, janitor, 75 00 



$147 41 

SEALER WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Wm. P. Boyle, Sealer bill 1912, $26 00 

J. A. Sullivan, tools, 8 56 

E. L. Graves, Sealer's salary, 65 00 



$99 56 

BRADSTREET FILL AND BOX CULVERT. 

Republican Co., advertising, $7 20 

H. S. Gere, advertising, 5 00 

Crosby & Parker, contractors, 2,032 00 



$2,044 20 

SCHOOL EXPENDITURES. 

Margaret Woods, teaching, $154 80 

Margaret A. Ryan, teaching, 481 00 

Sarah V. Kiley, teaching, 266 10 

Constance C. Breor, teaching, 456 00 



29 

Mary Decker, teaching, 190 10 

Pearl N. Sadd, teaching, 444 00 

Elizabeth M. Kiley, teaching, 140 00 

Margaret Partenheimer, teaching, 140 00 

Nellie T. O'Brien, teaching, 444 00 

Christine Hibbard, teaching, 420 00 

Gladys V. Rand, teaching, 431 00 

Venice A. Hough, teaching, 299 00 

Marguerite A. Flaherty, teaching, 312 00 

Gladys L. Rice, teaching, 288 00 

Margaret B. Sazama, teaching, 240 00 

Lena H. Proulx, teaching, 240 00 

Helen F. Riley, teaching, 154 00 

Alice Day, teaching, 5 00 

Clinton J. Richards, services Supt., 649 59 

Clinton J. Richards, cash paid for sundries, 45 98 

Maud E. Boyle, music, 172 00 

Katherine W. Day, penmanship, 60 00 

W. E. Riley, penmanship, 4 00 

Scott Harris, janitor, 211 00 

James P. Kelly, janitor, 193 38 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, janitor, 93 15 

Katherine Flynn, janitor, 121 00 

John Salvas, janitor, 119 75 

Cornelia M. Wickles, sweeping, 36 00 

T. Graves, cash paid sweeping, 2 00 

H. D. Smith, coal, 438 97 

J. J. Betsold, wood, 43 10 

F. G. Vollinger, sawing wood, 7 00 

C. H. Crafts, sawing wood, 3 00 

John J. Steele, sawing wood, 3 75 



30 

Conn. Valley Street Ey. Co. tickets, 156 06 

L. J. Pelissier, transportation, 6 00 

Stefan Voclmla, transportation, 5 00 

Wm. P. Boyle, painting and repairs, 280 20 

Bishop Bros., repairs, 478 85 

Mike Dulaski, cementing cellar, 50 00 

L. A. Deinlein, repairs, 10 00 

Fred W. Schepp, repairs, 10 00 

F. L. Betsold, repairs, 46 39 

E. J. McCarthy, repairs, 38 06 

American Book Co., supplies, 3 20 

J. L. Hammett Co., supplies, 243 58 

Houghton Mifflin & Co., supplies, 16 05 

Silver, Burdett & Co., supplies, 7 50 

Chas. Scribner's Sons, supplies, 14 64 

C. B. Dolge Co., disinfectant, 21 00 
E. Babb & Co., books, 134 81 
Funk & Wagnalls, books, 1 80 

D. C. Heath Co., books, 4 00 
Ginn & Company, books, 92 40 
Eand, McNally & Co., books, 6 93 
Benj. Sanborn & Co., books, 32 25 
C. E. Merrill Co., books, 53 38 
Howard & Brown, diplomas, 10 50 
A. E, Breor, taking census, 18 00 
Wm. C. Kingsley, team and labor, 18 45 
J. M. Fierce, paint, 3 55 
J. A. Sullivan, supplies, 9 63 
Kingsbury Box Co., supplies, 2 70 
W. M. Welch Mfg. Co., supplies, 2 04 
Con. Dry Goods Co., supplies, 1 29 



4 68 


1 48 


4 45 


20 40 


8 15 


50 


54 77 


11 75 


69 26 


48 05 


>r, 20 00 


10 00 



31 

Little Brown & Co., supplies, 

Foster Bros., supplies, 

A. S. Barnes & Co., supplies, 

M. J. Eyan, supplies, 

Crittenden & Munson, printing, 

Wright & Potter, printing, 

Merrick Lumber Co., lumber, 

S. W. Kingsley, repairs and truants, 

A. R. Breor, services S. Com., ex. and labor, 

J. F. Day, services S. Com., ex. and labor, 

Thad. Graves, services S. Com., ex. and labor, 

O. Belden Sons, care grounds, 



$9,340 42 
RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN. 

State Aid, $120 00 

Poor Expenditures, 687 55 

Fire Dept., 643 85 

School Physicians, 100 00 

Town Officers, 1,445 25 

Protection of trees, 502 75 

Tool house addition, 107 00 

Public Library, 350 00 

Contingencies, 706 23 

Tree Warden, 211 78 

Street lighting, 2,446 93 

Elm Street stone road, 2,818 73 

Insurance, 165 00 

Care cemeteries, 100 00 



32 



Smith Academy, 


1,000 00 


Care Memorial Hall, 


147 41 


Sealer of weights and measures, 


99 56 


Bradstreet fill and box culvert, 


2,044 20 


Highways and bridges, 


3,197 56 


Oiling stone roads, 


822 50 


Water rates, 


500 00 


Bonds — Town Officers, 


57 00 


Memorial Day, 


75 00 


Smith Industrial School, 


100 00 


Muster Day, 


110 32 


School Street stone road, 


6,096 59 


Eesurf acing Depot road, 


671 24 


Bradstreet stone road, 


5,062 92 


Sidewalk— North Hatfield, 


108 88 


Schools, maintenance and repairs, 


9,340 42 



$39,838 67 

List of Appropriations voted to be raised at the 
Annual Town Meeting, held March 16, 1913. 

$ 100 for care of Cemeteries, under care V. I. society 
100 for School Physicians 

75 for Memorial Day 

75 for Firemen's Muster 
100 for Tuition — Smith Industrial School 
150 for Care Memorial Hall 

50 for Bonds — Town Officers 
100 for Insurance 
250 for Interest 
100 for Eepairs on Sewers 



33 

500 for Town Water Rates 

350 for Public library 

500 for Depot road — resurfacing of 

800 for Contingencies 

100 for Sidewalk— North Hatfield 
18 for one electric light at Ferry Landing 

500 for Protection of Shade Trees 

350 for Oiling or Watering Stone Roads 
75 for 4 lights — Coffey's Eoad 
7,100 for Schools — maintenance of — and Dog Fund 

500 for School house repairs 
1,000 for Tuition — Smith Academy 
3,200 for Street Electric Lights — already installed 
1,400 for Salaries — Town Officers 
2,000 for ordinary repairs — highways and bridges 
1,000 for care Town Poor 
4,000 for School St. stone rd.— $2,000 from Treasury 



$24,493 Total amount to be assessed on the polls 

and estates of the town for 1913. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN J. BETSOLD, 

M. W. BOYLE, 

J. E. PORTER, 

Selectmen. 



I have this day examined the books of the Select- 
men and find them correct. 

JAS. L. DAY, Auditor. 
Hatfield, March 4, 1914, 



34 



LIST OF JITEOES SUBMITTED BY THE SELECT- 
MEN OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD— 1914. 



Name. 

Bardwell, Frederick T. 
Bardwell, James S. 
Bardwell, Arthur C. 
Belden, Oscar E. 
Billings, Louis A. 
Boyle, William E. 
Boyle, George A. 
Carl, Henry W. 
Crawford, Malcolm 
Cutter, William E. 
Dickinson, Edward N. 
Dippolt, George 
Fitzgerald, David L. 
Graves, Murray B. 
Jubenville, Eugene 
Lovett, Charles 
McGrath, 2d, Eobert J. 
Mullins, Jr. James 
Murphy, William S. 
O'Dea, Thomas M. 
Eyan, Matthew J. 
Slattery, Charles F. 
Smith, Adam J. 
Wade, Charles W. 
Waite, Charles H. 
Weber, Eudolph W. 
Whalen, Patrick J. 
Wight, Leland H. 



Occupation. 
Farmer 



a 



a 



a 



a 



a 



Mechanic 
Farmer 



Mechanic 
Farmer 



Merchant 
Farmer 



a 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in Account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 

Dr. 

To balance in Treasury, $992 86 

To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1912) 3,212 96 
To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1913) 25,826 S9 

Treas. Water Commissioners, 

District Court fines, 

Slaughter Licenses, 

Sealer's Receipts, 

Rent of Town Hall, 

First Parish, sale of land, 

Refunding Dog Fund, 

City of Northampton, use water cart, 

City of Northampton, tuition, 

Town of Whately, tuition, 

City of Boston, 

W. H. Riley & Co., overcharge, 

State Highway Commission, Elm St. Rd., 2,750 00 
National Bank Tax, 668 55 

35 



2,862 


00 


109 48 


10 


00 


50 


26 


48 00 


10 


00 


13? 


44 


16 no 


i.45 


<•:? 


95 66 


33 


M) 




53 



36 

Corporation Tax, 

Street Ey. Tax, 

State Aid, 

Tuition Industrial School, 

Inspection of Animals, 

Supt. of Schools, 

Income Mass. School Fund, 
H. W. Carl, cemetery plot, 
L. L. Pease, for labor at fire, 
Martin Wilks, old plank, 
John Lizork, old plank, 
H. E. Belden, old plank, 
J. W. Kiley, old plank, 
B. M. Warner, old plank, 
P. T. Boyle, stone, 
Jas. L. Day, stone and labor, 
M. McLeod, stone and drawing, 
Mrs. Wm. Hayes, sand and labor, 
Alfred E. Breor, sewer entrance, 
Joseph Schepp, sewer entrance, 
Dennis Whalen, sewer entrance, 
E. Bach & Son, sewer entrance, 
David Mullany, sewer entrance, 
E. F. Fitzgerald, sewer entrance, 
Michael Dulaski, sewer entrance, 
Eoman Eogaleski, sewer entrance, 
E. J. Whalen, sewer entrance and tile, 
Aurin Wood, sewer entrance and tile, 
L. A. & S. F. Billings, sewer entrance, 
Alfred B. Proulx, sewer entrance, 



200 93 


409 55 


120 00 


16 67 


37 50 


572 91 


848 01 


50 


19 00 


4 00 


6 00 


6 00 


10 00 


13 50 


2 65 


20 00 


4 92 


1 00 


33 00 


33 00 


33 00 


33 00 


33 00 


33 00 


33 00 


33 00 


40 40 


39 00 


33 00 


33 00 



$39,672 50 



37 



To cash rec'd from Temporary Loans, 
Northampton Inst, for Sav., $4,000 00 

First National Bank, 15,100 00 





$19,100 00 




$58,772 50 


Cr. 




By cash paid Selectmen's orders, 


$39,838 67 


Interst on Water Bonds, 


2,000 00 


District Court fees, 


95 43 


Bureau of Statistics, 


15 00 


Interest on temporary loans, 


541 76 


State Corporation Tax, 


4 64 


State National Bank Tax, 


45 94 


County Tax, 


1,947 26 


State Tax, 


3,200 00 


State Tax, repairs State Highway, 


177 00 


Treas. Sinking Fund, 


861 67 


Balance in Treasury, 


45 13 


By cash paid Temporary Notes, 




Northampton Institution for Savings, 


2,000 00 


First National Bank, 


8,000 00 



$58,772 50 
IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR. 

(1912 Taxes.) 

Dr. 

To cash received, $3,212 96 

Assessors' orders of Abmts, 36 00 

$3,248 96 



38 

Cr. 

By uncollected taxes, $3,167 02 

Interest collected, 63 94 

Addition to Warrant, 18 00 



$3,248 96 



(1913 Taxes.) 

Dr. 

To cash received, $25,826 89 

Uncollected taxes, 4,412 43 

Discount on Taxes, 497 25 

Assessors' orders of abatements, 12 49 



$30,749 06 

Cr. 

By Assessors' Warrant, $29,632 70 

Addition to Warrant, 1,084 19 

Interest collected, 32 17 

$30,749 06 



I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collector 
and find that he has been credited by the Treasurer, 
with the amount of $3,212.96 of the taxes of 1912; and 
$25,826.89 of the taxes of 1913. 

JAS. L. DAY, Auditor. 
March 4th, 1914. 



39 
WATER SINKING FUND. 

Dr. 

To thirty years four per cent. Water Bonds, $50,000 00 

Cr. 
By Sinking Fund, $20,657 93 

SUMMARY OF TOWN ACCOUNT. 

Dr. 

To outstanding Note, due April 1, 1914, $4,000 00 

Bills due March 1, 1914, unpaid, 1,330 00 



$5,330 00 



Cr. 



By uncollected taxes, 1913, $4,412 43 

Due from State Aid, 

State, Smith School, 

Sewer Assessments, 

Sidewalk Assessments, 
Balance in Treasury, 



Balance against the town, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, Treasurer. 



120 00 


50 00 


352 93 


189 32 


45 13 


$5,169 81 


$160 19 



40 

I have examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the town of Hatfield for the year ending 
March 1, 1914, and find them correct. I find Select- 
men's orders on file to the amount of thirty-nine thous- 
and eight hundred thirty-eight dollars and sixty-seven 
cents, ($39,838.67) with evidence of their payment by 
him. Also, cancelled notes and receipts for State and 
County taxes and interest paid. 

I find a balance in the Treasury of forty-five dol- 
lars and thirteen cents ($45.13.) 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 
Hatfield, March 4, 1914. 

Several amounts in Savings Bank payable to Treas- 
urer; all but two funds for care of Cemetery Plots. 

Charlotte G. Wilkie Fund, $1,494 67 

Silas Porter fund, 568 44 

Edward C. Billings fund, 500 00 

Augusta Wells fund, 332 71 

Oliver Warner fund, 50 00 

John H. Sanderson fund, 100 00 

Luman M. Moore fund, 202 76 

Abby Dickinson fund, 91 67 

Lucy L. Morton fund, 204 82 

Charles Smith fund, 101 81 

Lemuel B. Field fund, 100 54 

Eufus H. Cowles fund, 100 00 

Charles E. Hubbard fund, 100 00 

Alpheus Cowles fund, 100 00 

Hannah W. Smith fund, 22 93 



Water Commissioner's 
Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the 
eighteenth annual report of the Board of Water Com- 
missioners. 

We have received the past year as follows: 
Balance of cash from last year's account, $2 55 

Cash from Collection of Water Rates, 4,570 79 

For damage to freight B. & M. R. R. Co., 1 90 



We have paid the past year as follows 

Town of Hatfield from water rates, 
Crittenden & Munson, printing, 
'Connor & McGrath, lead, 
W. H. Riley & Co., supplies, 
Norwood Engineering Co., supplies, 
David Billings, 7% acres of land, 
Edson W. Strong, collection of water rates, 
Edson W. Strong, labor and cash paid, 
Register of Deeds, recording deed, 
Balance cash on hand, 



41 



$4,575 24 


$2,862 00 


15 00 


19 20 


186 82 


57 00 


375 00 


137 11 


110 30 


1 05 


811 76 



$4,575 24 



42 

The total cost of the water works to March 1, 
1914, is $61,403.14. 

There are now 419 connections with private prop- 
erty, 97 fire hydrants, 5 water tanks, and water in 5 
school houses and in Memorial Hall. 



There are now 18,781 feet of 8 in. pipe. 



49,680 < 


c 6 


35,206 ' 


« 4 


1,757 ' 


t 2 


10,658 l 


i x 


1,070 ' 


1 % " 



Total, 



117,152 feet or over 22 miles. 



We have the past year purchased of the heirs of 
Eoswell Billings and David Billings, seven and one- 
half acres of land on the west side of Running Gutter 
Brook at a cost of $375, and have made a contract for 
the purchase of water pipe to relay the main on the 
Straits Eoad as far as the home of Dennis Reagan. 

We are often asked how we know that the purity 
of the water is maintained. Each month two large 
bottles of the water are sent to the State Board of 
Health at Boston and their report is sent to the Com- 
missioners. 

M. J. PROULX, 
DANIEL W. WELLS, 
ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Hatfield Water Commissioners. 



43 

Hatfield, Mass., March 2, 1914. 

I have this day examined the books and accounts 
of the Treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the 
Town of Hatfield and find them correct with vouchers 
on file for all payments made. 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 

Hatfield, Mass., March 2, 1914. 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics for the town of Hatfield for the 
year 1913 are as follows: 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS 





No. 


Males. 


Females, 


January, 

February, 

March, 


7 
6 

8 


5 
2 
4 


2 
4 
4 


April, 

May, 

June, 


5 

7 
2 


2 
4 
1 


3 
3 
1 


July, 
August, 
September, 
October, 


9 

11 

6 

4 


5 

8 
4 

2 


4 
3 

2 
2 


November, 


9 


5 


4 


December, 


7 


4 


3 



81 



44 



46 



35 



45 
BIETHPLACE OF PAEENTS 



Born in Canada, 
United States, 
Poland, 
Germany, 
Hungary, 
Nova Scotia, 



Father 


Mother 





1 


20 


23 


50 


47 


2 


2 


8 


8 


1 






81 81 



BIETHS FOE THE FIVE PEEVIOUS YEAES, 

1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 
92 64 79 69 74 

MAEEIAGES BY MONTHS. 

No. 

January, 3 

February, 

March, 

April, 5 

May, 

June, 1 

July, 

August, 2 

September, 4 

October, 5 

November, 5 

December, 1 



26 



46 

First marriage of both parties, 25. 

Second marriage of groom, first of bride, 1 

The oldest and youngest grooms, were 62 and 20 
years of age respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were 41 and 17 
years of age respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED 





Groom. 


Bride. 


i in United States, 


3 


3 


Poland, 


22 


22 


Germany, 


1 


1 



26 



26 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 

September, 



.908 1909 1910 


L911 


1912 




21 33 26 


22 


32 




DEATHS BY MONTHS. 




No. 




Males. 


Females, 


1 




1 





2 




1 


1 


3 







3 


5 







5 


4 




1 


3 


1 




1 





4 




2 


2 


1 







1 














47 



October, 2 2 

November, 3 2 1 

December, 2 2 



28 10 18 



No. 


Males. 


Females, 


2 


1 


1 


3 





3 


2 


1 


1 











2 


1 


1 


1 





1 











5 


2 


3 


6 


3 


3 


5 


2 


3 


2 





2 



Under 1 year of age, 

Between 1 and 5 years, 
Between 10 and 20 years, 
Between 20 and 30 years, 
Between 30 and 40 years, 
Between 40 and 50 years, 
Between 50 and 60 years, 
Between 60 and 70 years, 
Between 70 and 80 years, 
Between 80 and 90 years, 
Between 90 and 100 years, 



28 10 18 

Age of oldest person deceased (female) 92 years. 

CAUSES OF DEATH. 

Classified according to the nomenclature adopted 
by the State Board of Registration. 

Constitutional Diseases. 

Epilepsy, 1 

Senility, 2 

Paralysis, 1 



48 

Locomotor Ataxia, 1 

Premature Births, 1 

Still birth, 1 

Atheroma, 1 

Cerebral Hemorrhages, 2 

Arteria-Sclerosis, 3 

Endocarditis, 2 

Carcinoma of Liver, 1 

Tubercular Miningitis, 1 

LOCAL DISEASES. 

Biliary Calenti, 1 

Cancer of Ovary, 1 

Pneumonia, 2 

Heart Disease, 1 

Anterior-Poliomyelitis, 1 

Chronic Nephritis, 3 

Violent Deaths. 

Accidental fall from bicycle, 1 

Found dead, 1 

NAMES OF PEESONS DECEASED. 

Hiram Graves, Caroline Natorwitcz, 

Mary Karen, Martha J. Bardwell, 

Catherine Murphy, Eeka Wenzel, 

Alice C. Field, Frederick Carl, 

Cornelius E. Hurley, Louisa B. Porter, 

Elizabeth LaMountain, Jane M. Elwell, 

Magdalina Slusars, Sophia W. Cowles, 



49 

Votsech Kugler, Ellen Sheehan, 

John Karen, Anna G. Carl, 

Rufus H. Cowles, Harlan P. Tisdale, 

Augusta S. Brown, Susie Vochula, 

Leonara Bielecki, Abigail M. Bottomley, 

John McHugh, Anthony Douglas, 
Mysam Waite. 

DOG LICENSES. 

The number of dogs licensed during the year end- 
ing Nov. 30, 1913, with the receipts and settlements of 
the account with the County Treasury, is as follows : — 



75 male dogs at $2 each, 


$150 00 




4 female dogs at $5 each, 


20 00 


$170 00 


Less fees, 79 dogs at 20 cents each, 




15 80 


Paid County Treasurer, 


$154 80 


Respectfully submitted, 




L. H. KINGSLEY, 






Town Clerk. 



Assessor's Report 



Value of assessed personal estate, 


$421,276 




Value of assessed real estate, 


1,365,813 




Total value of assessed estate, 


$1,787,089 


Value of assessed buildings, 


$761,779 




Value of assessed land, 


604,034 






$1,365,813 


No. polls assessed, 




609 


Residents assessed on property, 




388 


Non-residents assessed on property, 


78 


For poll tax only, 




338 


Rate of tax per $1000, 




$15.90 


No. of horses assessed, 




501 


Cows, 




269 


Neat cattle, 




28 


Swine, 




13 


Fowls, 




40 


Dwelling houses, 




348 


Acres of land, 




9,258 


State tax, i 


£3,377 00 




County tax, 


1,947 26 





50 



51 

Town tax, 23,693 00 

Overlayings, 615 44 



$29,632 70 
Estimated bank and corporation tax, 1,000 00 

Excise tax, 768 11 

Omitted assessment, 316 08 

Valne of property exempt from taxation under 
Chapter 490, Acts of 1909. 
Literary institutions, $76,152 

Church property, 31,650 



$107,802 

Eespectfully submitted, 

EDSON W. STRONG, 
P. W. MULLINS, 
L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield. . 



Report of Sinking Fund 
Commission 



We have the following amounts placed to the cred- 
it of the Sinking Fund: 

Boston & Maine Eailroad Bonds, $3,000 00 

N. Y., N. H. & H. Eailroad Bonds, 2,000 00 

Springfield Street Railway Bonds, 1,000 00 

Town of Hatfield Water Bonds, 7,000 00 

Union Trust Co., Springfield, 2,251 55 

Springfield Institution for Savings, 1,010 08 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, 1,033 96 

Northampton Institution for Savings, 1,100 30 

Florence Savings Bank, 1,195 14 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, 419 23 

Haydenville Savings Bank, 326 62 

Easthampton Savings Bank, 321 05 



$20,657 93 



M. J. EYAN, 
E. S. WAENEE, 
L. J. PELISSIEE, 
Sinking Fund Commissioners. 

52 



53 

I have this day examined the accounts of the Sink- 
ing Fund Commissioners and find them correct. 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 

Hatfield, Mass., March 2, 1914. 



List of Books Added to the Library 
Since March 1, 1913 



Children's Books. 



The Tale of Timmy Tiptoes, 
The Tale of Benjamin Bunny 
The Tale of Pigling Bland, 
The Tale of Tom Kitten, 
The Tale of Tiggy Winkle, 
The Tale of Mr. Tod, 
The Tailor of Gloucester, 
The Adventures of Peter 

Cottontail, 
The Story of the Teasing 

Monkey, 
The Adventures of Unc' Billy 

Possum, 



Beatrix 
Beatrix 
Beatrix 
Beatrix 
Beatrix 
Beatrix 
Beatrix 



Potter. 
Potter. 
Potter. 
Potter. 
Potter. 
Potter. 
Potter. 



Thornton W. Burgess. 



Thornton W. Burgess. 



Thornton W. Burgess. 



Young People's Books. 



How Other People Live. 

(Pictures of many Lands). 
Wigwam Evenings, 
The Boy Scouts of Woodcraft 

Camp, 
Manuel in Mexico, 
Kathleen in Scotland, 



H. C. Barnard. 

C. A. and E. G. Eastman. 

Thornton W. Burgess. 
Etta B. McDonald. 
Etta B. McDonald. 



54 



55 



Donald in Scotland, 
Betty in Canada, 
Marta in Holland, 
Fritz in Germany, 



Etta B. McDonald. 

Etta B. McDonald. 

Etta B. McDonald. 

Etta B. McDonald. 



Girls' Books. 



Betty Tucker's Ambition, 
A Little Maid of Provence 

Town, 
Glenloch Girls at Camp West, 
Nancy Lee's Spring Term, 
Nobody's Rose, 
Polly-Anna, 

Faith Palmer at the Oaks, 
The Colonel's Experiment, 



Angelina W. Wray. 

Alice T. Curtis. 
Grace M. Remick. 
Margaret Ward. 
Adele E. Thompson. 
Eleanor H. Porter. 
Lazelle T. Wooley. 
Edith B. Delano. 



Boys' Books. 



Ned Brewster's Bear Hunt, 
The Boy Scouts of Woodcraft 

Camp, 
The Young Trappers, 



Chauncey J. Hawkens. 

Thornton W. Burgess. 
Hugh Pendexter. 



Adult Fiction. 



Told in the Hills, 

The Sanctuary, 

I he Moving Finger, 

The House of Happiness, 

The Lady and the Pirate, 

Inside of the Cup, 

Big Fellow, 

Laddie, 

The Taste of Apples, 

Westways, 



March E. Ryan. 
Maude H. Peterson. 
E. P. Oppenheim. 
Kate L. Bosher. 
Emerson Hough. 
Winston Churchill. 
Frederic Palmer. 
Gene Stratton Porter. 
Jeannette Lee. 
S. Weir Mitchell. 



56 



Desert Gold, 

The Broken Halo, 

The Iron Woman, 

Woman thou gavest me, 

The Amateur Gentleman, 

Old Rose and Silver, 

Threads of Gold and Silver, 

Sunshine Jane, 

Love Affair of a Homely 
Girl, 

The Riverman, 

Shadow, 

Ranching for Sylva, 

Judgment House, 

Janet Ward, 

Sally Castleton, Southerner, 

Hand-made Gentleman, 

Wilsam, 

Gold Trail, 

V. V.'s Eyes, 

One Million Frances, 

Maggie Pepper, 

Golden Web, 

Jim Hands, 

Glory of the Conquered, 

Pictures of Polly, 

Friar Tuck, 

Mrs. Red Pepper, 

Impossible Boy, 

Green C, 

Freebooters of the Wilder- 
ness, 

Cage, 

"Charge it," 

The Best Man, 

Andrew the Glad, 

The Bugles of Gettysourg, 



Zane Gray. 
Florence Barclay. 
Rex Beach. 
Hall Caine. 
Jeffrey Fernold. 
Myrtle Reed. 
Myrtle Reed. 
Anne Warner. 

Jean L. DeForest. 
Stewart Edward White. 
Harold Begbie. 
Harold Bindloss. 
Gilbert Parker. 
Margaret Sangster. 
Crittenden Merriott. 
Irving Batcheller. 
S. C. Nethersole. 
Harold Bindloss. 
Henry Sydnor Harrison. 
Arnold Frederics. 
Charles Klein. 
Anthony Partridge. 
R. W. Childs. 
Susan Gaskell. 
Mary K. Courtney. 
Robert A. Wason. 
Grace S. Richmond. 
Nina W. Pulman. 
J. A. Meyer. 

Agnes C. Loret. 
Harold Begbie. 
Irving Bachellor. 
Grace L. H. Lutz. 
Maria T. Daviess. 
LaSalle Corbell Picket. 



57 



Stella Marls, 

The Eagle's Mate, 

The People's Man, 

T. Tambarom, 

Waitstill Baxter, 

Within the Law, 

A Garden of Spices, 

The Manager of the B. and A., 

The Flying Girl, 



William J. Locke. 
Anna Alice Chapin. 
E. P. Oppenheim. 
Frances H. Burnett. 
Kate Douglass Wiggin. 
Bayard Vaillard. 
A. Keith Fraser. 
Vaughan Kester. 
Edith VanDyne. 



Other Books. 



Gold, 

Uncle Sam Wonder Worker, 

Life of Raphael, 

The Friendly Road, 

Mr. Pratt's Patients, 

American Highways and By-ways of 

the Pacific Coast, 
Crowds Jr., 
Home Furnishings, 
Shelter and Clothing, 
Signs and Seasons, 
Leaf and Tendril, 
Bird and Bough, 
Winter Sunshine, 
Little talks with mothers of little 

people, 
Music Lovers Encyclopedia. 
Lullabies of Many Lands. 
Book of Home Building and Decora- 
tion. 

Desired Woman, Harben. 

Partners, Margaret Deland. 

Golden Road, Montgomery. 

Miss Billy, Porter. 

Miss Billy's Decision, Porter. 



Stewart Edward White. 
W. A. DuPuy. 
Henry Strachey. 
David Grayson. 
Joseph Lincoln. 

C. Johnson. 

Gerald Stanley Lee. 

Hunter. 

Kinne. 

John Buroughs. 

John Buroughs. 

John Buroughs. 

John Buroughs. 



58 



Miss Billy Married, Porter. 

Way Home, King. 

My Lady of the Chimney Corner, Irvine. 



Adult Fiction. 



Southener, 

Happy Hawkins, 

Lonely Queen, 

Where there's a Will, 

Right of the Strongest, 

Honor of the Big Snows, 

Call of the Cumberlands, 

Wilderness trail, 

Hager, 

Bella Donna, 

Freckles, 

Garden of Allah, 

Daughter of the Rich, 

American Ideals, Character and Life, H. W. Mabie. 

Cracow. The Royal Capitol of Ancient 



Thomas Dixon. 

R. A. Wason. 

H. C. Bailey. 

Mary K. Rinekart. 

Frances N. Greene. 

James O. Curwood. 

Charles N. Buck. 

Frank Williams. 

Mary Johnson. 

Hichins. 

G. S. Porter. 

Hichens. 

Mary E. Waller. 



Poland, 
The Song Lore of Ireland, 
Romance of old New England 

Churches, 
John James Audibon, 
The Country School, 
Farm Boys and Girls, 
A Hermit's Wild Friends, 
Literary Pilgrimages of a Naturalist, Winthrop Pachard. 
Wild Flowers every Child Should 



Leonard Lepsky. 
Redfern Mason. 

Mary C. Crawford. 
John Burroughs. 
Clifton Johnson. 
L. H. Bailey. 
Mason A. Walton. 



Know, 
Trees Every Child Should Know, 
Birds Every Child Should Know, 
Stories of Great Musicians, 
Hoosic Valley. 
Musical Sketches. 



F. W. Stack. 
Julia E. Rogers. 
Neltjie Blanchan. 
Katherine L. Scobey. 



59 



Reminiscences of Jostin McCarty. 

(2 volumes.) 
Nathan Sites Hills, 
Broken Wall, 

Health, Strength and Happiness, 
Science and Health, 
College Girl of America, 
Country Life Movement, 
How to Grow Vegetables, 
Manuel of Practice Farming, 
Abraham Lincoln, the Boy and the 

Man. 
Panama Canal, 
American Child, 

Parmer boy who became a Bishop. 
Government Positions. 



S. M. Sites. 
Edward A. Steiner. 
Saleeby. 

Mary Baker Eddy. 
M. C. Crawford. 
Liberty H. Baily. 
Allen French. 
J. McLennon. 



Logan Marshall. 
Elizabeth McCracken. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



-OF THE- 



School Committee 



AND 



Superintendent of Schools 



-OF THE- 



Town of Hatfield 



-FOR THE- 



Year Ending March 1, 1914 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Arthur R. Breor, Chairman, Term expires 1916 

John F. 'Dea, Secretary, Term expires 1914 

Thaddeus Graves, Term expires 1915 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

Clinton J. Richards, 

22 Prospect Avenue, Northampton 

Telephone 858-W 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield 
schools.) 

C. A. Byrne, M. D., (Hill, Bradstreet and West Hat- 
field).) 

TRUANT OFFICER 

S. W. Kingsley. 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Spring Term begins March 30, 1914, ends June 5, 1914. 
Fall Term begins Sept. 8, 1914, ends Dec. 18, 1914. 
"Winter Term begins Jan. 4, 1915, ends March 19, 1915. 
Spring Term begins March 29, 1915, ends June 4, 1915. 

63 



Report of School Committee 



The work done by our schools for the past year 
has been on the whole very satisfactory. All depart- 
ments have worked together in harmony. Onr teach- 
ing force is one of the best we have ever had. To have 
good schools we must have good teachers and to have 
good teachers we must pay salaries large enough to at- 
tract and keep them. It is poor economy to engage 
any who are not the best that we can afford. 

The Hill school building has been completely re- 
paired both inside and out. The porch has been re- 
paired, the outside wood-work painted, new floors and 
ceiling have been added, and with the new shades and 
freshly tinted walls it contains the two most attractive 
school rooms in town. 

Minor repairs have also been made on all the other 
school buildings in town. More extensive repairs will 
be needed before many years. The heating, ventilat- 
ing and sanitary arrangements are not entirely satis- 
factory, and new seats and desks should be placed in at 
least two rooms, but the Committee do not feel like ask- 
ing for any special appropriation for repairs at this 
time. 

64 



65 

At the beginning of the year we had more than one 
hundred pupils at the Center for whom we had no pub- 
lic school accommodations. By the courtesy of the 
Trustees of Smith Academy the four upper grades are 
cared for in two rooms at the Academy building. The 
first and second grades are given half time work, the 
first grade attending the forenoon session at the Center 
First Primary and Hill Primary, and the second grade 
taking their places in the afternoon with the same 
teachers. This is not a satisfactory arrangement for 
either pupils or teachers, but it seemed to be the best 
solution of the difficulty. If for any reason it should 
be necessary to follow this plan for the whole or any 
part of another school year, we believe that enough 
teachers should be hired so that they may not have to 
do double work, and that the part time pupils may have 
a somewhat longer session. 

NEW BUILDING. 

It may be in order to give here a brief summary of 
what has been done to provide suitable accommoda- 
tions for the Hatfield Center children. 

At the last annual meeting a committee was ap- 
pointed to investigate school conditions and make rec- 
ommendations for the action of the town The com- 
mittee consisted of the Selectmen — John E. Porter, 
Michael W. Boyle and John J. Betsold; the School 
Committee — Arthur E. Breor, Thaddeus Graves, and 
John F. O'Dea; and three others appointed by them — 
Matthew J. Ryan, Oscar E. Belden, and Herbert D. 
Smith. 



66 

This committee organized with Arthur E. Breor, 
Chairman, and Oscar E. Belden, Secretary, and ap- 
pointed as a sub-committee Messrs. Boyle, Belden, and 
Breor to make special investigations. After looking 
into local conditions and visiting several buildings in 
other towns the sub-committee reported to the full com- 
mittee. After careful consideration it was decided to 
recommend an eight room building to be erected on the 
vacant lot opposite Smith Academy, and Mr. Karl Put- 
nam, Architect, of Northampton, was asked to present 
preliminary plans to a special town meeting held Tues- 
day, Jan. 20, 1914. 

At this meeting the sum of $40,000 was appropriat- 
ed by a unanimous vote for the construction of an 
eight-room building as shown by Mr. Putnam and rec- 
ommended by the Committee. 

At the time of writing this report, the specifica- 
tions are in the hands of contractors for bids on con- 
struction, and it is the hope of the Committee that we 
may have the building ready for use for the next school 
year. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

For Fiscal Year Ending March 1, 1914. 

Eesources. 

From Town: 

General Appropriation, $7,100 00 

Eepairs, 500 00 

Dog Fund, 137 44 

$7,737 44 



67 



From Tuition: 




City Wards, 


$ 33 50 


Northampton, 


145 83 


Whately, 


95 66 




^074 qq 




<LJp^J 1 tfc UZf 


From State: 




School Fund, 


$ 848 01 


Superintendent of Schools, 


572 91 




$1,420 92 


Total Eesources, 


$9,433 35 


Expenditures. 




Salaries : 




Teachers, 


$5,109 00 


School Committee, 


65 00 


Supervisor of Music, 


232 00 


Janitors, 


763 25 


Supt. of Schools, 


649 59 


Truant Officer, 


6 00 




$6,824 84 


Books and supplies, 


682 80 


Fuel, 


495 82 


Eepairs, 


1,059 09 


Transportation, 


172 06 


Miscellaneous, 


105 81 


Total Expenditures, 


$9,340 42 


Balance Unexpended, 


$92 93 


ABTHTJB E. BREOE, 




Chairman. 






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Cambridge 

Hadley 

Hatfield 

Hatfield 

Hatfield 

Broad Brook, Ct. 

Granby, Ct. 

Northampton 

Hatffeld 

Natick 

North Hadley 

Johnson, Vt. 

Hatfield 




CO 


Venice A. Hough 
Marguerite A. Flaherty 
Constance C. Breor 
Sarah V. Kiley 
Margaret A. Ryan 
Pearl N. Sadd 
Gladys L. Rice 
Margaret B. Sazama 
Lena H. Proulx 
Nellie T. O'Brien 
Christine Hibbard 
Gladys V. Rand 
Maud K. Boyle 




CO 

O 

o 

W 
a 

CO 


Center Grammar < 

Center 1st Primary 
Center 2nd Primary 
Center 3d Primary 
Hill Grammar 
Hill Primary 
West Grammar 
West Primary 
North Grammar 
North Primary 
Bradstreet 
Supr. of Music 


CO 

O 



Superintendent's Report 



The end of another year finds the schools of Hat- 
field in excellent working condition so far as the some- 
what limited accommodations will permit. It is prob- 
able that the action recently taken by the town in pro- 
viding for a modern eight-room building at the Cent x 
marks the greatest advance towards better school con- 
ditions ever made in any year in its history. That 
such a building was necessary will be apparent to any 
who will consider the number of pupils to be cared for 
and the present inadequate accommodations. 

Since 1905 the average annual birthrate has been 
a little more than 72. In 1911 our schools were begin- 
ning to feel the effect of this larger birthrate. T\e 
actual school enrollment in October of that year was 
315. In October 1912, it was 340, and in 1913 it had 
risen to 374. Two-thirds of these pupils attend at the 
Hill and Center schools. If the enrollment continues 
to increase as indicated by these figures, the town will 
have 500 children in its schools within a few years. 

69 



70 
RURAL SCHOOL EFFICIENCY. 

The large problem to be solved by school officials 
is bow to increase the efficiency of our school system — 
to get the largest possible returns for the money and 
effort expended. This involves several elements, in- 
cluding the means used, the agencies employed, and the 
results as shown in the character and attainments of 
pupils. By considering some of these elements of effi- 
ciency in what would be an ideal system we may by 
comparison get a clearer idea of local conditions and 
needs. 

1. The School Grounds should be ample to fur- 
nish pupils opportunity for exercise and play without 
using the highway or trespassing on private property. 
They should usually be fenced and some attempt should 
be made to add to their attractiveness by means of in- 
expensive trees, shrubs and vines. 

2. The School Building should be well-built and 
attractive. The rooms should be large enough to seat 
all pupils at single aduj stable desks. The light should 
come from only one or two sides of the room, either all 
from left or from left and rear, the window space be- 
ing at least one-fifth of floor space. Adequate heat 
and ventilation should be provided either by a furnace 
in basement or by a jacketed stove. The walls should 
be appropriately tinted and adorned with a few well- 
chosen pictures. Sufficient room should be afforded to 
care for clothing not needed in the school room. There 
should be an abundant supply of pure water for drink- 
ing and cleanliness. Separate sanitaries or outbuild- 



71 

ings should be provided, and so built and cared for that 
they may not be a menace to either the health or morals 
of pupils. 

3. The Equipment should include all books and 
supplies necessary to carry on the work called for in 
the course of study. Some of the other articles need- 
ed are wall maps, sets of dry and liquid measures, and 
simple tools and apparatus required for work in practi- 
cal arts. 

4. The Janitor service in a two-room building is 
much simpler than in the larger buildings, but the 
working efficiency of any school depends in large meas- 
ure on the care that is given to the building, That it 
should be kept clean and decent and that a temperature 
of about 68 degrees should be maintained in the school 
room during cold weather, will be readily admitted — 
but not so easily realized unless the janitor knows his 
business and attends to it. 

5. The Course of Study should emphasize a thor- 
ough knowledge of those subjects which have been 
found by universal experience to be fundamental and 
necessary. 

The Boston School Committee in a recent report 
makes this statement, which applies as well to Hatfield 
as to Boston: "The School Committee has long felt that 
one of the most important matters to which its most 
earnest and careful attention should be directed is the 
raising of the elementary schools to a higher standard 
of efficiency and the teaching of the fundamentals of 
education, more especially the three B's, more thor- 



72 

oughly, more practically and more successfully than 
they have ever been taught before to make sure that 
each boy and girl shall, upon leaving the elementary 
schools, be able to express his thoughts clearly and in- 
telligently both by spoken and written words; to spell 
correctly; to write legibly; and to perform quickly and 
accurately the simpler processes of arithmetic that are 
in common use. ' ' 

To these fundamentals should be added those other 
subjects which give broader views of life and its oppor- 
tunities. If it is a mistake to neglect the three R's, 
it is also a mistake not to attempt to give the child at 
least a speaking acquaintance with the more liberal 
branches. A well balanced course of study should fit 
a child to live as well as to get a living. It must in- 
clude music, literature, and art, as well as history, geog- 
raphy, elementary science, hygiene, and civics. And in 
all these studies, incidentally, if not as separate exer- 
cises, the principles of good morals and correct conduct 
must be taught and exemplified. 

It is coming to be generally recognized, also, that 
education of the hand is nearly as important as that of 
the head. Our State Board of Education is emphasiz- 
ing the work in practical arts and our most successful 
teachers are proving that the introduction of such work 
does not take away from the other branches but rather 
supports and vitalizes them. 

6. The School Officials, consisting of Committee 
and Superintendent, constitute an important element in 
the system. In their administrative and supervisory 
capacity they are given a large measure of responsi- 



73 

bility. They should have the ability not only to inter- 
pret public opinion but to give it form and direction to 
some extent. They should have good business sense and 
be able and willing to give something more than the 
odds and ends of time to school affairs. 

7. The State is becoming every year a more im- 
portant factor in the development of the rural school. 
Many towns have been encouraged if not forced to 
adopt progressive measures through State influence. 
Through the administration of the State funds the 
Board has made it possible for towns to secure better 
supervision, teachers and equipment. And the end is 
not yet. 

8. The Community is the court of final appeal. It 
can make or mar the success of any school official, 
teacher, or system. It pays taxes to support the 
schools and furnishes pupils for them. In the long run 
the community will get the kind of school it wants. 
For the character of a school is determined not so 
much by externals as by the attitude of the citizens, 
pupils and teachers towards one another and the work 
to be done. If the schools in any town are not what 
they ought to be, it is either because the people do not 
understand the conditions, or else do not have sufficient 
interest to attempt to remedy them. 

9. The Teacher is the most vital and important 
factor in the whole school system. Though all the oth- 
or elements of efficiency are supplied, they count for 
nothing with an inefficient teacher in charge. Con- 
versely, a good teacher will make up in large measure 
for many deficiencies in other parts of the system. He 



74 

should be a person of broad culture, generous education, 
and thorough training. But training and education 
count for but very little without the natural qualifica- 
tions which every successful teacher must possess. 
Some of these are health, character, tact, adaptability, 
a love for children, capacity for growth, and a willing- 
ness to work. The most successful rural teachers are 
generally those reared in the country, who understand 
and like the country, and who are not using their places 
simply as stepping stones to city positions. 

It is difficult to secure and retain teachers having 
the qualifications mentioned for the salaries that the 
smaller towns can afford to pay. There is a possibili- 
ty that this may be remedied in part by a bill now be- 
fore the State Legislature which provides for a pre- 
mium to be added to the salaries of rural teachers of 
proved efficiency. 

10. The Pupils' improvement — physical, mental, 
and moral — is the final test of the efficiency of a school 
system. If the schools do not turn out well-equipped 
pupils as their product, then an analysis of the situa- 
tion will show weakness in one or more of the elements 
of efficiency. And just in proportion as these nine ele- 
ments are effective will any school system be able to 
produce boys and girls who will have capacity for 
wholesome living, helpful service, and intelligent citi- 
zenship. 

TEACHERS' MEETINGS. 

A meeting of the teachers of the elementary 
schools of the district was held at Hatfield early in the 



75 

fall term. At this meeting plans for organizing and 
carrying on the work of the grade schools were out- 
lined and discussed. 

Later in the season a high school conference was 
held at Beerfield. This conference included those en- 
gaged in high school work in several adjoining rural 
districts together with their superintendents. 

In February of this year, the third and last district 
meeting was held at Hopkins Acadamy, Hadley. Ev- 
ery teacher in both the elementary and high schools of 
the district was present. Questions of common inter- 
est to all the schools were considered. An exhibit of 
penmanship and practical arts was one of the features 
of this meeting. 

Mr. Julius E. Warren and Mr. Clarence D. King- 
sley, agents of the State Board of Education, Mr. W. E. 
Riley, of the Lowell Normal School, Miss Hannah P. 
Waterman of the North Adams Normal School, and 
Prof. W. E. Hart of the Mass. Agricultural College 
were among those who contributed to the success of 
the meetings. 

TEXTBOOKS. 

The Merrill Spellers were introduced this year in 
all the elementary schools of the superintendency union 
of which Hatfield forms a part. Less words are being 
taught and special attention is given to those most of- 
ten misspelled. To stimulate the interest in spelling 
a contest was arranged for the winter term between the 
Hatfield Center and the Hadley Center Grammar 



76 

Schools. The Hatfield pupils, accompanied by their 
teachers, went to Hadley one afternoon on a special car 
and the Hadley pupils plan to return the visit sometime 
during the spring term. 

The Woods Hutchinson Physiologies have been 
used for a year in one town of the District with excel- 
lent results. I would recommend that these books 
be introduced in place of the series now in use. 

It will be necessary to buy new histories for the 
grammar grades the coming year, and this would be a 
favorable time to change for a better book. Another 
elementary history text for the sixth grade should also 
be provided. 

The New Frye Geographies are giving good satis- 
faction in the lower grades. It is proposed to finish 
the introduction in the upper grades during the coming 
school year. 

Hardly a school is provided with sufficient wall 
maps, and there is only one really good globe in town. 
Such useful adjuncts to the study of geography and 
history should surely be available for every school. 

Pupils generally bring from home much of the ma- 
terial used for the practical arts work, but to carry on 
the work properly in some lines it may be necessary to 
supply some simple tools, utensils, and supplies. The 
cost of these is trifling compared with the value derived 
from their use. 

HEALTH. 

The health of pupils should be safeguarded at all 
points, for without health education is of little value. 



77 

Several suggestions made in the superintendent's re- 
port for 1911-12 have not yet been carried into effect, 
but we hope to see practically all adopted in the near 
future. 

Hatfield is fortunate in having two very efficient 
and faithful Medical Inspectors. It is largely through 
their action that we have been able to hold contagious 
diseases in check so successfully during the past two 
years. They have also assisted in the effort necessary 
to secure compliance with the law relating to vaccina- 
tion. 

NEW LABOR LAW. 

A new law passed by the last state legislature re- 
quires every person under twenty-one working in a 
shop, store, or factory to have a certificate issued by the 
school superintendent of the town in which the person 
lives. Four forms of certificates are issued: (1) Spec- 
ial Home Permits for persons 14 to 16 years of age to 
engage in profitable employment at home; (2) Employ- 
ment Certificates for persons 14 to 16 who wish to work 
in a shop, store, or factory; (3) Working Certificates 
for persons 16 to 21 who cannot read and write Eng- 
lish, and (4) Working Certificates for persons 16 to 21 
who can read and write English. The law provides 
that the superintendent may appoint some one in each 
town to act for him in issuing certificates. For the 
convenience of Hatfield people, Mr. L. H. Kingsley has 
kindly consented to serve in this capacity. 

The larger part of the certificates issued were for 
illiterates. The law requires that they shall attend 



Report of Supervisor of Music 



In submitting a report of the work in music I will 
say that it has been carried along the same lines as in 
former years; namely, song drill, individual work, 
sight singing, and theory. We may fairly say that 
progress has been made during the past year. 

Our aim is that every child shall acquire a thor- 
ough knowledge of the essentials of music, and shall 
appreciate all that is best in music. 

Many thanks are due the grade teachers for their 
faithful perseverance, for without their co-operation 
but very little could be accomplished in this line of 
work. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



80 



Medical Supervisor's Report 



The schools have been particularly free from sick- 
ness the past year. 

Two school buildings have several times been in 
danger of epidemic on account of pupils affected, but 
with fumigation and other care such danger has 
passed. 

The prospect of a new, hygienic building in the 
near future fosters the hope that conditions may be im- 
proved in all of the present buildings, giving the town 
a chance to abandon one of the least hygienic of all of 
its school buildings. 

CHAS. A. BYBNE, 

A. J. BONNEVILLE. 



81 



ANNUAL REPORT 



-OF THE- 



TOWN OFFICERS 



-OF THE- 




■]'■ ■ .: 






^\ 



w 



Town of Hatfield 



FOR THE- 



Year Ending December 31 1914 



PRESS OF THE 

HERALD JOB PRINT 

NORTHAMPTON 



Finance Committee 



To the Voters of the Town of Hatfield-. — 

Gentlemen: — The following necessary appropria- 
tions and improvements are hereby recommended for 
the ensuing year by your Finance Committee. 

Obligations already voted on and to be assessed in 
1915:— 

Bradstreet Stone Road— Note $2,500.00 

Bradstreet Stone Road— Note $2,000.00 

Second payment and interest, New School 

loan, $3,665.00 

Street Lights— 222 @ $15.50, 3,441.00 



$11,606.00 

Article 5 — Highways. 

Ordinary repairs, highways and bridges, 3,000.00 

Article 6 — Necessary town expenses. 

Contingencies, $1,200.00 

Care Memorial Hall, 150,00 



Articles in the Town Warrant for 
Town Meeting, February 1, 1915 



Article 1 — To choose a Moderator to preside at 
said meeting. 

Article 2 — To choose all necessary town officers 
for the ensuing year: — Town Clerk; three Selectmen; 
one Assessor for three years; Town Treasurer; one 
School Committee for 3 years ; one Water Commission- 
er for three years ; one Sinking Fund Commissioner for 
three years; one Trustee Public Library for three 
years; Auditor; Tree Warden; Elector, under the will 
of Oliver Smith; Tax Collector; six Constables; and to 
vote on the questions — "Yes" or "No" — Shall Li- 
censes be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in 
this town? All the foregoing to be voted for on one 
ballot. 

The polls will be opened at ten o 'clock in the fore- 
noon, and be kept open at least four hours, and for as 
much longer time as a majority of the voters present 
shall direct, but in no case shall they be kept open after 
the hour of sunset. 



Article 3 — To hear the reports of the various 
town officers and act thereon. 

Article 4 — To receive and pass on town accounts. 

Article 5 — To take action in relation to mainten- 
ance and repairs of highways and bridges the ensuing 
year, and raise and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 6 — To take action in relation to raising 
money and appropriating same to defray the necessary 
expenses of the town for the ensuing year. 

Article 7 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Memorial Day. 

Article 8 — 'To take action in relation to support 
of the poor for the ensuing year, and raise and appro- 
priate money for the same. 

Article 9 — To revise and accept the list of Jurors 
reported by the Selectmen. 

Article 10 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for care of cemeteries for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 11 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the Public Library for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 12 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for Firemen's Muster. 



8 

Article 13 — To see if the town will vote to author- 
ize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money in anticipation of the revenue of the 
current financial year. 

Article 14 — 'To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for the employment of one or 
more School Physicians, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 502, Acts of 1906. 

Article 15 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for the payment of tuitions of Hat- 
field children attending the Smith Industrial School. 

Article 16 — To see if the town will vote to appoint 
a Finance Committee to act for the ensuing year. 

Article 17 — To see if the town will raise and ap- 
propriate money for purchasing supplies needed by the 
Fire Department. 

Article 18 — To see if the town will vote to oil the 
stone roads of the town the ensuing year, and raise 
and appropriate money for the same. 

Article 19 — »To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate money for the spraying of its trees 
and Tree "Warden work. 

Article 20 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $100 for 6 Street Lights to 
be placed on Elm street, from near the Larkin place 
west to Banks' corner. 



Article 21 — To see if the town will vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $5,000 for building perma- 
nent roads of stone and gravel on North Main, Chest- 
nut, North and Dwight Streets. $2,500 to be used in 
connection with $2,500 received from the State and 
placed on North Main street, $1,500 on Chestnut street, 
and $500 each on North and Dwight streets; said sum 
to be raised as recommended by your Finance Com- 
mittee. 

Article 22 — To see if the town will vote to build a 
permanent road of stone on North Main Street, under 
provision of Chapter 525, Acts of 191 0. 

Article 23 — To see if the town will vote that con- 
trol of the Silas Porter property in rear of the new 
school building be given to the School Committee, for 
school playground and athletic field purposes. 

Article 2 1 — To see what action the tcwa vvdll take 
in regard to grading around the new school building, 
and raise and appropriate money for same. 

Article 25 — To see if the town will vote to accept 
and adopt a set of By-Laws herewith submitted by the 
Selectmen. 



Selectmen's Report 



To the Citizens of Hatfield-. — 

Gentlemen: — In accordance with the requirements 
of the Statutes of Massachusetts, the following report 
for the year ending December 31st, 1914, is respectfully 
submitted : 



STATE AID 

Paid to three persons, $120.00 

POOR EXPENDITURES 

Aid — cash paid, 78.00 

Dickinson Hospital, 176.00 

City of Northampton, 295.85 

City of Holyoke, 172.81 

Town of Hadley, 70.93 

James L. Boyle, wood, 10.50 

Dr. F. W. Doyle, medical attendance, 46.50 

10 



11 

H. D. Smith, coal and ex. to Tewksbury, 60.73 



M. J. Ryan, supplies, 


54.16 


J. J. Curtis, repairs, 


1.40 


State Board of Charity, 


52.50 


Fred J. Morgan, 


30.00 


A. J. Bonneville, medical attendance, 


10.00 


Mrs. A. Parent, 


10.00 



$1,069.38 

INSPECTION OF ANIMALS AND BEEVES 

E. S. Warner, $349.60 

OLD BILLS— 1913. 

M. J. Ryan, supplies highways, $33.15 

F. Gr. Howard, supplies highways, 1.67 
W. P. Boyle, labor tool house, 9.25 
M. C. Bailey, lumber tool house, 108.18 
P. W. Mullins, storing hose wagon, and horse 7.00 
H. W. Marsh, storing hose wagon and use of 

horse, 9.00 

Fred Winzel, storing hose wagon, 5.00 

T. M. O'Dea, storing hose wagon, 5.00 

J. J. Betsold, storing hose wagon, 5.00 

L. J. Pelissier, Fish Warden, 5.00 

$188.25 



12 
STREET LIGHTS 

Amherst Gas Company, $3,616.56 

WATER RATES 

Superintendent, $500.00 

TOWN OFFICERS 

J. J. Betsold, services as Selectman, 1913, $150.00 

J. E. Porter, services as Selectman, 1913, 75.00 

M. W. Boyle, services as Selectman, 1913, 75.00 

C. K. Morton, services as Elector, 10.00 

D. W. Wells, services as Water Commissioner 10.00 
M. J. Proulx, services as Water Commissioner 10.00 
A. R. Breor, services as Water Commissioner, 10.00 
James L. Day, Auditor, 10.00 
P. W. Mullins, Assessor, 80.00 

E. W. Strong, Assessor, 65.00 
L. H. Kingsley, Assessor, 177.50 
E. L. Graves, Tax Collector, 1913, 206.00 
E. L. Graves, Sealer and Ballot Clerk, 67.00 
Thos. W. Ryan, . Registrar of Voters, 10.00 
Samuel F. Billings, Registrar of Voters, 10.00 
R. W. Weber, Registrar of Voters, 10.00 
L. H. Kingsley, Registrar of Voters, 10.00 
Charles I. Stowell, Ballot Clerk, 6.00 
Dennis E. Holley, Ballot Clerk, 4.00 
Robert J. McGrath, Ballot Clerk, 4.00 



13 

Scott Harris, Ballot Clerk, 6.00 

L. H. Kingsley, services as Town Clerk, 

Clerk Board of Selectmen, 500.00 

as Town Treasurer, 100.00 

George Eberlein, police duty, 5.00 



$1,610.50 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

J. J. Betsold, Storing hose wagon and use 

of horse, 6.00 
C. H. Crafts, storing hose wagon and use of 

horse, 32.00 

F. T. Bardwell, cash paid for forest fires, 124.00 

John McHugh, use of horse, 7.00 

S. W. Kingsley, repairs No. 6 hose wagon 5.50 
T. M. Dea, storing hose wagon and use of 

horse, 14.00 

Fred Winzel, storing hose wagon, 5.00 

H. W. Marsh, storing hose wagon, 5.00 

Mrs. James Mullins, storing hose wagon, 5.00 



SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 



$203.50 



Charles A. Byrne, $50.00 

A. J. Bonneville, 50.00 

$100.00 



14 

CLEANING OUT SCHOOL STREET DITCH 

D. P. Sheehan, Supt. $8.00 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 5.00 

Jacob Geis, 3.50 

George M. Franklin, 3.50 

Walenty Tos, 3.50 

Nine men, labor, 27.20 



CONTINGENCIES 



$50.70 



Herald Job Print, Town Reports and Bal- 
lots, $162.40 
M. J. Proulx, police dnty, 13.50 
Scott Harris, care clock and Town Hall, 35.50 
Archie P. Graves, slabs, 4.00 
O'Donnell & O'Donnell, law, 5.00 
E. L. Graves, postage reports, envelopes 

and stamps, 25.62 

C. H. Chase, deed transfers, 15.45 

M. G. Mullins, rep. electricity at Town Hall, 14.50 

H. H. Chilson, recording North st. petition 3.00 

National Blank Book Co., order book, 10.25 
Amherst Gas Company, electricity, Town 

Hall, 4J.15 

L. B. Waltz, police duty, 2.00 

W. & L. E. Gnrley, sealers' supplies, 3.04 

W. J. Collins, fumigating, 5.00 

Miller & Green, furniture polish, • 3.23 



15 

H. S. Gere & Sons, adv., 2.50 

J. J. Curtis, repairs Memorial Hall, 4.70 

C. H. Chase, rec. Gt. Ponset Eoad, 2.35 

Johnson's Bookstore, cash and coll book, 4.00 

C. T. Bagnall, tax bills, 2.60 

Fairbanks Co., labels, .69 

C. I. Stowell, care Wilkie plot, 3.00 
A. J. Bonneville, fumigating, returning 

births 30.25 

C. A. Byrne, fumigating, registering births, 44.25 

F. T. Bardwell, wood Town Hall, 18.00 
L. H. Kingsley, recording, indexing births, 

marriages and deaths, • 57.00 

Serving S. Warrants, 18.00 

Fares, te., ex. and postage paid 20.73 

Michael Dulaski, cement bounds, 18.00 

A. H. Beers, survey of ditch, 4.00 

J. J. Betsold, wood Memorial Hall, 13.00 

S. W. Kingsley, police duty, 29.10 

George A. Chandler, repairing «Town Hall, 27.00 

L, J. Pelissier, Fish Warden, 5.00 



$647.81 



TREE WARDEN AND SPRAYING 

P. J. Whalen, Tree Warden, labor, $76.50 

Merrimac Chemical Co., lead, 58.87 

Paul Favor, climber, 43.00 

George H. Newman, labor, 1.00 

S. W. Kingsley, labor and man paid, 82.03 



16 

H. D. Smith, team and man, 50.70 

J. A. Sullivan, supplies, 4.85 

D. P. Sheehan, elm tree, 25.75 

J. L. Sheehan, elm tree 13.25 

George M. Franklin, elm tree, 6.00 

Frank Smith, elm tree, 9.35 

Walenty Tos, qjm tree, 8.55 

Jacob Geis, elm tree, 6.00 

John Fusek, elm tree, 7.75 

John McHugh, elm tree, 3.00 

Jacob Jandriejski, elm tree, 1.75 

Wm. D. Smith, saw, 1.25 

L, J. Pelissier, painting front of house, 24.00 



$423.60 



CHESTNUT STREET STONE ROAD 



D. P. Sheehan, Supt. team and labor, $67.75 

H. D. Smith, team and labor, 24.38 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 38.50 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 43.00 

Wm. C. Kingsley, team and labor, 11.50 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 16.50 

P. W. Mullins, team and labor, 25.50 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 4.50 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 25.50 

Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 38.50 

James Millins, team and labor, 7.50 

John F. Day, team and labor, 12.00 

L. J. Casten, labor, 33.50 



17 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 25.00 

H. L. Pellam, labor, 12.35 

George M, Franklin, labor, 12.25 

Jacob Geis, labor, 12.10 

Peter Zagrodnek, labor, 15.05 

Walenty Tos, labor, 13.30 

Martin Bej, labor, 5.20 

Paul Harback, labor, 13.30 

John Dubil, labor, 15.05 

Andrew, labor, 15.05 

Frank Smith, labor, 13.30 

Mike Suriski, labor, 15.05 

Frank E. Wilkie, sand, 41.30 

J. S. Lane & Sons, stone, 473.52 

$1,030.45 



KING STREET WALK 

D. P. Sheehan, Supt., team and labor, $62.50 
H. Shumway, team and labor, 13.50 
H. D. Smith, team and labor, 54.00 

E. A. Eyan, team and labor, 14.87 
P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 40.50 
Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 7.00 
J. L. Proulx, team and labor, 9.00 
M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 4.50 
P. W. Mullins, team and labor, 18.00 
James L. Boyle, team and labor, 14.50 
J. L. Sheehan, labor, 25.00 
H. L. Pellam, labor, 17.49 



18 

George M. Franklin, labor, 21.87 

Jacob Geis, labor, 23.62 

Walenty Tos, labor, 11.37 

Paul Lieskoski, labor, 15.75 

L. J. Casten, labor, 10.00 

Peter Zagrodnek, labor, 4.37 

Steve Pazen, labor, .87 

Mike Sawka, labor, 1.75 

Nick Bykaccuski, labor, 2.62 

Alex Kusski, labor, 2.62 

Mike Superba, labor, 4.37 

M. J. Ryan, sand, 17.40 

L. H. Kingsley, sand, 2.10 

J. S. Lane & Son, dust, 73.81 



$473.38 

SEWERS— SOUTH STREET AND RAYMOND 

AVENUE 

D. P. Sheehan, Supt., team and labor, $111.60 

H. D. Smith, team and labor, 17.45 

M. W. t Boyle, team and labor, 2.00 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 4.75 

Wm. E. Boyle, team and labor, 2.00 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 6.50 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 35.00 

Jacob Geis, labor, 14.00 

George M. Franklin, labor, 24.50 

H. L. Pellam, labor, 22.00 



19 



Peter Zagrodnek, labor, 21.00 

Walenty Tos, labor, 21.00 

Wm. C. Kingsley, labor, 1.75 

Stanley Cork, labor, 4.50 

Anthony Marceski, labor 4.50 

Mike Gogle, labor, 5.25 

W. Gorosick, labor, 5.25 

Harry Denisker, labor, 4.18 

Mike Shanko, labor, 4.50 

Martin Bej, labor, 22.75 

Paul Harback, labor, 17.50 

Andrew , labor, 5.25 

John Dubil, labor, 21.00 

Frank Smith, labor, 22.75 

John Fusek, labor, 15.75 

Mike Suriski, labor, 14.00 

L. J. Casten, labor, 3.50 

Andrew Kavakulski, labor, 15.75 

Stanley Baran, labor, 11.20 

Martin Baran, labor, 13.50 

Mike Lata, labor, 10.50 

Anthony Bereski, labor, 12.00 

Panl Wirgeliewcz, labor, 6.25 

William Nessa, labor, 4.35 

George Budzjn, labor, 2.00 

Frank E. Wilkie, sand, 1.80 

Northampton Iron Works, catch basins, 22.00 

Howes Brick Co., brick, 11.25 

B. & M. E. E. freight on tile, 158.58 

D. W. Lewis Co., tile, 435.71 

W. H. Eiley & Co., tile, 312.76 



20 

M. D. Patteson, grades, 5.50 



$1,457.38 



OILING STONE EOADS 

American Car Sprinkler Co., $772.95 

F. M. Cook & Son, 219.99 



$992.94 



MEMORIAL DAY 
C. K. Morton, $75.00 

CARE OF CEMETERIES 
F. H. Bardwell, $100.00 

SMITH AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL 
Tuition, $555.54 

HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES' ORDINARY REPAIRS 



D. P. Sheehan, Supt., team and labor, $603.25 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 332.50 

C. H. Crafts, team and labor, 11.70 

F. iT. Bardwell, team and labor, 10.50 

M. C. Strong, team and labor, 2.25 

John F. Day, team and labor, 104.65 



21 

M. H. Dwight, team and labor, 7.00 

D. W. Wells, team and labor, 5.00 

J. B. Vollinger, team and labor, 13.50 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 60.00 

J. C. Ryan, team and labor, 61.00 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 58.50 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 90.34 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 214.00 

Wm. W. Gore, team and labor, 6.50 

John J. Stenglein, team and labor, 4.50 

Chas. E. Pieffer, team and labor, 4.50 

John L. Boyle, team and labor, 6.00 

P. W. Mullins, team and labor, 35.00 

H. D. Smith, coal, team and labor, 64.40 

J. L. Proulx, team and labor, 18.00 

A. J. Breor, team and labor, 7.00 

F. G. Vollinger, team and labor, 12.00 

Archie P. Graves, team and labor, 13.50 

George P. Graves, labor, 2.62 

George L. Graves, labor, 1.00 

John J. Steele, labor, 3.50 

John L. Sheehan, labor, 174.75 

Paul Cernek, labor, 21.75 

Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 112.85 

George Budzjn, labor, 8.00 

John Fusek, labor, 15.75 

H. L. Pellam, labor, 34.13 

Stanley Waskiewiecz, labor, 6.25 

L. J. Casten, labor, 67.50 

Paul Lieuskoski, labor, 34.25 

Jacob Geis, labor, 111.85 



22 



Walenty Tos, labor, 35.35 

Peter Zagrodnek, labor, 7.65 

Zigmunt Kugler, labor, 1.75 

E. A. Ryan, labor, 3.50 
Mike Superba, labor, 3.50 
Paul Harback, labor, 5.25 
Mike Suriski, labor, 3.50 
Martin Bej, labor, 5.25 
Joseph Keyn, labor, 5.25 
John Dubil, labor, 5.25 
Andrew — , labor, 5.25 

F. L. Betsold, labor, 1.75 
Mike Salft, labor, 1.75 
George Martella, labor,; 5.25 

George , labor, 1.75 

Stanley , labor, 1.75 

Wm. C. Dalton, stone bounds, 14.00 

M. J. Proulx, sand, 3.10 

A. W. Morton, sand, 1.75 
Wm. H. Dickinson, sand, 10.00 

G. B. McClellan, sand, .60 
H. E. Bardwell, sand, 1.20 
L. H. Kingsley, sand, 33.10 

B. & M. Railroad, freight, 3.99 
W. H. Riley & Co. 28.50 
M. J. Ryan, supplies, 15.08 

C. I. Stowell, common, 29.50 
Jas. P. Kelley, common, 10.50 
Chase & Coolidge, oil, 6.60 
Est. A. L. Strong, plank, 124.98 
Wm. P. Boyle, paint, 4.00 



23 



J. J. Curtis, plumb. 


10.97 


Bradford Lumber Co., lumber, 


175.77 


George Eberlein, work, 


32.18 


Buffalo Steam Boiler Co., rep. 


10.52 


City Northampton, stone, 


29.64 


Standard Mfg. Co., kettle, 


66.67 


C. E. Herrick, repairs, 


1.50 


New England Road Mchy. Co., blade, 


8.50 


Foster-Farrar Co., supplies, 


17.00 


S. W. Kingsley, work, 


.45 


J. S. Lane & Sons, stone, 


228.40 


N. E. Metal Culvert Co., 


122.76 


Gulf Refining Co., oil, 


38.25 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



$3,463.05 



F. G. Howard, team, 6.25 

H. R. Huntting Co., books, 91.16 

H. Warren, knobs, 2.30 

Mrs. Buczak, cleaning, 1.40 

M. G. Mullins, rep. electric lights, 3.85 

Johnson 's Bookstore, books, 8.52 

The Survey, 3.00 

Perry Mason Co. 2.00 

Old bill, (1913), 6.00 

C. W. Whiting, rack, 5.50 

C. A. Graves, book, 1.50 

Underwood & Underwood, pictures, 18.86 

C. M. Barton, librarian, 136.34 



24 



Margaret A. Eyan, asst., 


19.50 


Dorothy A. Lynch, asst., 


13.50 


I. A. Flint, cash, ex., 


.25 


Bridgman & Lyman, books, 


30.07 



BONDS— TOWN OFFICERS 



$350.00 



H. L. Howard, bond Treasurer, 


32.00 


H. L. Howard, bond Coll. 


25.00 




$57.00 


INSUEANCE 




H. L. Howard, 


$104.00 



BEADSTEEET STONE EOAD 

D. P. Sheehan, Supt., team and labor, $233.22 

Dennis Whalen, team and labor, 139.50 

H. Shumway, team and labor, 135.00 

Archie P. Graves, team and labor, 146.00 

H. D. Smith, coal, team and labor, 130.24 

P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 152.00 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 107.50 

H. E. Bardwell, team and labor, 108.00 

John C. Eyan, team and labor, 81.00 

F. T. Bardwell, team and labor, 141.50 



25 



James L. Boyle, team and labor, 36.00 

M. W. Boyle, team and labor, 43.00 

C. H. Crafts, sand, team and labor, 80.65 

Sarah Brennan, sand, 46.95 

J. L. Sheehan, labor, 102.50 

H. L. Pellam, labor, 64.00 

Jacob Geis, labor, 63.00 

L. J. Casten, labor, 159.50 

Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 63.00 

Walenty Tos, labor, 49.00 

Steve Pazen, labor, 3.50 

Mike Sureski, labor, 57.00 

Frank Farusro, labor, 49.05 

John Fishman, labor, 7.38 

Andrew Kechel, labor, 8.75 

Joe Koosie, labor, 12.25 

Frank Smith, labor, 68.25 

Mike Salft, labor, 22.75 

Peter Zagrodnek, labor, 59.50 

Paul Harback, labor, 45.50 

Martin Bej, labor, 49.00 

Joe Keyn, labor, 40.25 

John Dubil, labor, 42.00 

Felix Kugler, labor, 36.55 

George Martella, labor, 38.50 

Paul Lieskoski, labor, 3.50 

Andrew , labor, 15.75 

George , labor, 7.00 

Stanley , labor, 7.00 

J. K. Holt, care of lantern, 5.00 

N. E. Metal Culvert Co., 20.16 



26 

G. H. Danf orth, oil, .60 

B. & M. Eailroad, ft., and demurrage, 15.00 

J. S. Lane & Son, stone, 2,898.28 



$5,594.08 

CAEE MEMORIAL HALL 

Helen Buczak, cleaning, $2.70 

H. D. Smith, coal, 64.29 

L. H. Kingsley, janitor, 75.00 



$141.99 



STEAM ROLLER AT HADLEY 

L. J. Casten, labor, 39.00 

H. D. Smith, coal, 2.75 



$41.75 
Received from Kiely & Gleason, $166.75 

GRADING GROUNDS— NEW SCHOOL BUILDING 

D. P. Sheehan, Supt., team and labor, 69.00 

H. E. Bardwell, team and labor, sand, 30.56 

H. D. Smith, team and labor, 40.50 

James L. Boyle, team and labor, 13.50 

H. Shnmway, team and labor, 4.50 

Wm. H. Dickinson, team and labor, 26.00 



27 

M. J. Proulx, team and labor, 
Ernest Godin, team and labor, 
John C. Ryan, team and labor, 
John F. Dea, team and labor, 
P. T. Boyle, team and labor, 
J. L. Sheehan, labor, 
Geo. M. Franklin, labor, 
Chas. Filipek, labor, 
Frank Smith, labor, 
Chas. Wagner, labor, 
H. L. Pellam, labor, 
Walenty Tos, labor, 
Jacob Geis, labor, 
John Fusek, labor, 
Paul Gorozoski, labor, 
Kaietan Backiel, labor, 
Joseph Maletska, labor, 
George Paschek, labor, 
Bylij Wononacz, labor, 
Jacob Jandriezki, labor, 
Tony Smoski, labor, 
Tony Skineski, labor, 
Stanley Burk, labor, 



27.00 

22.50 

30.50 

40.50 

18.00 

25.00 

12.25 

10.50 

15.75 

12.25 

10.50 

12.25 

14.00 

10.50 

7.50 

16.25 

10.50 

9.75 

7.50 

1.75 

1.25 

1.25 

1.25 



$502.56 



TUITION— SMITH ACADEMY 



David Billings, Treasurer, 



$500.00 



28 

EXPENSES HADLEY MUSTER 

M. J. Eyan, Fire Chief, $37.10 

SCHOOL EXPENDITURES 

Clinton J. Richards, services as Supt. $561.18 

Clinton J. Richards, sundries, 26.71 

Mary L. Allaire, services as Principal, 285.00 

Margaret A. Ryan, teaching, 336.00 

Constance C. Breor, teaching, 330.00 

Helen F. Riley, teaching, 312.00 

Mary Flaherty, teaching, 22.00 

Marguerite A. Flaherty, teaching, 156.00 

Pearl N. Sadd, teaching, 139.20 

Gladys L. Rice, teaching, 324.00 

Marian C. vBillings, teaching, 20.20 

Margaret B. Sazama, teaching, 120.00 

Margaret B. Sazama, material, 3.01 

Lena H. Proulx, teaching, 285.00 

Nellie T. O'Brien, teaching, 324.00 

Christine Hibbard, teaching, 324.00 

Gladys V. Rand, teaching, 324.00 

Venice A. Hough, teaching, 130.00 

Sarah V. Kiley, teaching, 161.00 

Margaret Woods, teaching, 172.80 

Gladys Jenney, teaching, 180.00 

Mary C. Leary, teaching, 165.00 

Marguerite M. McGrath, teaching, 135.00 

Doris J. Rand, teaching, 135.00 

Mrs. T. Graves, teaching, 24.00 



29 

Maude E. Boyle, music, 150.00 

Anna L. Kilmurry, writing, 46.00 

Asenath H. Landers, drawing, 35.00 

Mass. (Teachers ' Retirement Board, pensions, 96.00 

Scott Harris, janitor, 177.00 

James P. Kelly, janitor, 130.75 

Mrs. Joseph Liebl, janitor, 67.25 

Kate Flynn, janitor, 91.60 

John Salvas, janitor, 88.50 

Geo. B. Steele, labor, 4.00 

Jurko Wolosyn, labor, 2.00 

F. Gr. Howard, sup. • 4.21 

William Fox, labor, 5.25 

Mrs. Merrick, cleaning, 3.00 

Wm. S. Murphy, loam, 4.00 

0. Belden & Sons, labor, 10.00 

Conn. Valley St. Ey. Co., tickets, 120.00 

John M. Strong, trans. 5.00 

F. T. Bardwell, trans, and wood, 11.75 

H. D. Smith, coal and labor, 933.82 

Phelps & Gare, clocks, 9.50 

Shumway &Riley, repairs, 11.70 

E. J. McCarthy, repairs, 1.30 

J. J. Curtis, repairs, 99.87 

S. W. Kingsley, repairs, 4.35 

Wm. P. Boyle, repairs and ptg., 339.40 

Merrick Lumber Co., material, 70.94 

M. Steinert Sons Co., victrola, 40.00 

Benj. Sanborn & Co. books, 28.45 

J. L. Hammett Co, books, 176,06 

Silver Burdett Co, books, 19.64 



30 

E. E. |Babb & Co., books, 259.53 
D. C. Heath & Co., books, 14.13 
Ginn & Co., books, 117.03 
American Book Co., books, 17.84 
A. N. Palmer Co., books, 85.55 
Holden Patent Book Cover Co. 4.35 
Milton Bradley Co. supplies, 1.50 
James M. Pierce, supplies, 12.88 
Foster-Farrar Co., supplies, 3.10 
A. S. Barnes Co., supplies, 3.07 

F. M. Crittenden, ptg., 13.93 
Educational Press Co., magazines, 7.20 
Northfield Press, 2.90 
Chas. Scribner's Sons, books, 63.95 
Chas. E. Merrill Co., books, 24.89 

G. & C. Merriam Co., books, 42.00 
D. Appleton Co., books, 21.00 
C. W. Whiting, box, 1.25 

A. E. Breor, salary, School Com. 25.00 

School Census, 18.00 

Labor, tel. and ex. paid, 40.40 

John F. O'Dea, salary, School Com. 20.00 

Janitor, labor and ex. paid, 107.67 

Cash advanced Am. Seat Co. 40.00 

Thaddeus Graves, salary, School Com. 15.00 

Labor, etc., 8.75 

L. E. Warner, electric wiring, 67.50 

B. & M. Eailroad, ft. on seats, 51.60 
American Seating Co., seats, 1,098.79 

$9,970.25 



31 




NEW SCHOOL BUILDING 


Cash received from all sources, 




Cash paid A. D. McCormick, 


$32,116.31 


Karl S. Putnam, 


1,500.00 


Insurance, 


134.75 


Advertising 


3.00 


Stone-Underhill Heating Co. 


1,380.00 


Balance unexpended this acct., 


11,142.94 



$46,277.00 



$46,277.00 
RECAPITULATION OF ORDERS DRAWN 



State Aid, 


120.00 


Poor Expenditures, 


1,069.38 


Town Officers, 


1,610.50 


Water Rates. 


500.00 


Schools, 


9,970.25 


School Physicians, 


100.00 


Contingencies, 


647.81 


Fire Department, 


203.50 


Inspection of Animals-carcasses, 


349.60 


Old Bills, 


188.25 


Street Lights, 


3,616.56 


Spraying and trimming trees, 


423.60 


Bonds — Town Officers, 


57.00 


Public Library, 


350.00 


Insurance, 


104.00 


Highways and Bridges, 


3,463.05 


New School Building, 


35,134.06 



32 



Care Memorial Hall, 


141.99 


King Street Walk, 


473.38 


Memorial Day, 


75.00 


Bradstreet Depot Stone Road, 


5,594.08 


Sewers — South St. and Raymond Ave. 


1,457.38 


Chestnut Street Stone Road, 


1,030.45 


Smith Agl. School — Tuition, 


555.54 


Oiling Stone Roads, 


992.94 


Hadley Muster, 


37.10 


School Street Ditch, 


50.70 


Smith Academy — Tuition, 


500.00 


Care Cemeteries, 


100.00 


Steam Roller at Hadley, 


41.75 


New School Building — grading, 


502.56 


$69,460.43 


Respectfully submitted 




M. W. BOYLE, 




H. D. SMITH, 




J. J. BETSOLD 


r 


Selectmen. 



I have this day examined the books of the Select- 
men and find them correct. 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 
Hatfield, January 7th, 1915, 



33 
LIST OF APPROPRIATIONS VOTED TO BE RAIS- 
ED AT THE ANNUAL TOWN MEET- 
ING' HELD MARCH 16th, 1914 



$ 1,000 for 


Contingencies. 


200 


y y 


Contingencies — additional. 


500 


y y 


Water Rates. 


1,500 


1 y 


Salaries — Town Officers. 


1,000 


>> 


Poor. 


800 


y y 


Interest. 


9,350 


y y 


Schools — maintenance of — and Dog Fund 


3,000 


1 y 


Highways and Bridges and for tools to 
repair stone roads. 


400 


y y 


Chestnnt Street Drain. 


500 


y i 


Tuition — Smith Academy, 


600 


y y 


Sidewalk North side King Street. 


500 


y y 


Hose Tower and Supplies for Fire Dept. 


500 


y y 


Tree Warden work and Spraying Trees. 


150 


y •> 


Care of Memorial Hall. 


60 


1 1 


Bonds — Town Officers. 


110 


i y 


Insurance. 


300 


y y 


Inspection of Animals, beeves and car- 
casses. 


75 


yy 


Memorial Day. 


100 


y y 


Care of Cemeteries, under supervision of 
V. I. Society. 


35Q 


y j 


Public Library. 


75 


y y 


Muster Day. 


100 


y y 


School Physicians. 


300 


y y 


Tuition — Smith Industrial School. 



34 

350 " Oiling Stone Roads. 
2,500 " Bradstreet Eoad Note, due Aug. 1st, 1914. 
2,100 " Bradstreet Box Culvert Note, due Oct. 29, 

1914. 
1,100 " Street Lights, to July 1st, 1914. 
2,900 " First Payment and Interest — New School 
Building. 
600 " Finishing Bradstreet Stone Eoad. 
1,720.50 " Six months Street Lights, 
$32,740.50 Total sum to be assessed on the polls and 
estates, 1914. 

LIST OF JURORS SUBMITTED BY THE SELECT- 
MEN OF THE TOWN OF HATFIELD— 1915 



Name 
Bardwell, Frederick T. 
Bardwell, James S. 
Bardwell, Arthur C. 
Belden, Oscar E. 
Betsold, Frank L. 
Billings, Louis A. 
Bitner, John B. 
Boyle, William E. 
Boyle, George A. 
Carl, Henry W. 
Cutter, William R. 
Dickinson, Edward N. 
Fitzgerald, David L. 
Fitzgerald, (Thomas J. 



Occupation 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 
Farmer 



35 



Lovett, Charles E. 
McGrath, 2d, Eobert J. 
Mullins, James 
Murphy, William S. ' 
O'Dea, Thomas M. 
Ryan, John C. 
Ryan, Matthew J. 
Sheehan, Daniel P. 
Slattery, Charles F. 
Smith, Adam J. 
Wade, Charles W. 
Weber, Rudolph W. 
Wells, Reuben F. 
Wight, LelandH. 



Mechanic 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Merchant 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 

Farmer 



Treasurer's Report 



L. H. Kingsley, Treasurer, in Account with the 
Town of Hatfield. 



Dr. 



To balance in Treasury, 45.13 

To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, Coll (1913) 4,473.26 
To cash rec'd from E. L. Graves, Coll. (1914) 27,385.15 

Treas. Water Commissioners' 2,900.00 

District Court fines, 80.10 

Slaughter Licenses, 7.00 

Auctioneer License, 1.00 

Sealer's Eeceipts, 61.23 

Rent of Town Hall, 61.00 

Sheriff Fitzgerald, fines, 6.00 

James Porter, plowing out road, 2.00 

Town of Whately, use of S. Boiler, 187.50 

Kiely & Gleason, use of S. Boiler, 166.75 

A. B. Breor, tickets sold, 76.50 

C. J. Bichards, sup. sold, 3.50 

Proceeds from concert, for victrola, 27.25 

36 



37 

Silas Porter Fund' grading school gnds., 502.56 

City of Boston, 13.00 

State— School Supt, 500.00 

Corporation Tax, 135.30 

National Bank (Tax, 682.46 

State Aid, 120.00 

Support of sick paupers, 51.00 

Trans, of sick paupers, 8.55 

Tuition of Smith School, 50.00 

Inspection of Animals, 46.00 

Hugh McLeod, cemetery plot, .50 

P. T. Boyle, sewer entrance, 33.00 

H. D. Smith, sale of stone, 19.94 

J. E. Porter, sewer entrance, 66.00 

Joseph Wisaway' sewer entrance and tile,, 41.00 

James M. Kiley, sewer entrance and tile, 93.00 

Nicholas Staszko, sewer entrance and tile, 38.55 

John Yarrows, sewer entrance and tile, 39.30 

Frank Zargrodnek, sewer entrance, 33.00 

M. Crawford, tile, .50 

D. L. Fitzgerald, sewer entrance, 33.00 

H. W. Carl, S. entrance and tile, 46.85 

G. A. Billings, S. entrance and tile, 39.30 

Michael Lata, S. entrance, 33.00 

Ernest Godin, S entrance, 66.00 

Anthony Novack, S. entrance and tile, 43.50 

Melchoir Kulesza, S. entrance and tile, 44.40 

John McHugh, tile, 7.14 

Frank Kugler, entrance and tile, 38.50 

Wm. E. Boyle, tile, 69.30 

George Saffer, entrance, 33.00 



38 

C. L. Warner, entrance, 33.00 

Geo. Eberlein, tile, plank, rent of land, 9.90 

Wm. H. Dickinson, cleaning ditch, 24.20 

John J. O'Malley, cleaning ditch, 5.00 

Anthony Popka> S. entrance and tile, 43.68 

Clara L. Dickinson, entrance, 33.00 

C. A. Byrne, work on drain, 10.00 

H. E. Bardwell, sale of shovel, 1.25 

To cash rec 'd from Temporary and long 
time loans. 

Northampton Institution for Sav- 
ings, $12,000.00 
Northampton Institution for Sav- 
ings, 5,000.00 
C. D. Parker & Co. 6,002.50 
First National Bank, 15,000.00 
Perry, Coffin & Burr, 40,000.00 
Premium on above, 2,277.00 
Contributed, 4>000.00 



$84,279.50 
$122,850.55 



Cr. 



By cash paid Selectmen's orders, $69,460.43 

Interest on water bonds, 1,000.00 

District Court fines, 66.41 

Bureau of Statistics, 52.00 

Am. Bank Note Co. ptg. coupons, 20.00 



39 



Interest on temporary loans, 


828.04 


State Cor. Tax, 


1.68 


State National Bank Tax, 


49.14 


County Tax, 


2,881.38 


State Tax, 


3,500.00 


State Repairs Highways, 


250.75 


(Treasurer Sinking Fund, 


861.67 


Balance in Treasury, 


5>379.05 


By cash paid Temporary Notes, 




Northampton Institution for Savings, 


4,000.00 


Northampton Institution for Savings, 


12,000.00 


First National Bank, Bradstreet Note, 


2,500.00 


First National Bank, 


15,000.00 


First National Bank, box culvert Note, 


2,100.00 


First Note and Interest — Schoolhouse Loan, 


2,900.00 



$122,850.55 

IN ACCOUNT WITH E. L. GRAVES, COLLECTOR 

(1913 Taxes) 

Dr. 

To cash received, $4,473.26 

Assessors' orders of Abmts, 46.00 

$4,519.26 



40 




Cr. 




By uncollected taxes, 


$4,412.43 


Interest collected, 


84.83 


Addition to Warrant, 


22.00 


(1914 Taxes) 


i 


Dr. 




To cash received, 


$27,385.15 


Uncollected taxes, 


11,881.54 


Discount on taxes, 


629.34 


Assessors ' orders of Abmts, 


53.20 



Cr. 



By Assessors ' Warrant, 
Addition to Warrant, 
Interest collected, 



$38,948.47 

993.61 

7.15 



$4,519.26 



$39,949.23 



$39,949.23 



I have examined the accounts of the Tax Collector 
and find that he has been credited by the Treasurer 
with the amount of $4,473.26 of the taxes of 1913; and 
$27,385.15 of the taxes of 1914. 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 
Hatfield, January 7th, 1915. 



41 

WATEK SINKING FUND 

To thirty years four per cent. Water Bonds, $50,000.00 
By Sinking Fund, $22,089.50 

SUMMAEY OF TOWN ACCOUNT 

Dr. 

To outstanding Note, due May 15, 1915, $5,000.00 

New school building fund, 11,142.94 

From Water Comsrs., due to be paid Jan. 1, 

1915 1,000.00 

Bills due— not paid, 300.00 



$17,442.94 
Cr. 



By uncollected taxes, 


$11,881.54 


Due from State Aid, 


120.00 


State — Smith School, 


277.77 


Sewer Assessments, 


635.41 


Balance in Treasury, 


5,379.05 




$18,293.77 


Balance in favor of town, 


$850.83 



L. H. KINGSLEY- Treasurer. 



42 

I have examined the books and accounts of the 
Treasurer of the town of Hatfield, for the year ending 
Dec. 31st, 1914, and find them correct, I find Select- 
men's orders on file to the amount of sixty-nine thou- 
sand, four hundred sixty dollars and forty-three cents, 
($69,460.43) with evidence of their payment by him; 
Also, cancelled notes and receipts for State and County 
taxes, and interest paid. 

I f ind a balance in the Treasury of five thousand, 
three hundred seventy-nine dollars, and five cents » 
($5,379.05). 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 
Hatfield, January 7th, 1915. 



Report of Sinking Fund Commissioners 



We have the following amounts to the credit of the 
Sinking Fund: 

Northampton Institution for Savings, $1,406.14 

Nonotuck Savings Bank, 1,310.58 

Florence Savings Bank, 1,243.42 

Springfield Institution for Savings, 1,050.88 

Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank 1,054.63 

Haydenville Savings Bank, 339.80 

Easthampton Savings Bank, 387.47 

Union Trust Co. Springfield, 2,296.58 

N. Y., N. H. & H., E. E. Co. Bonds, 2,000.00 

Boston & Maine' E. E. Co., Bonds, 3,000.00 

Springfield Street Eailway Co., Bonds, 1,000.00 

Town of Hatfield Water Bonds, 7,000.00 



$22,089.50 



M. J. EYAN, 

E. S. WAENEE, 

JOHN McHUGH, 

Sinking Fund Commisisoners. 

I have this day examined the voucher of the Sink- 
ing Fund Commissioners and found them as reported. 

JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 
Hatfield, January 6, 1915. 



Water Commissioners Report 



The following is respectfully submitted as the nine- 
teenth annual report of the Board of Water Commis- 
sioners. 

We have received the past year as follows : 

Balance of cash from last year's acct.,$ 811.76 
Archie P. Graves, for fallen trees, 13.11 

Cash from collection of water rates, 4,845.34 
Contractors on school house, water 

and tapping, 32.25 



$5,702.46 



We have paid the past year as follows : 

Town of Hatfield, from water rates $2,900.00 
Chas. Miller & Son Co.' water pipe 

and specials, 665.77 

H. W. Wolfram, laying water pipe, 240.00 

W. H. Riley & Co., labor, lead and sup. 172.31 
Norwood Engineering Co., hydrants 

and gates, 276.28 

Boston & Maine R. R., freight, 23.09 

S. W. Kingsley, labor, cash pd. 1913, 23.35 

H. S. Gere & Sons, adv. for bids, 2.63 

Gazette Printing Co., order books, 2.00 

44 



45 

M. J. Proulx, labor and cash paid, 18.00 
N'h'ton W. W v tapping main, etc.' 142.05 
Edson W. Strong, labor and cash pd., 138.80 
Edson W. Strong, coll. of water rates, 145.35 
S. W. Kingsley, labor, cash pd. 1914., 18.75 
Balance, cash on deposit First Na- 
tional Bank of No. H. 934.08 



$5,702.46 

iThe total cost of the water works to January 1. 
1915, is $62,495.11. We have replaced the one-inch 
pipe on the Straits Road with 1932 feet of four-inch 
pipe at a cost of $1,091.97. 

There are now 425 connections with private pro- 
perty, 106 fire hydrants, 5 water tanks, and water in 6 
school houses and in Memorial Hall. 

There are now 18,781 feet of 8 inch pipe 



49,680 " 


" 6 » 


37,138 » 


" 4 " » 


1,757 " 


" 2 " 


8,726 » 


" 1 " 


1,070 " 


i, 3/ 4 » M 


117,152 feet 





Total 

M. J. PROULX' 

DANIEL W. WELLS, 

CHAS. W. WADE, 

Hatfield Water Commissioners. 
Hatfield, Mass., January 1, 1915. 



46 

I have this day examined the books and accounts 
of the Treasurer of the Water Commissioners of the 
Town of Hatfield and find them correct with vouchers 
on file for all payments made. 

(Signed) JAMES L. DAY, Auditor. 

Hatfield, Mass., January 6, 1915. 



List of Books and Magazines Added to the 
Library Since March 1914 



FICTION 



Pendro 

Bedesman 

Sweetapple Cove 

Thirty more Famous Stories 

Jim Davis 

Through the Farm Yard Gate 

Fifty Famous Stories Retold 

Captain Corageous 

Chance 

Eyes of the World 

Victim 

Battle Cry 

Twenty-Fourth of July 

Where Rolls the Oregon 

Auction Block 

Saturday's Child 

Hidden Children 

Clark's Field 

Gideon's Band 

How it Happened 

Ranch at the Wolverine 

Encounter 



Booth Tarkington 

Mary J. H. Skrine 

George Van Schaick 

James Baldwin 

John Masefield 

Emile Poulson 

James Baldwin 

Rudyard Kipling 

Joseph Conrad 

Harold Bell Wright 

Thomas Dixon 

Charles Neville Buck 

G. S. Richmond 

Dallas Lore Sharp 

Rex Beach 

Kathleen Norris 

Robert W. Chambers 

Robert Her rick 

George W. Cable 

Kate Langley Bosher 

B. W. Bower 

Annie Douglas Sedgwick 



47 



48 



Poet 

Ashton Kirk Special Detective 

Things that Count 

Rise of Jennie Cushing 

Love Insurance 

Guy Garrick 

Kent Knowles Quahaug 

Susan Grows Up 

Phyllis 

Patrol of the Sundance Trail 

Witch 

When Max Came Home 

Martha and Cupid 

Dans of the Old Pueblo 

Sound of Water 

Honorable Percivil 

Hands of Esau 

Teeth of the Tiger 

New Clarion 

Brentons 

Perch of the Devil 

Customs of the Country 

Blister Jones 

Janice Day 

Sylvia's Experiment 

Amateur Garden 

Misadventures of Joseph 

Maid Melicent 

Little Eva Edgerton 

Anne of the Blossom Shop 

Vanishing Messenger 

Adventures in Contentment 

The Slowcoach 

*n the Grip of the Wild Wa 

Christmas Eve on Lonesome 

The Wife of Sir Isaac Harman 



Meridith Nicholson 

Mr. Mclntyre 

Lawrence Eyre 

Mary S. Watts 

Earl Derr Biggers 

Arthur B. Reeve 

Joseph C. Lincoln 

Mary T. Leonard 

Maria Thompson Davies 

Ralph Connor 

Mary Johnston 

Edna A. Brown 

Julie M. Lippmann 

Percivil J. Covney 

Margarita S. Gerry 

Alice Hegan Rice 

Margaret Deland 

Maurice LeBlanc 

Will N. Harben 

Anna Chapin Ray 

Gertrude Atherton 

Edith Wharton 

John Tainter Fooie 

Helen Beecher Long 

Margaret R. Piper 

George W. Cable 

J. J. Bell 

Beulah Marie Dix 

Eleanor Hallowell Abbott 

Isa May Mullins 

E. Philips Oppenheim 

David Grayson 

Edward V. Lucus 

G. E. Mitton 

John Fox Jr. 

H. G. Wells 



49 



The Witness for the Defence 

Quaint Old Stories 

Stephen, a story of the Crusaders 

Looking After Sandy 

The Letter of Contract 

The Lights are Bright 

The Way of the Strong 

Delia Blanchflower 

The Pastor's Wife 

The Woman in the Alcove 

Hans Brinker 

Soldier of the Legion 

The Oldest of Four 

The Moose 

The Raft 

Innocent 

The Life story of a Fowl 

The Wall of Partition 

The Soddy 

Cy Whittiker's Place 

The Golden Barrier 

The Old Diller Place 

The Secret Garden 

Adventures in Friendship 

The Joy Bringer 



A. E. W. Mason 

Marion F. Lansing 

Eva A. Madden 

Margaret Turnbull 

Basil King 

Louise Kennedy 

Ridgwell Cullum 

Mrs. Humphrey Ward 

Jannette Le© 

Mary Mapes Dodge 

0. A. and A. M. Williamson 

Amy B. Marlow 

Agnes Herbert 

Coningsby Dawson 

Marie Corelli 

J. W. Hum 

Florence L. Barclay 

Sarah Comstock 

Joseph C. Lincoln 

Agnes and Egerton Castle 

Winfield Kirkland 

Frances Hodgson Burnett 

David Grayson 

Grace M. Cooke 



BOY'S BOOKS 



Boy's Life of Abraham Lincoln 

Johnny Blossom 

Boy Captive of Old Deerfield 

Young Farmer 

Book of Woodcraft 

Boy's Book of Inventions 

Boy Scouts on Lost Trail 



Helen Nicolay 

Dikken Zwilgmeyer 

Mary P. Wells Smith 

George B. Hill 

Ernest Thompson Seton 

Harry E. Maule 

Thornton W. Burgess 



50 



Ned Brewster's Caribou Hunt 

Wild Kindred of Fur, Feather and Fin 

My Life as an Indian 

Grannis of the Fifth 

Shelthers, Shacks and Shanties 

Heroes of Far North and Far South 

Ned Brewster's Year in the Big Woods 

The Boy Mechanic 

The Substitute 

Washington's Young Aids 

Camp of Cornwallis 

Soldier of the Wilderness 

The Boy Mechanic 

Two Little Savages 

heroes of all Times 

A Soldier of the Wilderness 

Rolf in the Woods 

The Wolf Hunters 

More than Conquorers 

Heroes of the Polar Seas 

Uncle David's Boys 



Chauncey J. Hawkins 

Jean M. Thompson 

J. W. Schultz 

Stanwood A. Pier 

D. C. Beard 

J. K. McLean 

Chauncey J. Hawkins 

Walter Camp 



Everett T. Tomllnson 

Ernest Thompson Seton 

Jeanne D'Arfl 

Everett L. Tomlinson 

Ernest Thompson Seton 

James O. Curwood 

Anadne Gilbert 

J. Kennedy McLean 

Edna A. Brown 



GIRL'S BOOKS 



The Christmas Makers Club 
The Little Miss Nobody 
The Girl from Sunset Ranch 
The Girls of Hill-Crest Farm 
Jeanne D'Arc 



Edith A. Sawyer 

Amy Bell Marlowe 

Amy Bell Marlowe 

Amy Bell Marlowe 

E. M. Wilmot 



CHILDREN'S BOOKS 



The Little Crusaders 
Rock Frog 
Master Frisky 



Eva A. Madden 

Harriet A. Cheever 

Clarence Hawkes 



51 



How the Indian Suit Ran Away 

Child's Garden of Verses 

Doctor Robin 

Lady Spider 

The Little Giant's Neighbors 

Adventures of a Brownie 

The Wreck of the Nursery Flyer 

The Adventures of Mr. Mocker 

Quaint Old Stories 

The Curly Haired Hen 

Something to Act 

Little Verses for Little Polks 

Tale of Peter Rabbit 

Real Fairy Folk 

Wild Flowers Every Child Should Know 

Days and Deeds (Prose) 

Days and Deeds (Poems) 

Mother Goose Songs 

Beasts and Birds 

Childhood Songs of Long Ago 

More Mother Goose Songs 

Our Dumb Animals 

Hood Stories for Great Holidays 

Songs Every Child Should Know 

Pictures Every Child Should Know 

The Book of Christmas 

Li'l Verses for Li'l Folks 

Just So Stories 

Folklore Stories 

House of the Heart and Other Plays 

Old Mother West-Wind 

St. Nicholas Book of Plays and Operettas 

True Tales of Birds and Beasts 

Hiawathas Primer 

Poems Every Child Should Know' 

Little Folks of Many Lands 



Mary Harrick Bird 

R. L. Stevenson 

Harriet A. Cheever 

Harriet A. Cheever 

Frances M. Fox 

Miss. Mulock 

Mary Herrick Bird 

Thornton W. Burgess 

Marion F. Lansing 

A. Vimar 

George V. Hobart 

Beatrix Potter 

Louise Jamison 

Stack 

Stevenson 

Stevenson 



Isaac Watts D. D. 
Ethel Crowningshield 

Frances T. Olcott 
Dolores Bacon 
Dolores Bacon 

George V. Hobart 

Rudyard Kipling 

Sara E. Wiltse 

Constance DeArcy MacKay 

Thornton W. Burgess 



David Starr Jordan 

Florence Holbrook 

Mary E. Burt 

Lulu M. Chance 



52 



Story Hour 

Pieces for Every Occasion 

Trees Every Child Should Know 

Books of Fairy Tales, Foxes 

The Street of Seven Stars 

The Outlook Fairy Book for Little People 

The Adventures of Mr. Mocker 

Something to Act 



Kate Douglas Wiggin 

Caroline B. LeRow 

Julie E. Rogers 

Frank A. Nankivill 

Mary R. Reinhart 

Laura Winnington 

Thornton W. Burgess 



MISCELLANEOUS 



From Alien to Citizen 

A Far Journey 

Seen and the Unseen 

Training of a Forester 

Pieces for Every Occasion 

Nations of Europe 

Along the Mohawk Trail 

Fighting a Fire 

True Stories about Horses 

Some Old Flemish Towns 

Farm Management 

Last Shot 

Our Domestic Animals 

Poems of American Patriotism 

American Men of Action 

Geronimos Story of His Life 

Christmas Stories in American Literature 

That Farm 

The Pictorial Life of Christ 

With Stevenson in Samoa 

Tales From Ten Poets 

A Guide to Reading 

The Book of Scottish Poetry 

Greek Wonder Tales 



Edward A. Steiner 

Abraham Mitrie Hthbany 

W. Dean Howell 

Gifford Pinchot 

Caroline B. Le Row 

Charles Morris 

P. K. Fitzgerald 

Charles T. Hall 

Lillian Gask 

George W. Edward3 

Fred W. Card 

Frederick Palmer 

Katherine P. Wormely 

Brinder Matthews 

Burton E Stevenson 

S. M. Barrett 



Mr. Harrison 
Ira S. Dodd 



Harrison S Morris 

John Macey 

Sir. George Douglas, Bart. 

Lucy M. J. Gannett 



53 



The Family Food 

Europe Revised 

Heart Throbs 

Everybody's Saint Francis 

Louise Chandler Moulton 

Great Cities of Europe 

Early Northampton 

They who Knock at Our Gates 

Longfellow Country 

The Amateur Garden 

A Country Library 

Making a Country Home 

A Cook Book 

Standard Atlas and Pictorial Gazette 

Browning and His Century 

Browning's England 

Browning's Italy 

Library of Home Economics in 12 Volumes 



T. C. O'Donnell 
Irvin S. Scott 

Maurice FT Egan 

Lillian Whiting 

Esther Singleton 

Mary Antin 

Helen A. Clark 

George W. Cable 

B. and E. I. Antrim 

J. P. Mowbrey 

Funk and Wagnall 

Helen A. Clark 

Helen A. Clark 

Helen A. Clark 



Volume I, The House 
Volume II, Household Bacteriology 
Volume III, Household Hygiene 
Volume IV, Chemistry /of the Household 
Volume V, Principles of Cookery 



Isabel Bevier, Ph. M. 

S. Maria Elliot 

S. Maria Elliot 

Margaret E. Dodd, S. B. 

Anna Barrows 



Volume VI, Food and Dietics 

Volume VII, Household Management 

Volume VIII, Personal Hygiene 

Volume IX, Home Care of the Sick 

Volume X, Textiles and Clothing 

Volume XI, Study of Child Life 

Volume XII, Care of Children 

Gardens in Their Season 

The Rat 

The Substitute 

A Guide to Music 

Jeanne D'Arc 

Hungary 



Alice Peloubet Norton, M. A. 

Bertha M. Terrill, A. M, 

Maurice Le Bosquet, S. B. 

Amy Elizabeth Pope 

Kate Heintz Watson 

Marion Foster Washburne 

Alfred C. Cotton, A. M., M. D. 

G. M. A. Hewett 

Walter Clark 

Daniel Gregory Mason 

E. M. Wilmot Buxton 

A. T. DeKoven 



54 

Hungarian Fairy-Book Nandor Pogany 

Training of Wild Animals F. C. Bostoek 

Russian Cousins Mary Hazelton Wade 

Hungarian Cousins Mary Nixon Ronlet 

Thanksgiving Robert H. Schauffler 

Seven Great Statesmen Andrew D. White 
American Seen Through the Spectacles of a Foreign Diplomat 

What Men Live By Richard C. Cabot, M. D. 

Magazines and Periodicals in the Library since March 191A 

The Century 

Scribners 

St. Nicholas 

Popular Mechanics 

The Harpers 

The Survey 

The Youths Companion 

Other Magazines and Periodicals to be added to the Library 

after March 1st 1915. 

The Country Life in America 

The Craftsman 

Farest and Stream 

The Outing Magazine 

American Boy 

Garden Magazine 

John Martin's Magazine 

National Geographic Magazine 

THOMAS A. NOLAN, Term Expires 1915, 

MRS. MARGARET A. MULLANY, Term Expires 1916, 

IRVING A. FLINT, Term Expires 1917, 

Trustees. 



Town Clerk's Report 



The vital statistics for the town of Hatfield for the 
year 1914 are as follows: 

BIRTHS BY MONTHS 





No. 


Males 


Females 


January, 


10 


7 


3 


February, 


6 


2 


4 


March, 


10 


5 


5 


April, 


6 


2 


4 


May, 


9 


8 . 


1 


June, 


8 


3 


5 


July, 


7 


2 


5 


August, 


10 


7 


3 


September* 


7 


3 


4 


October, 


8 


2 


6 


November, 


7 


6 


1 


December, 


5 


2 


3 



93 



49 



44 



55 



56 
BIRTHPLACE OF PARENTS 





Father 


Motl 


Born in United States, 


18 


20 


Poland 


68 


65 


Ireland, 





1 


Hungary, 


7 


7 



93 93 

BIRTHS FOE THE FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


64 


79 


69 


74 


81 



MARRIAGES BY MONTHS 

No. 

January, 7 

February, 7 

March, 

April, 2 

May, 3 

June, 3 

July, 1 

August, 2 

September, 2 

October, 4 

November, 2 

December, 

33 



57 

First marriage of both parties, 31. 

Second marriage of groom, first of bride, 2. 

The oldest and youngest grooms were 44 and 20% 
years of age, respectively. 

The oldest and youngest brides were 34 and 
17 11-12 years of age, respectively. 

BIRTHPLACE OF PERSONS MARRIED 



Born in United States, 


Groom. 
12 


Bride. 
13 


Poland, 


19 


18 


Germany, 
Ireland, 


2 



1 
1 



33 



33 



MARRIAGES FOR FIVE PREVIOUS YEARS 



January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May, 

June, 

July, 

August, 



L909 


1910 1911 


1912 




1913 




33 


26 22 


32 




26 






DEATHS BY MONTHS 








No. 


Males. Females 




3 




1 




2 


y, 


3 









3 




2 




1 




1 




2 




2 









2 









2 




4 




3 




1 




1 




1 









2 









2 



58 



September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 



Under 1 year of age, 
Between 1 and 5 years, 
Between 10 and 20 years, 
Between 20 and 30 years, 
Between 30 and 40 years, 
Between 40 and 50 years, 
Between 50 and 60 years, 
Between 60 and 70 years, 
Between 70 and 80 years, 
Between 80 and 90 years, 
Between 90 and 100 years, 



1 





1 


3 


1 


2 


4 


3 


1 


1 


1 





28 


13 


15 


No. 


Males. 


Females 


7 


4 


3 











2 


1 


1 


2 





2 


1 


1 





2 


2 





2 


1 


1 


4 


1 


3 


3 


1 


2 


4 


2 


2 


1 





1 



28 13 15 



Age of oldest person deceased (female) 90 years, 
2 days. 

CAUSES OF DEATH 

Classified according to the nomenclature adopted 
by the State Board of Eegistration. 

Constitutional Diseases 

Senility, 1 

Gastro-Enteritis, 1 

Locomotor Ataxia, 1 



59 



Rheumatism, 


1 


Atrophy, 


2 


Arteria-Sclerosis, 


1 


Endocarditis, 


2 


Pulmonary Tuberculosis, 3 


Local Diseases 


Bronchitis, 


1 


Acute Indigestion, 


1 


Cancer 


1 


Pneumonia, 


3 


Heart Disease, 


3 


Fatty Heart, 


1 


Chronic Nephritis, 


4 


Violent Deaths. 


Drowned, 


1 


Fracture of Skull, 


1 


NAMES OF PERSONS DECEASED 


Michael P. Kiley, 


John Toizko, 


Gendry Zagrodncek, 


John P. Chandler, 


Augusta Shattuck, 


Esther A. Cleveland, 


John Winters, 


Michael J. Sullivan, 


Ethel Sadowski, 


Lekida Wojtkelewicz, 


Richard McGrath, 


Johanna Dwyer, 


Mary Raboin, 


Margaret M. Batzold, 


Bridget Ryan, 


John Botreski, 


Luman S. Crafts, 


Cornelia A. Billings, 


James Porter, 


Frank W. Prince, 


Louise B. Kiley, 


Alexandra Debrowska, 



60 

Johanna Saffer, Emeline P. Jones, 

James Mullins, Frank Marslauka, 

Louise M. Dickinson, Henry Karpenskic. 

DOG LICENSES 

The number of dogs licensed during the year end- 
ing Nov. 30, 1914, with the receipts and settlements of 
the account with the County Treasurer, is as follows : 
64 male dogs at $2 each, $128.00 

5 female dogs at $5 each, 25.00 



$153.00 
Less fees, 69 dogs at 20 cents each, 13.80 



Paid County Treasurer, $139.20 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Town Clerk. 



Assessor's Report 



Value of assessed personal estate, $ 470,805 
Value of assessed real estate, 1,521,072 



Total value of assessed estate, 






$1,991,877.00 


Value of assessed buildings, 
Value of assessed land, 




$809,829 
711,243 








$1,521,072.00 


Number of polls assessed, 

Residents assessed on property, 
Non-residents assessed on property. 
For poll tax only, 
Rate of tax per $1,000, 




651 

405 

80 

369 

$18.90 


Number of horses assessed. 
Cows, 

Neat Cattle, 
Swine, 
Fowls 

Dwelling houses, 
Acres of land, 








495 

256 

28 

11 

196 

379 

9,258 



61 



62 

State Tax, $3,750.75 

County Tax, 2,881.38 

Town Tax, 31,640.50 

Overlayings, 675.84 



$38,948.47 

Estimated Bank and Corporation Tax, 1,100.00 

Excise Tax, 772.39 

Omitted Assessments, 210.60 

Value of property exempt from taxation under 
Chapter 490, Acts of 1909. 
Literary institutions, 76,138 

Church property, 31,650 



$107,788.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

EDSON W. STRONG, 
P. W. MULLINS, 
L. H. KINGSLEY, 

Assessors of Hatfield. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



-OF THE- 



School Committee 



AND 



Superintendent of Schools 



-OF THE- 



Town of Hatfield 



•FOR THE- 



Year Ending December 31, 1914 



School Organization 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Arthur R. Breor, Chairman, Term expires 1916 

John F. O'Dea, Secretary, Term expires 1917 

Thaddeus Graves, Term expires 1915 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Clinton J. Richards, 

22 Prospect Avenue, Northampton 

Telephone 858-W 

SCHOOL PHYSICIANS 

A. J. Bonneville, M. D., (Center and North Hatfield 
schools. ) 

C. A. Byrne, M. D., (Hill, Bradstreet and West Hat- 
field.) 

TRUANT OFFICER 
S. W. Kingsley. 

SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Spring Term begins March 29, 1915, ends June 4, 1915. 
Fall Term begins Sept. 6, 1915, ends Dec. 17, 1915. 
Winter Term begins Jan. 3, 1916, ends March 17, 1916. 
Spring Term begins March 27, 1916, ends June 2, 1916. 

65 



Report of School Committee 



The committee organized for the present year with 
A. R. Breor, chairman, and John F. O'Dea, secretary. 
The time for their regular meeting was fixed for the 
first Thursday of each month. 

The joint committee of Bernardston, Hatfield and 
Hadley met in April and re-elected Clinton J. Richards 

as superintendent of schools at a salary of $1800. 

During the year we inspected all buildings and 
made whatever repairs seemed necessary. All floors 
have been oiled and the West Hatfield building was 
given a much needed coat of paint. New desks are 
needed at West Hatfield and will be installed as soon 
as the committee see their way clear to do so. 

At the beginning of this school year, we were very 
much handicapped for room, as the new school building 
was not then completed. It was necessary to hold half 
day sessions at the Hill and Center schools for all first 
and second grade children. 

At the opening of the winter term we find our 
schools in the new building, and now with our capable 
staff of teachers and ample room and equipment, we 
expect results that will be worthy of commendation. 

66 



67 

Now that we have our building ready for use, an- 
other problem confronts us. This is the proper grading 
and arrangement of the school grounds and walks. At 
present the children have no suitable place to play as 
the grounds were left in such condition after the con- 
struction of the building that there has been mud every- 
where, making it a difficult task to keep the building 
clean. iThis work should be provided for in the spring 
as soon as the ground is in shape to be worked. 

The school rules and regulations have been re- 
cently revised with some special rules for the new 
building. We believe that they are for the best good 
of all concerned, and that they will work out satisfac- 
torily when the pupils become accustomed to them. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

For Fiscal Year Ending Dec. 31, 1914. 

Resources 

Town Appropriation, $9350.00 

Tuition, City of Boston, 13.00 

From State, for superintendent of schools, 500.00 

School tickets sold, 76.50 

Books and supplies sold. 3.50 

Vietrola concert, 27.25 



Total resources, $9970.25 



68 




Expenditures 




Salaries : 




Teachers, 


$4500.20 


School committee, 


60.00 


Superintendent of schools, 


561.18 


Supervisors, 


231.00 


Janitors, 


632.10 




$5984.48 


Books and supplies, 


938.38 


Fuel, 


944.57 


Repairs, 


633.61 


Transportation, 


130.00 


Miscellaneous, 


148.82 


Furniture for new building, 


1190.39 



Total expenditures, $9970.25 

ARTHUR R. BREOR, 

Chairman. 



Superintendent's Report 



Owing to the change in the town's fiscal year and 
the consequent change in the date for the annual town 
meeting, this report is supposed to cover a little more 
than the period of ten months closing with the year 

1914. The next report should cover the calendar year 

1915. During the past year all the schools have made 
steady progress, high standards of discipline and in- 
struction have been maintained and the attendance 
and interest of pupils have been generally satisfactory 
so far as the limited accommodations have permitted. 

THE NEW BUILDING 

The erection and opening of the new building at 
Hatfield Center marks the most important epoch in 
the school history of the town. In it will be gathered 
nearly two-thirds of the pupils of the town under most 
healthful and inspiring surroundings, if the present 
plans for grading and arranging the grounds are car- 
ried out. The most approved requirements regarding 
light, heat and ventilation are fully met, the furniture 
is of the best, the sanitary arrangements are com- 
plete, and the playgrounds, when finished, will be 

69 



70 

ample. The public may fairly expect the best service 
both of those who care for the building and of those 
who teach or direct the work of the children. 

A town's intelligence and public spirit is shown 
in nothing more clearly than in the way it provides for 
the education of its children. Hatfield is very fortu- 
nate in having for a building committee men who have 
conceived and carried into execution plans for a 
building which so fitly expresses in its form and pur- 
pose the best ideals of the town. No one who has not 
been in close touch with the work being done can 
realize the amount of time and effort which the mem- 
bers of the committee have devoted to this undertaking. 

The organization of this new consolidated school 
— for such it is — presents new problems as well as 
larger opportunities; and we are fortunate in having 
secured a principal of rare ability and experience, and 
teachers who will work with her loyally and effectively. 
Where, so large a number of pupils are gathered, cer- 
tain rules and restrictions are required, but only such 
regulations will be made as are necessary to protect 
the building from injury, promote efficiency, and 
guard the comfort and safety of the children. 

COURSE OP STUDY 

To make a course of study that is neither too 
rigidly prescriptive nor too general in its scope, is no 
easy task. It cannot be worked out off-hand at an 
office desk, but can only be evolved out of the study 
and experience of those in direct contact with pupils. 



71 

A committee of superintendents and teachers ap- 
pointed by the State Board are preparing outlines to 
be used in the public schools of the state. It is expected 
that they will be ready for use at the opening of the 
next school year. For this reason no attempt will be 
made, as suggested last year, to revise the present 
course of study. 

I wish to refer again to the value of having work 
in practical arts in some form offered in all our schools. 
Several of our teachers are carrying on very creditably 
some form of handwork. Many of the best schools in 
other towns and cities are introducing such- work and 
find that it adds to rather than takes from the value 
of the regular school subjects. With a comparatively 
inexpensive equipment valuable lessons in elementary 
domestic science and manual training could be given 
to the older pupils. 

In our neighboring town of Hadley a large major- 
ity of the boys and girls had home gardens during 
the past season under the direction of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural college and the agricultural instruct- 
or of Hopkins academy. The town has just been award- 
ed a State sweepstakes cup by the Massachusetts Board 
of Agriculture for the best garden work done by school 
boys and girls. It is noticeable that a pupil's garden 
work tends to increase his interest in his school. In 
fact, some of the older pupils have been held in school 
through their interest first aroused by garden or field 
work. 



72 
TEXT BOOKS 

The schools were probably never before so well 
supplied with modern textbooks in good condition. 
The greater part of the old, soiled, and badly worn 
books have been replaced by new ones at special ex- 
change rates. The Aldine Readers, the new Frye Geo- 
graphies, and the Southworth-Stone Arithmetics con- 
tinue as basal texts. The Howe Readers are replacing 
the Cyr and Hawthorne for supplementary use, and 
the McLaughlin and Van Tyne History has been intro- 
duced in place of the Montgomery. The introduction 
of the Hutchinson Physiologies will be completed dur- 
ing the year. A new two-book series of lessons in Eng- 
lish has been adopted. It has already been in use in 
several nearby towns and has proved very satisfactory. 

It is hoped that before very long each school in 
town may be provided with a good globe and suitable 
wall maps. They are almost indispensable for a satis- 
factory teaching of geography and history, and can be 
constantly used in connection with general reading and 
studies of current events. 

Attention is called to the section in the rules and 
regulations which provides that so far as possible 
there shall be no interchange of books and busy wor& 
materials among pupils. This will tend to increase 
the child's sense of responsibility for his books and 
help to avoid the contagion sometimes conveyed by 
school books and materials. 



73 
EVENING SCHOOL 

Towns which issue at least twenty working cer- 
tificates to illiterates are now required by law to main- 
tain an evening school for a portion of the school year. 
In accordance with this law an evening school is to be 
conducted in the School Street building for two or 
three evenings a week commencing Jan. 26. Many 
of those who will attend are to be permanent residents 
of Hatfield, and will form an important part of the 
town's life and activities. It would seem to be a broad 
and generous policy, in keeping with the best traditions 
of the town, to afford them the opportunity to acquire 
at least the rudiments of an English education. 

MUSIC, DRAWING AND PENMANSHIP 

Miss Boyle has continued to direct the work in 
music to the satisfaction of all concerned. Her report 
will be found on another page. 

Commencing with the fall term, Miss Asenath 
Landers was secured as supervisor of drawing, and 
Miss Anna L. Kilmurry as supervisor of penmanship. 
Miss Landers also supervises in Deerfield and North- 
field, and Miss Kilmurry in Easthampton and Am- 
herst. Both appear to be doing excellent work and we 
hope to be able to retain their services for the coming 
year. 

CONCLUSION 

In looking back over the work of the last three 
years we feel that some substantial progress has been 
made. There has been a steady increase in the num- 



74 

ber of pupils and teachers and a corresponding demand 
for more and better buildings and equipment. Nothing 
revolutionary or sensational has been attempted, for 
it is realized that all growth, if it is to be healthful 
and enduring, should not be forced beyond what is 
normal. 

Progress is everywhere. In art, science, commerce 
and industrial life new ideas and methods are being 
adopted. Our schools should not be an exception to 
the rule. Practices and conditions that were satisfac- 
tory years ago would not be tolerated today. With this 
demand for higher efficiency comes also increased ex- 
pense, whenever an attempt is made to meet this de- 
mand. 

In all our plans for improved school conditions 
the good of the children is the real objective point. 
The child of today will be the man or woman of tomor- 
row, and the future welfare of our town depends large- 
ly on the degree of intelligence, practical ability and 
character that our children are acquiring. We believe 
that our citizens are willing to meet the responsibility 
of giving to the children of Hatfield an opportunity to 
develop in our schools those qualities that make for 
efficiency and good citizenship. 

CLINTON J. EICHARDS. 



Report of Principal of Center School 



I hereby submit the following report as principal 
of Center school of Hatfield. 

The first term was spent in Smith Academy where 
it was necessary for three teachers to occupy one 
room. Under such conditions satisfactory work was 
difficult, altho after the first few weeks we were able 
to adjust ourselves. 

*s The winter term opened in the new building with 
an attendance of two hundred twenty-seven pupils. 
This necessitates a more rigid form of discipline. In 
looking over the rules and regulations in a former town 
report I find that few if any changes have been made, 
but more attention has been given to enforcing those 
[already made, as is necessary in a large building. 

In order to secure the desired results parents must 
co-operate with teachers, and I will be pleased to meet 
parents at any time to discuss any misunderstanding 01 
dissatisfaction that may arise. 

MARY L. ALLAIEE. 



Report of Supervisor of Music 



The work in music in the schools during the past 
year has been carried on as formerly; musical theory. 
sight singing, individual work, and chorus singing. 

Our aim is to make the music period one of plea- 
sure as well as educational value. But how can this be 
accomplished if the child does not understand what 
he is doing? In order that he may, the fundamentals 
of music must be taught step by step. 

When the child first enters school he is taught by 
note, simple little songs which appeal to the little 
people. Great care must be exercised in choosing 
good material. These songs are gradually increased in 
difficulty according to grade and understanding. With 
this song drill, theory must be presented in an inter- 
esting manner. Theory is taught under two headings 
— Time and Tune. 

Individual work and sight singing trains the child 
to think and act independently, and in this way he 
gains confidence in himself which is an aid not only in 
music but in other things which may be required of 
him. 

76 



77 

We may justly say that progress has been made 
along these lines and that our children are able to give 
an intelligent interpretation, with good tone quality, of 
any song within their grade, This work has been ac- 
complished with the co-operation of the school officials 
in furnishing necessary material, and with the faithful 
ness and persevereance of the grade teachers. 

A victrola has been placed in the Center building 
which will enable the children to hear and recognize 
the best in music. 

MAUDE E. BOYLE. 



Report of Medical Inspectors 



When medical inspection was adopted in Hatfield, 
we were in the midst of a severe epidemic of scarlet 
fever; this was followed in the succeeding year by an- 
other less severe; since which we have had occasional 
cases, but no epidemic. 

At first the children were antagonistic, the younger 
ones being afraid of inspection; many were subnormal 
in physical condition. 

We have seen this change to a welcome of inspec- 
tion, and a cooperation in the suggestions we have been 
able to make. 

At no time has the general health of the pupils 
been better than during the last year, although spas- 
adic cases of scarlet fever and diphtheria have been 
present in town, and nothwithstanding the number of 
children attending school has increased very rapidly 
in the last few years. 

We have been particularly fortunate in the co- 
operation of the townspeople; the sanitary conditions 
of the vairous schools have all been improved from 
time to time, till all are satisfactory. 

Little need be said of our new school house as it 
represents all that is best in modern school sanitation. 

CHAS. A. BYRNE. 
A. J. BONNEVILLE. 



79 



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Hatfield School 
Roles and Regulations 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

2. The Superintendent of schools shall have th:> 
care and supervision of schools under the direction 
and control of the School Committee, and shall be 
their executive officer. 

2. He shall visit the schools as often as his other 
duties will permit to obtain a personal knowledge of 
their condition and to assist the teachers in the per- 
formance of their duties. 

3. He shall have a voice in the councils of the 
Committee, nominate teachers, recommed textbooks 
and have charge of the administration of the course of 
study, and of the grading, classification, and promo- 
tion of pupils. 

4. He shall acquaint himself with whatever con- 
cerns t]\e interest and progress of popular education 
and may call meetings of the teachers for the purpose 
of advising in regard to the best methods of instruction 
discipline, and school management. 

80 



81 

5. He shall inspect the school premises, textbooks, 
and apparatus and report to the Committee any de- 
ficiency or condition unfavorable to the health or pro- 
gress of pupils, with suggestions for correction or im- 
provement. 

6. He shall assist the School Committee in keeping 
their records and accounts, and in making such reports 
as are required by law. 

PRINCIPALS 

1. In every school building containing two or 
more schools one teacher shall be appointed as Princi- 
pal. 

2. Principals shall have general charge of the 
schoolbuildings, grounds and appurtenances of their 
respective schools. They shall have access to all parts 
of the school premises and inspect them at regular in- 
tervals of not more than one week, and shall give such 
assistance or directions as may be found necessary in 
the different rooms. 

3. They shall make rules, subject to the approval 
of the Committee, for the care and control of pupils in 
and around the school buildings and grounds, and may 
assign teachers and janitors to any special duties in 
and about the school premises. They shall especially 
provide for the control and supervision of pupils dur- 
ing the recess periods and noon intermission, both with- 
in the buildings and on the school grounds. 

4. They shall have charge of all books and sup- 
plies for their buildings, distribute them to the dif 



82 

ferent rooms, and cause a careful record of the same 
to be made. 

5. Disorderly or refractory pupils may be sent for 
correction to the Principal, who alone shall have the 
right of suspension. 

6. Any principal who may find it necessary to 
suspend a pupil, must immediately notify the parents, 
and the School Committee, or Superintendent, giving 
the offense and the conditions imposed. Any case of 
truancy should be immediately reported to a Truant 
Officer and the Superintendent. 

TEACHERS 

1. Teachers shall be in their respective rooms at 
least fifteen minutes before the opening of the forenoon 
and afternoon sessions, or earlier when necessary. Any 
failure to arrive at the time required shall be tardiness 
and shall be so reported to the Principal and by her 
to the Superintendent. 

2. They are to assist in the order of the halls and 
lines and shall respond quickly to the signal bells. 
There shall be no unnecessary talking in the halls either 
by teachers or pupils. They are expected to check dis- 
order occurring at any time or place on the school pre- 
mises and correct the misconduct of any pupil, to what- 
ever room he may belong. 

3. In the Center building at least two teachers 
shall be on duty during each noon intermission. They 
shall have constant oversight of the pupils who are al- 
lowed to remain. 



83 

4. They shall prepare three copies of their daily 
schedule; one to be posted on the outside of the class 
room door or on the bulletin board, one to be kept at 
the desk, and the third to be handed to the Superintend- 
ent. After his approval, no material changes shall be 
made without his advice or consent. 

5. They shall require excuses from parents or 
guardians either in person or by written note in all 
cases of absence or tardiness. All excuses should giv?, 
the cause of absence. Unexcused absences should be' 
reported to the Truant Officer and Superintendent and 
be regarded as cases of truancy. 

6. There shall be kept at each teacher's desk, 
readily accessible for the inspection of school officials : 
the school register, program, seating plan, plan book 
and record of work, record of books and supplies, re- 
cord of pupils' standing together with some of their 
more recent written work. 

7. The Superintendent may grant to each teacher 
one day in each fall and winter terms to visit other pub 
lie schools, and may designate the schools to be visited. 
Teachers who avail themselves of this permission shall 
make a written report to the Superintendent within 
one month of such visit, as to the schools visited and 
exercises observed with remarks and criticisms thereon. 
They are also allowed two days to attend state or 
county teachers' institutes or conventions. 

8. Whenever any teacher is temporarily absent 
from school, it shall be her duty to report at once to 
the Committee or Superintendent, but in no case shall 



84 

she furnish a substitute without the consent of the 
School Officials. 

9. Teachers shall observe carefully the ventilation, 
heat, and light of their rooms and endeavor to keep 
,the temperature at about 68 degrees Farenheit. They 
may appoint pupils to keep a record of the thermometer 
on blanks provided for that purpose, but pupils should 
not be allowed to adjust the window shades or regulate 
the heat. 

10. Teachers should insist on care and economy in 
the use of books and supplies. As far as practicable 
the interchange of books, pencils, and seat work mate- 
rial shall be avoided. Each pupil should be allowed 
to keep the same book that is first assigned him in any 
subject until he is ready for another or more advanc- 
ed book. It should be marked plainly with his name so 
that it may be easily identified from term to term. 

11. Teachers shall be paid at the end of each four 
week period except at the close of a term when the 
time of payment may be varied. They shall notify the 
Superintendent, before the time of making the pay- 
roll for any period, of any loss of time with the reason 
therefor. 

SUPERVISORS 

1. At the beginning of each school year Supervi- 
sors, acting with the Superintendent of Schools, shall 
prepare a program indicating the time to be given to 
each school, and a general outline of the work to be 
done in each department. 



85 

2. Each teacher shall be notified of the time when 
Supervisors may be expected at her school, and this 
time shall not be changed except for urgent reasons and 
after due notice. 

3. Supervisors shall notify the Superintendent 
any loss of time or failure to meet engagements at the 
schools. 

PUPILS 

1. Pupils shall be considered under the joint juris- 
diction of teachers and parents when on the way to or 
from school. They are not to leave the vicinity of the 
school buildings or grounds without permission of 
teacher or principal. 

2. No pupil shall enter any hall or room other than 
the one where he regularly belongs except by the spe- 
cial permission of his teacher. They shall not assemble 
about the school buildings at any unreasonable time 
before the opening of school. After dismissal they shall 
go at once to their homes unless they remain by consent 
of teachers. The Principal may make any special rules 
necessary to carry the provisions of this section in 
effect, subject to the approval of the Superintendent. 

3. No pupil under the age of five years shall be ad- 
mitted to school, and no pupil under the age of seven 
years shall be admitted by teachers to the first grade, 
after October 1st in any year, unless he is qualified to 
enter the classes already formed. But the Superintend- 
ent of Schools may admit such a pupil, when, after 
investigation, he finds that the conditions seem to 
justify such action. 



86 

4. At the Center, pupils are not to be admitted 
into tjie new building until fifteen minutes before each 
session, except by special permission, or when neces- 
sary in cold or stormy weather. On entering they shall 
pass to their rooms without unnecessary delay and not 
leave without permission. They shall pass quietly 
through the halls and stairways at all times. 

GENERAL DUTIES OF JANITORS 

1. Janitors shall have the immediate care of school 
grounds, fences, apparatus, etc., and shall act under the 
direction of their respective Principals, who shall see 
that their duties are properly performed. 

2. They shall keep the buildings clean and com- 
fortable, care for walks and steps in winter, make ne- 
cessary minor repairs and report promptly to the Prin- 
cipal any injury or defacing of the school property. 

3. They shall maintain as far as possible an even 
temperature of 68 degrees Farenheit during the day. 

JANITOR OP NEW BUILDING 

1. He shall have special charge, under direction of 
the Principal, of the entire school premises. He shall 
make any minor repairs needed, report the need of 
more important repairs to the Principal and Com- 
mittee, and have the general supervision of all repairs 
and improvements to the building or grounds when- 
ever made. 

2. He should visit all rooms at least once during 
each session to observe the temperature. 



87 

3. He shall wind and regulate clocks; and display 
the school flag as required by law. 

4. As far as possible he should keep walks and 
steps clear of ice and snow, sanding the same when 
necessary. In summer, lawns are to be kept smooth and 
neat by mowing and trimming as needed. 

5. He shall keep the building clean and orderly, 
sweeping halls and stairways daily if needed, and 
floors of classrooms thoroughly twice each week, or 
oftener as required. After sweeping floors, dust should 
be removed from all furniture with a dustless duster. 
At week ends he should clean out chalk trays and re- 
move the blackboard erasers to be cleaned. Black- 
boards should be washed at least once in two weeks, 
and waste baskets should be emptied when necessary 
and returned to the rooms from which they were tak- 
en. Toilets and lavatories are to be kept clean and free 
from odor by flushing, cleaning, and the use of suitable 
disinfectants and deodorizers. 

6. He shall assist the principal and teachers in 
every way possible to secure and maintain good order 
in and about the building, especially before the morn- 
ing session and during the recesses and noon intermis- 
sion. He shall have special oversight of the boys' toi- 
let room during the recess periods and shall prevent 
any improper conduct or abuse of privileges. 

7. He shall have charge of the cleaning of the 
building during vacations and also have the special 
oversight and control of the school grounds at all 
times throughout the year. 



88 
GENERAL 

1. The hours for the school sessions of the gram- 
mar grades shall he from 9.00 A. M. to 12.00 M., and 
from 1.15 to 3.30 P .M. The sessions of the primary 
grades shall he determined hy the School Officials in 
accordance with the needs and conditions of each 
school. 

A recess of not more than fifteen minutes shall be 
allowed in each half-day session. 

2. No circulars or advertisements shall be distri- 
buted in the school nor shall any collection or subscrip- 
tion be taken without the consent of the Superintend- 
ent. 

3. The use of tobacco in any form is strictly for- 
bidden in or about the school buildings. 

Approved by the School Committee of Hatfield Jan. 
1, 1915. 



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